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Full text of "Splinters"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries 



http://archive.org/details/splinters7577roge 



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Spring Number 

Nineteen Hundred and Sixty-seven 




ters 



Editor-in-Chief 
Prudence Allen 

Literary Board 



Martha Chigas 
Catherine Cowles 
Lydia Deshler 



Martha Baker 
Marian Crocker 



Deborah Gale 
Janet Kendall 
Sherill Wickwire 



Martha Fisher 

Beth Bullock 
Donna Corroon 
Deborah Gale 
Isabel Kinney 
Jodi Landwehr 
Jan Laundon 

Faculty Literary Advisor 
Mrs. Banks S. Worsham 



Business Board 
Manager— Challis Walker 

Amy Whitehead 

Art and thotography 
Editor— Gayle DeBell 

Art Contributors 



Sandra Hall 
Sandra Shipton 



Lynda Pryor 

Laura Lockwood 
Leslie Maggy 
Alida McIlvain 
Lisa Strasburg 
Kathleen Sullivan 
Sherill Wickwire 

Eaculty Art Advisor 
Mrs. John Perloff 



f ^%£ 




Vol. 75 



Literary, 1967 



No. 1 



Editorial 



When Americans converse, we usually stand at a regulated distance from 
each other. Without any trouble, we speakers can extend our arms so that the index 
fingers will neatly fit into the listeners' ears. In conversation, we maintain the 
proper arm's distance to talk at one another. Symbolically, American conversation is 
merely a physical extension of our thoughts that we poke into any conveniently 
distanced ears, which ironically cannot hear, for they are well-plugged. It seems, 
then, that we can hear only ourselves while we talk at everyone else. 

The intimate French conversations greatly contrast with the typical exchange 
system that we have adopted. Instead of isolating the interest of a few with our 
news, we manage to arrange a vast number of people in perfect spacial relationship; 
then, we poke our ideas and convictions into their deafened ears. Our image of the 
popular party-person is the artful conversationalist who simply resembles a bicycle 
wheel that rotates his body about a group and consecutively extends his arms as 
spokes into the perfectly orientated ears. Or, taking another commonplace example, 
we walk toward each other on a street; we halt when our fingers can tightly plug 
ears; we poke hello, thank you, and how are you; then we walk on wondering who 
it was we greeted. We talk on and on with outstretched fingers, and for all our 
talk, we hear only ourselves. 

Italians do not poke and plug; thev talk with their hands so people of all 
sizes can hear, question, answer, and then understand. We, on the other hand, try 
to poke someone who is just half our size. With the advantage of a longer arm we 
can stuff all that we want without fear of encountering a question. Shorter arms 
cannot poke back. If an unconventional attempt to speak is made, we simply remind 
our listener that we must never shout at people out of ear-poking distance. We can 
turn from our small victim and let him pick from his ears the message; he, in turn, 
can poke words of love, freedom, justice, and Freud into some still smaller plugged 
ears. This poking-plugging tradition is so much a part of our conversational habits 
that it is instinctive for a small babe to fondle stuffed animals by poking deaf ears. 

Americans could move a considerable step back or a friendly step closer to 
talk at the targets of our conversation. We could put down the coffee cups and 
cigarette butts. We could unplug our victims' ears and set free our hands. And 
with close attention to international conversing habits we might leam the meaning 
of our talking; unplugged people will hear and will react. We might learn the truth 
of our meaning; unplugged people will question and will teach. We might even 
learn the art of talking to, not at, our fellow ears. 



Prudence Allen '67 



Viet-Commercial 

There is fear, perhaps distaste, in your heart. You have a desire to be some- 
where else catching the sun's rays in your mouth, as you run until you drop from 
exhaustion. 

You visualize the large, brown eyes of Vietnamese children, looking for night 
and day upon your face, as thev hide in the shadows. You are the protector of the 
buildings that house them and the dispenser of warmth and security. It makes a man 
out of you when you have no desire to be a man and play father. 

Your eye must be capable of distinction between purity and filth and your 
mind prepared to absorb lead and reward. 

You must feel a sense of accomplishment whether you clothe a naked child 
or repair a weapon to be used later to kill your enemy. 

Smile as though you were warm inside even if you bitterly oppose your 
superior. Don't let your face be hardened into a frown from which the mass observes 
your dejection. 

You are a minute part of the mass (a regiment of people) made poor through 
expulsion of morals, faith and love. 

Be realistic in conception of war. Have no fantasy of victory or disillusion- 
ment in defeat. 

You know what you are seeking and possibly you are being sent to find it, 
although your vision is obscured by the density of the jungle and your desire is 
dampened as you trudge through marsh to avoid the undergrowth. 

You are a pillar to remain standing until war takes the "ouch" out of the 
Curad band-aid covering the hole in your chest, through which your enemy gazes 
into the future. 

Sheri Wickwire '67 





Leaf Colors 

Mahogany, maize 

And bittersweet, 

Leaves are falling at my feet. 

Rust, gold, scarlet 

And red, 

Drifting from above my head. 





Victoria Harp '69 



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Anticipating Orange 

Now the ugly snow is once again slushing under and around my feet. I feel 
that my long wait will never terminate; these harsh days of sorrow will never cease. 
I wonder— When will better days rescue me? 

When the snow turns dirty and undesirable, I know that spring will soon 
come marching forward, waving her hands over all the front yards, and suddenly 
the snow will dribble away into the sewers. Once again I will have my bare streets 
and will feel my frayed wits slowly draw closer together with anticipation. 

Then summer will abruptly bounce in but soon sail away with the same old 
clouds in a gust of cold wind. I' will feel my anxious spirits climb out of the dark 
cave where they were hiding. Because, alas, fall will be here! Yes, after all those long 
days of anxiety, hope, and anguish, I will feel, in a sense, relieved that it is autumn. 
For that is the time that I (with my dear friend and companion, Charlie Brown) 
will be able to meet once more with our savior, The Great Pumpkin. 

Janet Kendall '67 




The Party 

Thousands of crushed cigarettes 

left the room with a musty, 

suffocating smell. White clouds 

lingered in each corner, hovering over 

the ratty chair and sofa, so as 

almost to hide their ugly appearance. 

Glasses lay on their sides with their drippings 

staining the wine-colored 

rug. In the far room, the same 

record wore on. Only few were left 

now; perhaps they would leave soon. 

Their voices carried them further 

off until the only sound was that 

of the record, and I stood alone. 

I crossed the room and into the 
bedroom. Mv hand snatched at the 
needle, scraping the record. On 
each side of me were the signs of the 
party. I didn't like it, 
for it seemed to me that something 
wrong had been done. Everyone had 
done it together and yet alone. 
They each had laughed and talked and it had 
seemed good at the time. But now 
they would all go their own ways back 
home, and in their swirling, aching 
heads, they would begin to realize how they 
had tricked themselves. They 
had covered reality with a musty suffocating smell. 

Each sip— they knew— drained 
a little more of the brain . . . 

The brain which the entire body 
revolves around. Yet they all tried 
to destroy it— and themselves. 

Quickly, I picked up each bottle 
and glass . . . threw them into a 
carton and left them outside my 
door. 

I crawled into bed and switched 
the light off. I attempted sleep, but 
the musty clouds engulfed my head. 



Debbie Gale '67 




T>°^ 



a\e 




At Midnight 

A death-like calm begirded the town. The vast dark sky sent a faint wisp of 
air to rusde the few remaining dead leaves an the stalwart trees. Like stark steely 
pins spiraling up to pierce the darkness, the trees formed a regimental line guarding 
the broken, cracked pavement of the narrow roadway. Behind them the shadowy 
buildings loomed in repose like tombs marking an ancient burial ground. The town 
was a timeless area with no past or future. It was a space that seemed destined to 
stay hushed and immobile. 

Beth Bullock '68 



Undertow 

Grey clam shells on pearl wheels 

passing through fathoms of 

veiled hate and scorn 

crawling in the muck and mire 

of indecency and degradation. 
Infinity will engulf the 
dead wood and relics 

tossed into its insatiable claws. 
Only the non-parasites will be 
untouched by the grasping 
tides of Hell. 



Martha Chigas '67 




The Storm 

The sky was an ever-changing pattern over the rolling sea. The directionless 
wind began to blow. The storm mounted. 

Dark and foreboding floated the endless skies; emerald green, the angry sea. 
White froth upon Neptune's vast acres tossed and turned. The sable night in 
Olympian luster grew as a ritual for Zeus and Thor, who came rushing with blind- 
ing flash and deafening crash. 

The boat's straining hull bent itself against the fury of destruction, as walled 
mountains of fluid hell paused as if in thought and then rushed downward in a 
never-ending flood. Swallowed within the monstrous grasp, the boat breathed its last. 



Lee McKallagat '68 



Ode to a Draft Card Burner 

black soot on brick walls 

fingertips of a little boy 

void of pretense 

running in the sun along cobbled streets 

ashes 

yellow 

fingertips of youth along a rail fence 

and the spikes won't pierce leather boots 

and a green dot is followed in search of winter wheat 

and disfiguration is horizontal. 

and he is not crowded by harsh noise 

and silenced bv distaste 

and a hair crosses over his eye 

and another flows under his collar. 

and his shirt is removed and hidden under a black towel 

and he wipes his face with neutrality 

and his hair splits the black with color 

blond purity 

grapes dropped from basement windows 

and dried in the sun 

diluted with rain water 

drained of impurities through mesh screen 

wine 

quench the dirt floor 

and quench his tongue, removing ill word 

and unsanitary mud caked on boots. 

quench the particles of his conscientious objections 

safely in glass canisters. 

and war bumps his bottle 

possibly cracks it under red umbrellas— 

and the wind whispers his name through plaid trees 
squinting in perspective 

pouring emotion through spokes of the umbrella 
raised to shelter a red ant. 



Sheri Wickwire '67 





Little Blue Riding Hood 

Once upon a time, there lived a fair young girl named Blue. She lived in a 
city apartment with her auntie. 

One day, Blue's auntie suggested that Blue ought to take her grandmother 
a copy of the latest TV Guide. Blue agreed. On with her blue cape and off she went. 
She hopped the nearest subway and, after three stops, she got off and marched up 
the street to Gran's apartment. Strangely enough, outside the building was a motor 
scooter. This seemed very odd to Blue, since Gran lived in the city housing project 
for the elderly, but she thought that someone must have parked it in the wrong 
space. Perhaps it belonged to a customer of the coffee house next door. 

She skipped up the steps to Gran's place and sounded the buzzer. As usual, 
the little peekhole opened and a brown eye appeared. Blue was suspicious of nothing 
(Gran had brown eyes). The door slowly opened and there stood Wolf. She was 
surprised. Then Wolf made his first move. 

He said, "How's about a date tonight, Blue Baby?" 

Her reply, "Fine with me." 

That evening, after Blue had returned from her frightening experience at 
Gran's, she heard a roaring sound outside her apartment. She looked out the window 
and there was Wolf on his Honda, all readv to go. He gave a blast on his horn and 
a loud whistle. In a few seconds, Blue was on the back of the bike. Off they went, 
happily ever after, of course. 

Carol Rowley '67 





In the Morning 

In the morning 

Late birds dart through the air 
Landing here and there 
But never for long. 

The wind is sharp and cold 
Whistling through the trees 
Taking all the leaves 
The winter gains its hold. 



Lorrie LaCour '68 



Crystal Child 

On gilded wings of the golden angel 
bear them away to the castle 
A perilous trip up through tangerine sky 
the word of love means die. 

Children's love in crystal eyes 
reflecting a world passing bv 
Light and laughing minds in autumn play 
never suspecting their cold day. 

Gaze through a convex watch crystal 
translucent water colors infiltrate a portrayal 
of one hundred small bodies huddled in dismay 
imbibing a final display, 
cascading iridescence, warmth and love. 



Then dusk with red afterglow 

silent sea wind begins to blow 

Purple cloak suspended high the power divine 

obliterated view and begirded all childkind 

In this state if onlv it not befall 
through blank space the free fall 
of the unloved crystal child. 



Beth Bullock '68 



Hey You ! 

"Hey you, have you ever looked at yourself? 
R-E-A-L-L-Y looked? Kind of brutal aren't vou? 
Quite the independent one! Don't need anybody to 
lean on. Watch it when vou fall. Nobody will clean 
you up. We'll walk all over you!" 



Jodi Landwehr '68 



Sunday's Decline 

Masses descend somewhat happy but pensive. 
Interrogations begin, replies are affirmative. 
The past is recollected, revealed. 
The commotion lulls- 
dejection sets in. 



Sandra Hall '67 



Blue Is 

Blue has no shape or size or odor or sound. 
Blue attaches itself to objects or parts of objects. 
Blue may look different to everyone, but to everyone 
it is cool, and sometimes sad. 

If you paint a room light blue, in the winter 
it will have an uninviting and frigid aspect. It is like 
the inside of an ice cube. 

Blue is the artist's brush on the shadow of a 
man's face. Blue goes with blond hair, and blue is the 
shadows of snow. 

Blue is looking out a window at the moon or 
at twilight with a candle flickering in your room. 
Blue is the sea and water. 

Blue is for boys. Blue is what you feel when 
you've been crying for a long time. Blue is metallic, 
dull. Blue is sweet and innocent. Blue is dark and 
mysterious. Blue is mv favorite color. 



Sue Briggs '67 



El Ploto Supremo 




The open trap door revealed El Baron with 
his custom-made super-destructive, infallible cap 
pistol. El Baron stepped forward into the light 
thus revealing his sturdv masculine features. But 
El Baron's face was distorted with anger. His side- 
kick Chico was reported held captive by an enemy 
agency. The enemy agency wanted the plan of El 
Baron's custom-made, super-destructive, infallible 
cap pistol. The enemy agency's desire did not 
bother El Baron. In his mind, plans were already 
forming by which he could save Chico. After all, 
the good agents always emerge victorious. 

But this time the suspecting El Baron would 
not reach Chico, for the enemy agency had mali- 
cious doings intended for him. 
On the way to the place where he suspected the enemy agency to be located, 
El Baron met with a slight diversion in the shape of a woman. Naturally this woman 
wasn't an everyday tvpe of female; she was an enemy agent named Lolita. Lolita 
wore on her finger the special deliciously indescribable, sleep-perfumed ring. One 
breath of the marvelous vapor and El Baron was in a deep sleep. 

Meanwhile, Chico, without El Baron's aid, was trying to appear as if he were 
desperate to escape. Of course his first efforts at escape were in vain. But later, as 
the time grew right, he used his specially cut, razor-sharp, pointed front tooth to cut 
his bindings. Chico was purposely let escape. Unknown to El Baron, Chico was a 
double agent! 

Once free, Chico went in search of El Baron with the hope that he himself 
might acquire the much wanted plan for El Baron's custom-made, super-destructive, 
infallible cap pistol. He found EJ Baron just awakening from his deep sleep. But 
by no tactful interrogation could he obtain the plan from El Baron. El Baron was be- 
coming suspicious. Chico knew then that to obtain the plan he must reveal to El Baron 
his double identity. He also knew that after obtaining the plan he would have to 
kill El Baron. 

So Chico turned to El Baron and said, "El Baron, I am a double agent. I am 
after the plan for vour custom-made, super-destructive, infallible cap pistol. Once I 
acquire it, I will kill you." 

To this discourse El Baron replied, "But of course, Chico. I understand. I can 
see how grieved you are to do this heinous crime." 

Thus Chico obtained the plan and killed El Baron. He reported to both agen- 
cies the details of the episode. Naturally each agency was given a slightly different 
version. 

Chico rose in position with both agencies until one day, while on a job, he 
met El Baron. Chico was sure that he had killed El Baron. 

El Baron stepped up to Chico and said, "You see, Chico, I am not dead. I was 
wearing my super-deluxe, inpenetrable, insulated underwear. The plan you obtained 
was a phony. And now, Chico, I am going to shoot you with mv custom-made, super- 
destructive, infallible cap pistol." BANG! 



Martha Chigas '67 



The Question 

What is love? 

What does this word mean? 

Is there any one word or 

Two words that can explain it? 

Does love just come to certain 

People, or does it come to evervone? 

Is there any way of knowing if 

Love has come to me? 



Donna Corroon '67 



ToD. 

Whv do vou continuallv fight me? 
Everything I say, you twist around. 
Do vou want me to be against vou . . . 
Is it your subconscious that makes you 
do as you do? 

-Am I too submissive — too agreeable? 

If so, I can change. 

Yet you yourself said, 

"I will not change and become 

a hypocrite for those who think me wrong." 

Have I ever asked you to change 

or be someone else? 

Then why expect me to do as such. . . . 

Maybe you 'Id like an enemy instead of a friend. 

If so, I'll leave vou — to vourself. 



Sandy Shipton '67 



Haiku 



The blind 

drifting now to dissonant sounds 
of arbitrary colors. 



A sprig of ivy 
crawls slowly 

towards the horizon 
of a desert. 



Happy blind child 
focusing temporarily 
on infinity. 



Once independent 

A raindrop slips warilv 

Into a puddle. 



Sheri Wickwire '67 



Kim Kirchmaier '68 



The Dive 

I jumped off the board. 

Whirling! Head up! Feet up! 

Wind in my ears. 

The water below was green, 

Now the sky — white 

Both were meeting my outstretched hands. 

Wet and cold — rush of motion — 

light above — green below 
A deep breath . . . 



Lorrie LaCour '68 



I Stand 

. . . watching on the wind with the grass and straw about mv feet. The 
wind, it moves only those which want to be moved, only those which are soft and 
non-resistant. All others, it leaves in its shadow as mere passings in a life from the 
first small whirlpool to the long path across the open field . . . then the rest in the 
valley, where it remains only a breeze— a breeze thought of only by a child at play 
in the grass. 

Debbie Gale '67 




The Trial 

A golden little mystery 

Stood by a small birch tree 

And wondered 

At a leaf, 

Plucked it, 

Pressed it to her cheek, 

And let it 

Flutter to the 

Faded grass. 

She then bent 

The sapling 

'Til it too was 

In the ebbing grass, 

And let it go 

To see if it would 

Spring back. 

Only, 

For some reason, 

When the tree quivered, 

As if to recoil, 

She turned away 

And could not watch 

As the growing treeling 

Slowly returned 

A little bit weaker 

Than before. 

Janet Kendall '67 




joai 



Les Exercices 

At Chateau Mont-Choisi, about two weeks after school started, "les exercices" 
started too. My dear mother had written a very polite letter to Madame P. asking 
her to make sure I attended "les exercices," not the required twice a week, but four 
times a week! When I found out about my mother's letter, my annoyance reached 
hysterical proportions. 

Alors, at 7:00 every morning, four times a week, I'd drag myself down to the 
basement. There a prancing little man awaited us. He was so nice to wake up to! 
He obviously enjoyed "les classes d'exercices" as much as we despised them. Half 
the girls stumbled into his "gymnase," clothes all twisted over their pajamas, looking 
as disgruntled as rebellious "demoiselles" could. 

My roommates were just as outraged as I was about my getting up early even' 
morning for this loathsome activity. If I could have skipped everv morning I would 
have, but our little pudgy friend always took role. Of course, I managed to get out 
of the torture once a month. A friend would mumble "indispose" when he sang out 
my name. Naturally, I was always very truthful. Some of the girls managed to be 
"indispose" all year 'round. 

Our mincing instructor insisted on giving us about five different kinds of 
exercises to, as he put it, "cultiver la buste." We would (of course, with smiling 
faces and great vitality) swing our arms in circles, frontwards and backwards, assum- 
ing all sorts of idiotic postures. With equal passion we performed "les exercices" for 
every part of the body. While we groaned and panted, he would march around the 
room cuddling his toy poodle, shouting, "un, deux, trois, un, deux, trois," and on 
and on ad nauseum. As he spat out these numbers with a smirk on his face, we 
would labor like the "bonnes fillettes" we were. Some of the bad fillettes, unlike me, 
would hide behind the piano or outside the doorway when he turned his back. I 
always resented those cowards. When they were discovered, I'd give a small snicker 
and gioat over their being driven back to slavery. 



Kathy Sullivan '67 



The Road Taken 

A fact, 

Soon to be an artifact. 

We march along, 

Some together . . . 

Mostly alone. 

The land stays rigid 

We must curve our bodies . . . 

Our minds. 

We curve until ends meet . . . 

Meet in a circle. 

They meet and there are no more roads to explore 

No more points to make contact with. 

One smooth road .... 

Already paved . . . 

With artifacts. 



Martha Parkinson '68 




Monologue 

(A classroom of ten or twelve seated students and a teacher; attention upon 
a standing figure.) 

Center figure: You all will learn someday but it is already too late to save you. 
(Cynically criticizing) You only mimic the words and thoughts before you . . . 
listening to and then breathing what you hear . . . The monotone baas of sheep . . . 
(mocking) baa, baa, baa. (With glorious conviction) I, the only real individual, now, 
charge you with your due punishment. (Moving to the head of the class; in a judicial 
tone) What I know you will half know, and then half enjoy, even understand less. 
(Drawing a horizontal line across the air) The significance of your lives is seen in the 
image of this line smothered by air. (In a confiding tone) I have questioned, judged 
and have found that I, in the glorious truth, go alone. I never followed the nature 
that is, but drew mv own life of a line not prey to air. (Extends a chalk line 
across the blackboard) (Triumphantly) I made a new image and how clearly it 
shows. I, a champion of knowledge, have taught myself well. (Marching with high 
steps to the victor)' beat in the air the figure leaves and closes the door of the empty 
room.) 



Prudy Allen '67 




Lunch 

The stampede begins. All the half-starved calves swarm into the dining 
room, practicallv trampling the head cattle in their path. The worn-out chairs sag 
under the assorted weights of their occupants. A tidal wave of morning gossip floods 
the room and then breaks into private conversations. Scents of the noonday feed 
escape the kitchen via the swinging door. The food is distributed, and the har- 
monious sounds of munching mouths fill the air. Gradually the bites and grunts 
diminish and satisfied silence prevails. The feeding done, small parts of the herd 
disperse— first slowly, then gathering momentum— trampling their leaders again in a 
frantic dash to the empty box. 

Jodi Landwehr '68 






Who's Real ? 

I don't drink. I'm crazy. I've got the opportunity. A girl, who came to visit 
me last fall for two days, wrote to say that she had not seen as much liquor in 
New York all summer as she had seen those two nights in Worcester. She thought 
it was disgusting the way the people in my town drink. It is. All her friends are on 
pot. 

Do you know what I get high on? Country roads, the color orange, stars and 
the moon, "The Mamas and Papas", skiing, sand and the waves. So why should I 
drink and see only a distorted glimpse of my addictions when I am near them. They 
all have one thing in common: beauty. 

The word "beauty" is like the word "wonderful"; they are both trite. There 
is nothing more wonderful than beauty. I could repeat that sentence over and over 
all day and mean it more every time I say it . . . and people would think I was 
crazy. I am. I don't drink— remember? 

Janet Kendall '67 



G-O-S-S-I-P 

Gossip is busybodies at work. 

Gossip is exaggerated ideas. 

Gossip is playing with people's feelings. 

Gossip is an afternoon pastime. 

Gossip is rarely true. 

Gossip is for the birds, 

because the cats go after them. 

Amy Whitehead '67 

The Fray 

The doors of war burst open 

Ejecting the soldiers onto the field. 

"Rush forward" is the cry 

As the battleground is covered 

With bodies marching onward 

Against the hostile crowd. 

Never surrendering an inch of pavement 

To the enemy; striking blows everywhere 

No one is wounded mortally in this bloody battle 

They charge blindly into and with the enemy 

On its way to the station. 

Lydia Deshler '67 



School Dances 

You're gathered in front of the piano. They are about twenty feet away, 
behind and around several chairs and tables. You fidget with your coat, gloves, rings, 
strands of hair drooping over your newly painted face (which took you at least an 
hour to create), the pearls hanging from your neck, and whatever else your clammy 
little hands could discover to preoccupy yourself with until that terrible and dreaded 
moment arrives. A few of the girls are clumped together, each stealing glances 
whenever possible and trying to decide who is the best looking boy there and then 
who will undoubtedly be her date. The stupid looking creep over there in the corner 
with the large glasses, with a nose to go with them, the greased down hair parted in 
the middle and, of course, the inevitable white socks, will obviously be yours for the 
entire night. But then you don't care whom you get, because you're IN LOVE with 
Johnny. Only reason why you even came to this dance was that your good buddie 
wouldn't go unless you did, and she has done so much for you, it's the least you could 
do for her in return! 

All of a sudden you are awakened from your dream-world and your Johnny 
by someone calling out your name. Taking a deep breath and affecting a careless 
sigh, you march forward. You're introduced— not bad. The petty conversation begins 
with name, address, grade and so forth. As the dance and time progress, he seems 
to become more appealing. He's the kind of boy Mother and Daddy would just 
love. He comes from an excellent background, you know. 

Unexpectedly the lights are turned back on! You blush. Arm and arm you 
begin to move towards the pile of coats, now on the floor. No words are spoken. 
What can one possibly say? There is so much you want to say and so little time to 
say it all in. Gradually you make your way to the door, and the sight of the awful 
buses hits you. Maybe there will be a flat tire— or the gas has leaked out of the 
tanks— or is that a snow cloud forming right overhead about to smother you all in an 
unimaginable amount of snow? No such luck! Here come your chaperones. He 
promises to write, you promise to answer, immediately. The last embrace and then 
vou float onto the bus and wave goodbye as the yellow blurb goes rolling out of the 
academy's gate. Suddenly comes a scream bellowing from your inner self-releasing 
emotions, frustrations, anxiety. You're really IN LOVE this time. There is no ques- 
tion about it. Plans have been made in regard to his weekend coming up in the near 
future, and then you'll be able to discuss more important matters: breaking the news 
to Mom and Dad, size of he ring, colleges vou '11 attend together, and whatever else 
people in love talk about. 

Johnny will have to understand. Anvway, you and Johnny were more or less 
just really good friends. Well, at least that's all you considered your relationship 
with him as. If he misinterpreted your feelings, that's his tough luck. Poor child, 
he'll recover in time. 

At last, you're IN LOVE, true love. In love with someone you've been with 
for a grand total of two hours, with whom you've exchanged petty tidbits about 
trivial topics which neither concerned nor interested either of you. You know next 
to nothing about his background, beliefs, religion, likes, dislikes, moods and so forth. 
But there will be time to place all of these insignificant pieces into the intricate 
puzzle of "LOVE." 

Sue Briggs '67 



Closed World 

The whole world was hemmed in that 
morning. It had snowed heavily the night before. 
The small timid animals shut themselves away 
from the rest of the world, crouching in their peep- 
holes. They would have used up too much energy 
if they had tried to push their way through their 
snow-filled entrances. They preferred to be shut 
in. And the people? The snow was piled up in 
front of their houses. It pushed against their 
doors, holding them inside with an awesome 
strength. They could not have escaped, at least 
not for a while. The people knew that they were 
closed in. They gave in to this idea, and simply sat behind drawn curtains. The 
houses themselves realized the predicament. The sky was gray and looked like a 
huge dome covering the earth. Yes, even the sky (usually so vast and unlimited) 
seemed to hang low, and close in the earth. This was one, big, smothered world; 
cut off, unaware of the wonders of space. 




JOO> 



Place Downey '68 



So Silent and Gay 

The world so silent 

and gay 

with wind pooling 

flakes 

into whirls, 

blowing dust from the shelves 
onto which the feathers float 

(One cannot follow 

with unconcentrated eye 
the curved path 
of 
the 
one 

snowflake.) 

Why not go out — 

to travel 
endangeringly 
adventurously 

into this world 
so silent, 

mysteriously hazardous. 



Martha Baker '67 




From the Depths 

From the depths of slumbering sleep 
I am thrust from unreality 
By the piercing sound of the bell, 
Which echoes down the corridor. 
The radio soothes my agitated soul. 

I am restored to serene peace 
By the overpowering drowsiness 
Enclosing my world so completely 
I never hear . . . 
The tragedy of the world. 



Lydia Deshler '67 



Apres les Vacances 

Nobody laughs 

Everyone cries 

Now they are all equal 

All have something in common — 

A miserable tear. 

Sliding backwards into the past 

Like idle fools, dreaming of days lost in time 

Instead of measuring the future 

With their own weight. 

Nobody laughs, except one. 

Have you laughed alone? 

It's fun — basically — 

Watching the golden children of heaven and hell 

Weeping together 

In common interest, 

Everyone for himself. 



Sandy Shipton '67 



I Watch 

... in wondering weariness those whirling circles which so long engulfed me 
in their thoughts. 

Tired of this washing, I lay to dry on the quiet shores . . . Short ripples, yet 
still they reel me. And in an attempt to laugh at this past horror which I alone have 
escaped, I cry in fear. For now in the ending of these circles they can only stop with 
no breaking off . . . 

No ending to say it is done . . . but just a slowing down of something I never 
began. 

Debbie Gale '67 




Reincarnation 

Life is an hour-glass. 
The grains of sand are days 
That slip through the 
Tunnel of time. 
They land one by one 
Quickly, to form a pile. 
Years are soon made. 
Life is lived. 
Joy and Sorrow 
Hatred and Love . . . 
And when there are no 
More grains to spend, 
The tunnel is silent, empty. 
But will there not be a 
Hand to turn the hour glass? 
To begin life once more. . . . 



Gretchen Valade '67 



Ambiguity 

a dog bone filled with nicotine ashes, 
the beauty of soot, 
hard silicone shell, 
crusted amphibious ideals 
weathered by salty tears of speed. 

red and blue sand, 

particles of people 

blurred by the foggy mist 

carried on the frothy white of the sea. 

a seagull's flight is steady, 
co-existing with waves of thought 
transmitted upon the wing. 

webbed feet parent a strange child 

in ripples of designed words, 

crushed in natural rock granite 

collected, 

for its beauty is maimed with common peasantry. 



Sheri Wickwire '67 




' 




iMidtaif& 



Dinacola's Vision 

I am an old man 
with grey hairs 

and all my senses dulled, 
except my memory. 

I recall a blood-spattered battleground, 
repulsive with the stench of rotten flesh. 

Toylike black cannons loom in the background; 
once destructive, now silent. 

In the air drifts the lingering gunsmoke 
and the gloom of approaching snow. 

Darkness will finally descend, 

but not forever — not yet. 
I am an old man 

living now in two worlds 
and perhaps forever. 



Martha Chigas '67 




The Song 

The song 

can't you hear 

twining through the grasses 

boundless in our maze 

Reverberating over a slow surging sea 
seeking out the wretched 
broken bodies, diseased minds, rise 
Listen, the song 

In the wind 

there's a song in the wind 
mellow air echoing its wail 
haunting, summoning to follow 

It's a wind for Loneliness 
for those in search 
of heart 
of liberty 
of love 

An existence in the wind 

I cast naked 

to the touch 

images for someone to search 

Solo bird soaring across the sky 
a song in the wind 
of Love on the wing 

I hear it distantly 

droning inwardly with a promise 

there's a wind 
with a song 
of Love 

In the wind 

there's a song 

of wonder, of doubt, 

proclaiming 

you will be loved 

and your love will Live. 



Beth Bullock '68 



Passage to Nihilism 

Words fall on sensitive flesh 

And adhere themselves to blistered veins, 

Driving the life blood blindly to a morbid 

purpose. 
Crimson rushes down, crushes, and destroys 

reason defended by the 

grasping tissue of the mind. 

Martyred bv flames, flaunting firey flesh, 
Choking reason finds profound purpose in 

living flesh. 
Veins explode again flooding the fire-tortured 

mind, 
And reason for destruction is drowned by a 

crimson enemv feeding the mind's 

fire. 

From the zenith to the nadir, fire's red smothers 

the fuel of reason, 
And cools, washes, and cleans the dead tissue. 
Red dries brown and seals as a coffin, 
Hiding wounds with new flesh and new purpose, 

oblivious to reason, 

indifferent to pain. 



Prudy Allen '67 



The Bed Away 

Wet foam, rolling over on its bed of sand; 

retreating, leaving a glossy sheet of shining pebbles, 

finds comfort in dissolving into warm green drops which expand 

making an endless coverlet of water. 



Place Downey '68 



v 




The Bird 

A large, ominous spot is roughly outlined against the clear, placid blue of 
the sky. It remains stationary, perched high upon a limb of a tree. It begins to take 
some form as I approach, and I can see the brown-grey feathers spread across his 
body, varied only by a few splotches of white at the tips. His beady black eyes glare 
down hatefully upon me, and his sharp, fierce beak moves slightly as if being 
sharpened. He clings with his feet upon the tree, clawing the rough bark as he 
files his toenails into sharp points. Suddenly, with no warning, his wings spread out 
across the sky on either side of him, covering the world with his black ugliness. The 
sound of flapping wings thunders above me, and a blast of wind causes me to 
quaver as he soars away. 



Nancy Smith '68 



Meditation 

An insignificant mass of 
organic matter — filling a 
minute interval of that 
abstract theory of time with 
restless ponderings of what 
existence is really made 
of that should make it so 
prized — only to realize in 
the last few precious particles 
of life, that it is 
nothing more than the 
expectation of death. 



Gayle DeBell '67 



Stagnant Winter 

the roses are dead 

and lay beside the white sand 

where no green plant has ever grown 

and trees emerge from within a wave 
yellow leaves replace the dead roses 
at the bottom of an oak 

roses fear the frost and the frost fears the sun 

and purple penguins waddle across the frozen earth 

burying the autumn leaves 

and beauty is not contained in the autumn leaves, 
dead to vou? 



no! 

i'm not dead and vou can't see me. 



Sheri Wickwire '67 



Cinquains 



A bud 

On slender stem 

Did soak in drops of rain 

And grew and blossomed into a 

Flower. 



Challis Walker '67 



Gawky 

young insurgents 

used as cannon fodder 

in the marshes of Vietnam, 

ensnared. 



Martha Chigas '67 



Fathom 

The depths unseen 

Ease not the steady keel 

Nor forsake the forgotten folk, 

And cease. 



Lydia Deshler '67 



Myself 
with you away 
left as half when apart 
and halves are still nothing until 
made whole. 



Debbie Gale '67 



Where Is Spring ? 

When the leaves softly abandon their trees, 
What are the trees left with? 

When flowers lose all their glorious sunshine 

and warmth, 
What remains? 

The trees have nothing except their bare limbs, 

outstretched and waiting. 
Only spring will end their loneliness. 

Flowers lose everything and droop their heads 

in sorrow. 
Only spring will make them stand erect, 
Bursting with beauty and life. 

Here I stand, listening to silent footsteps and 
Watching a small, faint figure slowly 

disappear. 
I am left empty and I, too, droop in sorrow. 
Where is Spring? 



Gretchen Valade '67 







■rif- 



,<*^' 



X 



V 




Sea Impressions 

The soft grey haze rose 
slowly from the mottled 
brown cliffs. 

The shrill cry of a seagull 
was audible in the 
distance as the cool, briny, 
mist touched the shore with 
her bracing fingertips. 
The buoy rocked mildlv 
and methodically in the 
stillness of the sea as 
the beacon from the 
lighthouse glimmered through 
the vagueness of the 
morning dawn. 



Gayle DeBell '67 



Surrounded 

We were surrounded 
And no place to go 
Up — only windows 
Down — only floors. 

The siren then blew 
And everyone hurried 
Straight as sticks 
To be counted. 

J. C. would be missing 
and the guard would be mad 
Her number was 83 
And mine was 3 more. 



I took a deep breath 
And listened to all 
61 ... 72 ... 82 . . 
Where was J. C? 



84 




There was a commotion 
And guards hurried out 
The first place to look 
Was the kitchen's back room. 

Just after they left 
Another guard appeared 
Carrying a note 
From the head R. N. 

The counting continued 
To everyone's amaze 
J. C. was excused 
No mark for her today. 

Finally it was finished 
And now to our work 
Of cutting down trees 
And chopping the wood. 



Mandy Crocker '67 



- 




The Grecian Affair 



-.■ — 



Vassilius lifted his stocky body from the 
lounge chair and dove into the pool. His black 
curly hair and deeply tanned neck were barely 
visible from where I lay. The sun penetrated my 
skin and made tiny beads of perspiration form on 
my brow and between my fingers. Greece is hot 
in the summer. 

I mumbled something to Vassilius when he 
returned, dribbling cold water on my back. Not 
understanding me, he inquired, "Te?", but caught 
himself and said, "Whor?" 

"It's not important. Forget it, Bill." 
Vassilius liked to be called Bill. I preferred 
to say Vassily: foreign names are always much 
more romantic. He both hated and admired Ameri- 
cans. American girls were rich and lazy in Vassily's opinion. I fancied myself, an American, neither 
rich nor lazy. On this note our relationship began. 

Vassily took Aristea, my Greek companion, and me to the beach in his fast black Volvo. His 
car had a beige and gray leather interior and American safetv belts. Vassily was very proud of it. A 
copy of Playboy lay on the back seat. We raced through the traffic of Athens southward to the sea- 
shore. He had his arm around me while we talked of America; he hoped that someday he might see 
San Francisco. 

Vassily spoke with a slight accent, and like all Greeks feigned not to comprehend fully what 
I said. Although I was sure he understood English perfectly, there was a certain mystery about Vas- 
sily. One was never sure of what he understood or thought. We frequently spoke in French or bro- 
ken Greek. He was stubborn and refused to let American culture dominate him; yet, he was eager 
to meet Americans. Occasionally he and Aristea would exchange knowing looks. 

The beaches near Athens are beautiful. On the white sand are many brightly colored um- 
brellas with striped cabanas in the background. There is an international flavor that distinguishes 
the beaches from those of Southern California. Moreover, the blueness of the Mediterranean cannot 
be duplicated. The men and women wear bikinis, speak many tongues, and laugh and live freely. 
Vassily and I found an orange umbrella while Aristea went for a swim. As Aristea emerged 
from the blue sea, 1 realized how truly Greek she looked. Her nose was straight in the fine Grecian 
style, her eyes and hair black. She was heavily proportioned through her shoulders and arms as are 
most of the women; they are born to heavy labor and childbearing. Her skin was richly bronzed. 
As she moved toward us, Vassilv smiled. 

As we left Astir Beach, Vassily opened the door for me and indicated the back seat. I tried 
speaking to both Vassily and Aristea in French, but they paid little attention. We drove home si- 
lently. I was confused. 

I saw Aristea the next day, but did not see Vassilius for another week. When we finally did 
meet, he greeted me in Greek, shaking my hand. He turned and politely walked away. Then I knew. 
I was a stranger. Here everyone spoke Greek. 



Catherine Cowles '67 




The Feast 

Trees, following each step made by the un- 
sure man, walking about in the untouched snow, 
among untouched people, wading into non-exis- 
tence for split moments, falling out as the curb 
goes beneath him. The little lady, with the white 
teeth and large smile swallows him up, and he 
falls once more to the bottom of her smile. And 
they all laugh at the ladies' club meeting the 
following week. 

Debbie Gale '67 



■ 



Little Rogue 



little rogue 

hated little rogue 

loved only by the image of yourself 

diagnose ugliness 

give of yourself into the puzzle of hatred. 

silhouette your shadow, with that of the deceased, 

into a perpendicular hell 
stab the heaven with a black cross 
as you stand at the end of an avenue of forests, 

which stretches from the concrete floor of your cell. 

now a white man 
cut and bleeding 

because you asked for no more than a tendril of wheat 
what are you made of gray oner 
being a carving there must be worship, 
who has molded a person, corrupted? 
a loving God? 
if there be any intimacy 

can it not break through porous stalks? 
there is always a path of escape. 

no, sanguinary man 
the corn is green 
and minds are dank 

because the sun won't penetrate dandelion stalks 
blades of grass won't grow beneath a coffin of dying respect 
and no one listens to your plea 
because nature is deaf and dumb. 



Sheri Wickwire '67 



Monday 

Anger wells inside me, gaining momentum. 
Waves of madness break, surging forward, 
a mist of nigrescence covers me, and, 
—There is no health in us. 

Color splatters on mv canvas brain in shapes: 
fade pyramids 

vermillion cones 

sooty contours. 
A thought of refuge engulfs me; yes, 
—Blessed are the peacemakers. 

Relief steals over me, lulling my rage. 
Calm soothes the truant, kissing its teeth. 
The delinquent sleeps to awaken, 
—For thine is the kingdom. 



Catherine Cowles '67 




(#— 




Lonely Race 

The boy wove down the dock accompanied by the sound of the choppy water 
slapping against the dock posts. Dazedly he gazed at his boat across the harbor. 
He felt tense, pulled taught like a rope. He seethed inwardly because his sailing 
crew had decided they did not want to race that day. At the same time he wanted to 
cry. The anger drove him to spite and he was soon straining on the oars against the 
powerful beat of the waves. He was going to sail in the race even if he had no crew. 

The boy tacked out of the harbor. Once past the breakwater he realized how 
rough the sea actually was. The vast silt-colored ocean stretched out with no ending 
while silver crests broke from the mellow covered surface. Reflecting the sea, the 
sky shrouded most of the light. The sun shone slightly, a hazy ball of a lighter 
media of grey. 

The race began with the rolling thunder of the starting cannon. Once across 
the starting line the boats formed a nearly single line and the boy took his place in 
the middle. 

He who had previously felt the cold wind down his windbreaker began to feel 
steamingly hot. A sweat broke out over his body and his tanned face grew pale. 
The wind drove the breaking crests up the deck and the freezing water slid into the 
cockpit. The tiller pulled away and the boy used all his strength to hold it in line. 
Still worse was the strain of the sheet. Repeatedly he grasped the rope with all his 
power but it would slowly slip from his hand. Finally he wound it around a cleat 
once to help intercept much of the pull. 

The wind was blowing a gale and the bow dipped deeply into the water. 
Floor boards and boat supplies floated around the cockpit and the boy's clothes were 
completely sodden. The sheet was now also wrapped around his lower arm and its 
tug drew blood. The red fluid dripped down his arm, trickled from his clenched fist 
and diffused into the separate ocean in the cockpit. His wet salty clothes rubbed 
irritatingly against his cold body. The salt stung his hands with piercing sharpness 
and he whimpered in pain. Each limb, muscle, and bone ached. The world spun 
around in blurred confusion. He groaned in agony under the unrelenting torture. 

At last as the boat ran at a broad reach, the bow plunged once too deeply 
and the boat became engulfed by water. The wooden craft scattered across the 
surface and the water washed over the semi-floating hull. The boy gagged for breath, 
thrashing in the churning water. The roar of the crash boat cut through his panic. 
Rapidly the rescuers hauled his fever-stricken body from the water. 

Beth Bullock '68 




1 r Si*.' . 



Tourist Typical 

Let us follow a typical tourist. We shall 
begin with his disembarking from the plane and 
then follow as he begins his journey through a 
foreign land. So . . . Onward Christian Soldier! 

Our two-legged friend is first distinguish- 
able by his snow-white tan and the sunglasses 
perched on top of his head as he mills hopelessly 
through the terminal, weighted down by unneces- 
sary luggage, tennis rackets, guitars, sleeping bags, 
and whatever else he could carry or get into the 
suitcases without their being overweight. 

In a secluded, but now crowded, corner of 
the aeroport, are paper cups filled with some form 
of alcoholic liquid. After sampling several of these 
unique little tidbits, Tommy Tourist comes to the 
conclusion that this undoubtedly must be an exotic native creation. He begins to discuss the mysteri- 
ous, enchanting ingredients of this drink with a fellow bystander. What our comrade does not know 
is that this "exotic" beverage has inevitably been imported from the States. 

At last a taxi is hailed and the tourist's vacation has officially begun. The sunglasses are 
readjusted and the driver of the cab is fired with numerous questions in regard to his native land. 

Once settled at a hotel, our tourist friend decides to emerge into the streets and add to the 
state of anarchv which alreadv exists. With camera in hand and typical high-heeled, white P.F. 
flyers and matching ventilated nylon socks, he struts up and down the narrow streets. Coming 
upon a native shop, he goes in and eventually comes out with a straw hat and a hideous native print 
shirt. If our friend is the adventurous and daring specimen of Typical Tourist, he'll undoubtedly 
decide to rent a self-drive car (better known to the natives as a sudden-death car). He'll definitely 
have to have a sports car and this will have to be a convertible and, by the time he returns this help- 
less piece of machinery, the muffler will be gone and the rest of the car will be suffering from an 
incurable disease known as body rot, acquired by being immersed in several feet of salt water. 

The night life of Tourist Typical tends to be rather long and 'overdone,' to say the least. 
The newcomers to a popular nightclub are always noticeable since they are the loudest in the audi- 
ence. While on the dance floor, Tourist Typical is at first a bit awkward and unsure of himself, but 
gradually he learns the movements of the native dance and considers himself a veteran. He's always 
the last to leave, and on his way out manages to purchase all the M.C.'s latest and oldest albums . . . 
something for him to play during his next bridge game with the Smiths once he gets back home. 
The morals of Tourist Typical seem to take a considerable drop as soon as he is away from his native 
land and able to shut off all reality. He is easily persuaded into going over the hill to one of the 
"quaint" little native shows . . . time, 3:30 a.m. 

The vacation comes to an end and old T.T. is faced with a rude awakening. The taxi ride to 
the aeroport is somewhat reversed now. Our friend seems to be telling the driver about his island. 
He is still weighted down with luggage, except now it's about twenty pounds more: things for the 
kids, neighbors, dog, boss and so forth. 

A mad dash is made and the duty-free quart of liquor is bought and neatly and inconspicu- 
ously placed among the wet bathing suits wrapped in a straw bag. 

The major topic of conversation is usually in regard to the weather that he is leaving and the 
weather that he will shortly face. The long, tedious walk to the plane begins and, before boarding 
the big bird, a last sweeping glance is stolen, a wild attempt to fit the past two weeks' escapades 
into a six-second look. 

The sunglasses are again readjusted over a Noxema-covered nose. Tourist Typical is home- 
ward bound. 



Sue Briggs '67 



The Mourn After 

Alan: Having trouble, Big Brother? 

Rod: I let her drive last night. 

Alan: One thing I like about you, B.B., you really know how to handle your women. 

Rod: I've never gone through anything like it before. 

Alan: Real rough, eh Herkie? 

Rod: Transmission blown, a flat, wheels out of alignment . . . 

Alan: Expensive date! 

Rod: I can't afford her anymore. 

Alan: Wise deduction. 

Rod: Nothing's as expensive as a woman. 

Jodi Landwehr '68 



"I Now Pronounce You House and Spouse" 

Beneath a pointless tree 
of fingered strands 
huddle paper dolls 
of non-entity. 
Dolls of glad-wrap 
and birthday paper 
who watch the wind 
whistle and carry them 
to their places of disbelief . . . 
Dolls with staring eyes 
of emptiness who hunger 
for relief from painted lips 
and gaily colored dresses 
and permanent puff hair . . . 
But they sigh and dance 
merrily on to the tune 
of man. 



Debbie Gale '67 




The Saturday Night Supper 

History was being made and the 
child was there in the center of the Hutch- 
ville Communal Activity Gathering. All 
those little wimps running around were 
his direct associates in the intricate plans 
of childhood deceit. The knee-highs pro- 
ceeded to saw half-way through the legs 
of the after-dinner bridge tables and to 
fill alternate sugar bowls with salt. 

The "white sale" packages were 
confiscated and that didn't matter for it's 
the thought that counts. The wide-eyed 
children of the Far East will survive on 
the goodness contained in souls. 
It was fate that an alcoholic keg and match fell in the baby grand and burned 
a score of burlap diaper bags. The music was reduced to a crude form of uninhibited 
expression, which echoed the character and passion of the "drag and dairy" farmers. 
The fiddle played a solo titled "He Only Lives Who Enjoys Life" as another bottle 
of home distilled liquor was thrown over someone's shoulder into the fireplace. Arms 
were locked in a simultaneous plea for a fertile, rainy season. 

Somebody's fur was matted with tomato soup and so well blended with the 
bearskin wall-to-wall carpeting that the guest list was checked to see if any of the 
senior citizens had croaked during the course of the festivities. But men don't worry 
about a heart failure; they are worried about the idea of a heart failure. All the 
toothless grins were excusing their in-laws for their short comings. 

A clumsy ox tripped over a Greek statue, which was semi-formulated from an 
original, used in last year's production of Antigone. 

And the background and foundation of social liberties was incorporated into 
alphabet soup, digested and released in verbal images at the head of the banquet table. 



Sheri Wickwire '67 



Twice Given 



I am cold, 
The mist hangs 
heavy about my eyes. 
I slip from day 
to night 
missing sun rays. 

and grope 

not in vain 

for the Tagged root— 

my last chance. 

I grasp 
unsure- 
strength returns 
my feet steady. 

I lift my eyes 
and walk. 
The sun is warm 
on my face. 



Linda Lovejoy '67 




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Phone 474-3341 



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D 



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Sporty^ 





A«* 




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Lowell, Mass. 



BLANCHARD CHARTERED SERVICE, INC. 

owned and operated by 
ALVIN T. FRENCH 



Tewksbury 



SPLINTERS 



Best Wishes to the Class of '67 

THOMAS F. C0RR00N, LTD. 

INSURANCE 

7 THE PLAZA, LOCUST VALLEY, N.Y. 
(516) 676-2200 



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Lowell, Mass. 



Wigs by 



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45 Merrimack Street Tel. 458-6331 



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PRINCE'S 

Stationers - Booksellers - Gifts 
Typewriters - Greeting Cards 



96-104-108 MERRIMACK ST. 



LOWELL, MASS. 




SPANISH CLUB '67 





Compliments of 


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POST OFFICE 
LOCKSMITH 




A. M. JEKNAVORIAN 


Compliments of 


Compliments of 


EASTERN SERVICE CO. 


THE SCOTT JEWELRY CO. 


Frigidare Sales & Service 


60 Merrimack St. 
corner of Central St. 


238 Shaw St. LOWELL, MASS. 


LOWELL, MASS. 


(Phone GL 3-3979) 





SPLINTERS 



Portraits by 

BENRIMO 



Friends together can make 
a little world, warm 
with love and delight, 
and nothing makes so close 
a bond as the gift of a 

Beautiful Portrait 



OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPHER, ROGERS HALL CLASS OF 1967 



FOR APPOINTMENT CALL STUDIO 
3S CHURCH STREET 
PArkvicw 9-4232 
WINCHESTER, MASS. 



SPLINTERS 



ALBERT RICHARDS CO., Inc 




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Plumbing, Heating, Farm Supplies 
60 Fletcher Street LOWELL, MASS. 



HIGHLAND LAUNDRY 
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Same day service 
when requested 



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FRIENDLY ICE CREAM SHOP of Lowell 

CENTRAL SHOPPING PLAZA 
KEEP ACQUAINTED 452-8727 




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Insurance since 1865 

Lowell, Chelmsford, Littleton 

in ANDOVER the Smart & Flagg Agency 



Compliments of 



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600 Rogers St. on Rt. 38 Lowell, Mass. 
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PHONE 475-4821 



OLDE ANDOVER VILLAGE 



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Motors - Automatic Transmission 
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LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 01852 



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Compliments of the 



HOLIDAY INN 



INTERVALE, NEW HAMPSHIRE 



Compliments of 

PARADISE DONUTS 



MT. PLEASANT 
SPRING WATER CO., INC. 

Steadman St. LOWELL, MASS. 

Tel. 459-9041 



One hundred twenty-six years 
a prescription store 

F. and E. BAILEY & CO. 

Prescription Specialists 

79 Merrimack St. 19 John St. 

Lowell, Mass. 



SPLINTERS 











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Compliments of 



MATTHEW MILAN 

— Designer and Maker of Fine Jewelry 



Rm. 317 Washington Bldg. 
Liberty 2-3117 



387 WASHINGTON ST. 
BOSTON 8, MASS. 




■the V,h- Mtwrives 



JOHNSTON'S BAKERY 

295 Westford St. 
LOWELL, MASS. 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



E. A. WILSON CO 



700 Broadway 



Lowell; Massachusetts 



FUELS 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



BROX'S DAIRIES 



STANLEY C. MARSDEN 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

43 Livingston Ave. GLenview 2-4482 

Lowell 

Heating & Cooling Equipment 
— Fuels — 
D. T. SULLIVAN CO., INC. 

1012 GORHAM ST. TEL GL 4-7857 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 




The 

Garrison 

Shop 



194 MERRIMACK STREET, LOWELL, MASS. 





Compliments of 


DIAMOND TAXI 


BRADT BAKERY, INC. 




BAKERS OF FINE CRACKERS 


128 Warren St. 


Since 1833 


Lowell, Mass. 


Whiting St. Lowell, Mass. 



UNITED RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT 



297 CENTRAL ST. 



LOWELL, MASS. 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 

RUSSELL LUMBER CO. 



RIVERSIDE POTATO SERVICE, INC. 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 




s* ~_*v 




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f __ _ . 

TO 4*\€ Seniors w*QiVe ovr^rtos-t-H^ -f^^^'P, Cto x "*> 





SPLINTERS 



Sonne Chance. 
ou.\oicrs 
Us 
few me S 




O'CONNOR & HILL HARDWARE 



460 Lawrence Street 



LOWELL, MASS. 



Compliments of 

GENE'S HI GRADE 
ICE CREAM 



GAUMONT BROS., INC. 

"Where Television and Appliances 
are a specialty . . , 
not just a sideline" 



39 Kearney Sq. 
opposite the P.O. 



455-5656 






SPLINTERS 



u 





SPLINTERS 




miQHjKs c/JXDies 

449<-MapletontAve., Suffield, Conn. 15B Soutb^Main Street, West Hartford, Qann. 







"For Better Health Eat More Fish" 




DEB/\TF 
CLUB 


W. J. HOARE 

Wholesale and Retail 
Fresh Fish, Oysters, Clams, Lobsters, etc. 




461 Lawrence St. LOWELL, MASS. 


' 




Dial 2-3571 




Compliments of 




PUTNAM & SON 


207 MARKET ST. 


LOWELL, MASS. 




JANE TOOHER 



Sports Clothes, Inc. 

598 COLUMBIA RD. DORCHESTER, MASS. 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



GEORGE F. FISHER, INC 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 

Town House Motel 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 




SPLINTERS 



E. C. Pearson Painting Co., Inc. 

Harold A. Linstad, Prop. 
Interior Decorators and Painting Contractors 



IMPORTED and DOMESTIC 
WALLPAPERS 



PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES 
AND ENAMELS 



90 HAMPSHIRE STREET 



LOWELL, MASS. 



EVERYONE'S FORD DEALER 




MOTOR SALES INC. 



LOWELL 




Compliments of 



DRS. WILLIAM R. PEPIN, SR. 
and W. REID PEPIN 



SPLINTERS 




A. A. SMITH & CO., INC. 



Est. 1906 

Authorized Dealers Olivetti Underwood 

Sales • Service • Rentals 

34 Central Street LOWELL, MASS. 

GL 7-7481 





OO 




Luc K 



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>> 



SPLINTERS 




SHERATON 
ROLLING GREEN MOTOR INN 

. GIFT SHOP 

• 100 BEAUTIFUL GUEST ROOMS 

• INDOOR AND OUTDOOR POOLS 

• DINING ROOM FEATURING A 

FRIDAY NIGHT BUFFET 

• COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



JCT. 133 and 93, ANDOVER 



TEL. 475-5400 



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SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



THE STUDENT COUNCIL 



MOTEL CASWELL 



WOOD-ABBOTT CO. 



Established 1872 



Diamond Merchants and Jewelers 



75 MERRIMACK STREET 



LOWELL, MASS. 




THE BARROWS TRAVEL 
SERVICE, INC. 

420 Hildreth Building 

45 Merrimack St. LOWELL, MASS. 

459-9319 



SPLINTERS 



Best Wishes from the 




I 



«*f%? 



SJ-i r.! 4& dU» ' 




Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



SPLINTERS 



Get It At 

Parkway Prescription Pharmacy 

James J. Queenan, Reg. Ph. 
309 ROGERS ST. - LOWELL, MASS. 

Free Delivery Phone GL 4-4831 




oj&er/so/i's 



FURNITURE-RUGS 

€U> 1886 



LOWELL'S LARGEST furniture store for 80 years 



JOSEPH E. STAVELEY 

Plumbing and Heating 

STEAM, GAS & WATER SYSTEMS 



Residence 
Westford Road Shop 

Chelmsford 490 Chelmsford St 
Dial 2-3741 Lowell, Mass. 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



^,<zMa& SoticA, lac. 



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inters 



Rogers Hall School 

.Lowell, .Massacnusetts 




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SPLINTERS 

Editor-in-Chief 
Prudence Allen 



Martha Chigas 
Catherine Cowles 
Lydia Deshler 



Literary Board 



Deborah Gale 
Janet Kendall 
Sherill Wickwire 



Martha Baker 
Marian Crocker 



Business Board 
Manager— Challis Walker 



Amy Whitehead 



Sandra Hall 
Sandra Shipton 



Martha Fisher 



Art and Photography 
Editor— Gayle DeBell 



Lynda Pryor 



Faculty Literary Advisor 
Mrs. Banks S. Worsham 



Faculty Art Advisor 
Mrs. John Perloff 






".:'- "■:.■■ 




EDITORIAL 

The problems created by the complexities of modern living must be 
resolved. We are quickly becoming the members of society responsible for 
the task of providing a humanitarian solution to the twentieth century 
enigma. The unbridged gaps caused by man's intricate psyche, scientific 
achievement, and diverse ideologies require greater communication among 
men, protection from fears of total destruction, and removal of prejudices. 

The acuteness of our responsibility is evident in the revolutionary spirit 
of our generation. We have shaken off much of the stifling influence of 
Victorianism, and we have witnessed the evolution of a drive for freedom 
of expression and for destruction of superficial barriers between peoples. 
This is the motivation behind such movements as the Boston Common 
"be-in" and "love-in" this year. The spirit of such a seemingly superficial 
movement has been converted into positive action by many youths joining 
organizations like the Peace Corps or Great Society programs. Such youth- 
ful gestures, sometimes held suspect by the older generation, hold the answer 
to the world dilemma— an answer fundamental to Christianity and explored 
by such authors as E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, and Alan Paton: uni- 
versal love or, at least, universal tolerance. This solution has hope of adop- 
tion if we too can begin to respond to the responsibilities of correcting social 
problems and do not fall into apathy. 

We must fill the gaps with our own spirit, with an open mind sensitive 
to the needs around us. We can not waste a spirit with misdirected visions 
of ourselves. We can not fail to communicate by isolating ourselves in a 
narrow, valueless world like that of Arthur Miller's Willie Loman. Ours is 
a free atmosphere welcoming doers, demonstrators, and innovators prepared 
for a new life and responsible thinking. 






i 



Miss Hildred Ramsay 
Headmistress of Rogers Hall 



TO THE MEMBERS OF THE SENIOR CLASS 

I have never forgotten the words of my commencement 
speaker at Smith College, though the identity of the man 
himself eludes me. Perhaps when my name has begun to slip 
your memory, you too will retain the echo of these words: 

We have given you a thousand horses; 
it is for you to fut the riders thereon. 




MRS. JOHN PERLOFF 



DEDICATION 

To you, Mrs. Perloff, who has instilled in us a love of 
the true and the imaginary, inspired us with creative energy, 
and braved our traumas with sympathy, we give devoted and 
sincere thanks. We have dedicated ourselves to following 
your example of growth in the search for greater understand- 
ing in fine art and in the art of living. Thus, we dedicate a 
product of our efforts to you— Mrs. P.— with appreciation. 



#r rffifnetictfitot 




Mrs. Charlotte Knowles Bentley 



Mrs. Bentley, we know that every Rogers Hall girl, both past and present, would 
like to express gratitude to vou for the sincere interest you have always shown in 
our education. It is for us, the class of '67, to speak to you directlv and to tell you that 
we have missed you greatly and that we appreciate the energy, in and out of class as 
teacher and friend, that you devoted to us. 



A teacher affects eternity. 

He can never tell where influence stofs, 

— Henry Brooks Adams 



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in 

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Mrs. Charlotte Knowles Bentley 
biology and chemistry 



111 Miss Anne Dorland Pulling 

**% SPANISH AND FRENCH 

1 i 



Mrs. Nina Latour 
shorthand and typing 



Miss Carol Robinson 

HISTORY, LIBRARIAN, 
ACADEMIC SECRETARY 



Mrs. Frances Jones 
alumnae secretary 




Miss Dorothy Phelps 

latin, french and 

ancient history 

Miss Doris Alexander 
mathematics 

Miss Dorothy A. LeButt 

piano, glee club and 

music appreciation 




Mrs. Louise Whitten Staten Mrs. Barbara Calhoun 
secretary financial secretary 



Mrs. Minnie Colpitts, RN 

RESIDENT NURSE 





Mrs. M. Sargent 

HOUSEMOTHER 

Mrs. B. Crosbie 

DIETICIAN 

Mrs. A. Jones 

HOUSEMOTHER 



Miss Janet Landis 

ENGLISH 



Mrs. Pamela Hoffer 

FRENCH 



Mr. George Conger 
mathematics and chemistry 





Miss Carol Bowes 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND PHYSIOLOGY 



Miss Nancy Dion 

HISTORY AND 
CURRENT EVENTS 




Mrs. Dorothy I. Perloff 

ART AND HISTORY OF ART 

Mrs. Dorothy A. Worsham 

ENGLISH AND DRAMATICS 




Mrs. Louise Downes 

BIOLOGY 








. ........ 





La Cucarachal 



Lovely dayl 







v 



* 



Come out, come out wherever you are! 




Pretty, huh? 




We've got to get out of this flace! 



I thought I saw a jnicldy tat 




"Do you see . . ." what I see? 




Who dat when ah say 'Who dat'? 





'I've got one at home." 




It sticks to your teeth; not to your hands! 




You see, there was this perfectly 
ordinary-looking clam . . . 



1 am the keeper of this inn 



The future enters into us in order 
to transform itself in us long hefore 
it happens. 

— Ramer Maria Rilke 



The knowledge comes . . . 

The wisdom lingers . . . 

—Tennyson 



Perhaps the most valuable outcome of an education is 
to have learned to accept the fact that a job must be done 
and to do it, whether pleasant or unpleasant. 



-Sandy Hall 






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Senior Class Officers 

President Sandy Hall 

Vice-President Donna Corroon 




*. 



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.«/ 



PRUDENCE JANE ALLEN 

Dutch Road R.D. #2 
Fairview, Pennsylvania 

Pennsylvania State College 

Editor of Splinters 



"Prudence is the footprint of wisdom." 



CAE Club 

Hockey 1 (2nd team), 2, 3, 4 

Basketball 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 

Volleyball 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 

Water Ballet 3, 4 

Swimming 2, 3, 4 

Cheerleading 1, 2, 3, 4 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Dramatics 4 

Debate Club 4 (president) 

Instauration 2, 3 (Editor) 

Splinters Literary 4 (Editor) 

Class President 1 

Proctor 3, 4 

Honor Roll 1, 2, 3, 4 

Current Events Prize 3 

Dramatics Prize 4 

Current Events Prize 4 

RH Award 4 



The U.S. Marines . . . the world— her 
stage . . . Boston in the fall (835) . . . 
Would vou like to see our library 1 ? . . . 
Would you believe ...}... Danny Boy 
. . . It's going to be an all-nighter . . . hap- 
tic artist . . . and Prudv cooked . . . yoga 
and orange -juice . . . next year . . . you 
know ... P. D. A. S. 







MARTHA CASWELL BAKER 

138 Brigham Hill Road 
North Grafton, Massachusetts 




University of London 



"Sleeper" of the class ... art work on the 
desks . . . peculiar letters . . . untied shoe 
laces! Who cares . . . mandolin . . . going 
to Andover . . . "Grandolff" spends the 
night at R. H. . . . Mards . . . 7th period 
study hall— What fun! ... off to London 
. . . the Wright kind of boy . . . Pigeons 
in Boston . . . Sky-walker earrings. 




"He who is of a calm and happy nature will hardly 
feel the pressure of age." 



KAVA Club 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 (President) 

Ski Club 2, 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 4 

Octet 4 

Senior Fair Committee 4 

Fathers' Dav Committee 

Proctor 4 

Water Ballet Committee 2, 3, 4 

Hockey 3 (2nd team), 4 

Volleyball 4 (2nd team) 

Basketball 3, 4 

Softball 3, 4 

Music Appreciation 4 (Honorable Mention) 




HILLARY ANITA BARTON 

658 Nimes Road 
Los Angeles, California 

University of California 
in Los Angeles 



"You have done it by being yourself; perhaps that 
is what being a friend means after all." 



KAVA Club 

Hockey 2, 3 (2nd team), 4 

Volleyball 1, 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 

Basketball 3 (2nd team), 4 

Water Ballet 1, 2, 4 

Softball 1 (2nd team), 2 

Swimming (Manager) 3, 4 ■ 

Tennis Team 1, 2 

Badminton Team 3 

Ski Club 1 

Cheerleading 3, 4 

Prom Committee 4 

R.H. Award 2, 4 



Over the Hill . . . U. S. C. Nobody loves 
me . . . STUCK on French . . . California 
Hillbilly . . . Nancy Nurse . . . "Today is 
NOT my day." WOMAN! Are you a 
peach, prune, alfalfa, or apricot of his 
intestines?? . . . Rabbit . . . "Do you believe 
in magic?" . . . "Well excuse me!" 




KJ '•'' 



DORIS JEAN BELL 

26 Crescent Road 
Riverside, Connecticut 

Marjory Webster Junior College 




Bones . . . "Oh, give me a break!" I was a 
Rogers Hall Reject . . . FLIP . . . don't 
flunk . . . physi! ... I couldn't eat another 
thing. Sparrow . . . Portchester, New 
York ZIPPY DOOO!!!! Sin City, U.S.A. 



"It's better to have loved and lost than never to 
have loved at all." 





CAE CLUB 

Cheerleading 2, 3, 4 
Hockey 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 
Swimming 2, 3, 4 
Water Ballet 2, 3, 4 
Basketball 2, 3 (2nd team), 4 
Baseball 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 
Volleyball 3, 4 (Captain) 
Tennis 3 
Badminton 3, 4 
Ski Club 3 
R.H. Award 2, 3, 4 
Dramatics 3, 4 
Badminton Cup 4 







"To me the meanest flower that blows can give 
thoughts that do often lie too deep for tears." 



KAVA Club 

Volleyball 3 (2nd team), 4 

Basketball 3, 4 (Captain) 

Softball 3 (2nd team) 

Field Hockey 3 (2nd team), 4 

Cheerleading 3, 4 (Captain) 

Water Ballet 3, 4 (Chairman) 

Spanish Club 4 

R.H. Award 3, 4 

Music Appreciation 4 (Honorable Mention) 



SUSAN DICK BRIGGS 

Carefree Apts., Box #4811 
Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahamas 

Katherine Gibbs 



Let's make a run tonight . . . Mac called 
. . . was that 1 or 9 . . . will the cheer- 
leaders please "meat." . . . Sheri help me! 
. . . the hamsters died . . . catch ya later, 
much later . . . Silly Wabbit . . . I'm not 
going to sleep, I'm going to rest for 8 hours 
. . . Don't answer the door ... I "DID- 
ENT" . . . bet you any amount of money 
. . . inheritor of Buddha's stomach . . . 
TEA ROOM . . . kneel and pray . . . 
banana boat . . . B.C. . . . Eroll . . . 




MARTHA ANN CHIGAS 

7 Andover Road 
Billerica, Massachusetts 

Goucher College 




International traveler . . . the Mediter- 
ranean . . . Jeff . . . student driver in a 
hurrv ... 100 words per minute . . . Look, 
no cavities . . . Show me the way to go 
home . . . the meringue maid ... Si, 
Senorita . . . Well, actually . . . Sha- 
lome . . . 




"Life is like music; it must be composed by ear, 
feeling, and instinct, not by rule." 



CAE Club 
Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 
French Club 2, 3, 4 
Spanish Club 3, 4 (President) 
Instauration 1, 2, 3 
Splinters Literary Board 4 
Debate Club 4 

Senior Luncheon Committee 1, 2 
Red Cross Swimming Award 1, 2 
Current Events 2 (Honorable Mention), 
3 (Honorable Mention) 
Junior Bookroom 3 (Chairman) 
Christmas Chorus 3, 4 
Music Appreciation Prize 4 




DONNA ANN CORROON 

Piping Rock Road 

Locust Valley 

Long Island, New York 

Garland Junior College 

Vice-President of the 
Senior Classs 



"A little word in kindness spoken, a motion or a 
tear" 



Becoming domestic! . . . Ah, come on 
now . . . new clothes . . . Pappagallo shoes 
forever . . . phone calls home . . . "Shala- 
mar" every day . . . Could it be Franklin 
Marshall College . . . Please, Donna, open 
the store . . . Robert Goulet . . . "I'm not 
going to that dance!" . . . that laugh . . . 
funny girl. 



CAE Club 

Council 4 

Proctor 3 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Hockey 3, 4 

Badminton 3 

Andover Dance Committee 3 

Fathers' Day Committee 3 

Christmas Chorus 3 

Art contributor to Splinters 3, 4 




CATHERINE GRAHAM COWLES 

332 Iroquois Avenue 
Green Bay, Wisconsin 

Northwestern University 




Rich 



ie 



nage 



. more independence after mar- 
that's just not the way it is . . . 
got to stop eating . . . hey, come on, you 
guys . . . really; 5 . . . Bowdoin weekends 
. . . Green Bay Packers. 



"True worth is in being, not seeming" 




KAVA Club 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

French Club 2, 3, 4 

Debate Club 4 

Basketball 4 (2nd team) 

InstaurationA, 2, 3 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Swimming Team 2, 3, 4 

Water Ballet 4 

Dramatics Club 2, 3 

Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Ski Club 2, 3 

Honor Roll 1, 2, 3, 4 

Senior Luncheon Committee 1, 3 (Chairman) 

Music Appreciation 1 (Honorable Mention) 

Current Events 3, 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Underhill Honor 4 







MARIAN ELIZABETH CROCKER 

184 School Street 
Milton, Massachusetts 

Boston Bouve 

President of KAVA 



"Variety's the very spice of life that gives it all its 
flavour." 



KAVA Club 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

French Club 4 

Ski Club 3, 4 (President) 

Proctor 3 

Instauration 2, 3 

Splinters Business Board 

Hockey 2, 3, 4 

Volleyball 3, 4 

Basketball 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 

Softball 2, 3 (Captain), 4 (Captain) 

Water Ballet Committee 3, 4 

R.H. Award 3, 4 

Christmas Chorus 4 



Term paper due tomorrow! . . . Mandi 
Pandi . . . Harvard Crew . . . Rhod-Island 
Kuala Bear . . . always seeing Briggs at 
Duxbury? . . . "77" at 4 . . . pop corn 
Mandy Rocker . . . Celtics lost, Oh NO! 
I don't like my picture taken, Danelle! 
. . . crooked face . . . "it's crazying out- 
side" . . . candy wreaths . . . 




GAYLE ALLISON DeBELL 

1 1 Oriole Drive 
Andover, Mass. 

Florida Southern College 




This is the worst art history test . . . North 
Carolina, a s-u-t-h-e-r-n state? . . . kanga- 
roos ... I will not take them down . . . 
good ole' Mrs. P. . . . they are so dis- 
organized . . . not Spanish table, tonight? 



"Let all things he done decently and in order." 




CAE Club 

Spanish Club 4 

Debate Club 4 

Senior Luncheon Committee 3 

Splinters 3, 4 (Art Editor) 

CAE Hockey Manager 4 

Commencement Play 4 

Proctor 4 

Art Prize 4 

Art Survey Award 4 

Neatness Award 4 

Special Award - Artistic Room 4 




LYDIA HARTSHORNE DESHLER 

7 Dunham Road 
Scarsdale, New York 

Lake Forest College 






"Certainty generally is illusion and repose is not 
the destiny of man." 



KAVA Club 

French Club 3, 4 

Ski Club 4 

Debate Club 4 

Splinters 4 

Cheerleading 4 

Proctor 3, 4 

Honor Roll 2, 4 

Senior Luncheon Committee 3 

Sec. for Foster Parents Plan 4 

Jr. Bookroom Committee 3 

Head of Decorations Committee for Senior Fair 4 

R.H. Award 3, 4 

Hockey 2 (2nd team), 3 (2nd team), 4 

Volleyball 3 (2nd team), 4 (Captain) 

Basketball 3, 4 

Softball 3 (2nd team) 

Swimming 3, 4 

Water Ballet 3, 4 

Jr. Lifesaving 2 

Music Appreciation 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Current Events 4 (Honorable Mention) 



Desh! . . . foster parent . . . don't forget 
to wake us up at 5:00 . . . fish . . . hay 
fever attacks ... if you cut it, it takes the 
curls out . . . E=MC 2 . . . Spanish— are 
you kidding me . . . I'm not being rude . . . 
Mandy, the tiger fell down again . . . who 
said we couldn't wallpaper a bulletin 
board . . . sewing hats to match self-made 
dresses . . . the original snow bunny. 




BARRIE THORPE FEATHER 

443 Highbrood Avenue 
Pelham Manor, New York 

Briarcliff College 




"Meet mv friend Marv ... up higher . . . 
what do you mean you can't SEE her? 
... tea pot competition. "I'm FREEZING! 
Harvard weekends coming up? . . . Cold 
hands— warm heart. "No thanks, I'll just 
sit here on the radiator." Basketball games 
with Ernie . . . Pine Orchard. 




"A cheerful face is not always smiling hut at least 
serene." 



KAVA Club 

Proctor 4 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 3, 4 

Spanish Club 3, 4 

Instauration 3 

Hockey 4 

Basketball 4 

Swimming 4 

Volleyball 4 

Softball 3 (2nd team) 

Cheerleading 3, 4 

Badminton and Tennis Manager 4 

R.H. Award 4 




MARTHA HARLOW FISHER 

50 Drake Road 
Scarsdale, New York 

Centenary College for Women 

Vice-President of CAE Club 



"Like the bee, we shotdd make our industry our 
amusement." 



Challis, hand ME the mop . . . Call me 
responsible . . . notes and more notes . . . 
SKAWZDALE . . . What did I get for 
my b-dav? . . . whistle as I sew . . . smile 
as I knit . . . One-a-day Letters, Inc. . . . 
When the red, red ROBin comes . . . sun 
porch mania . . . Key, what key? . . . 
Galley-Ho and away we go . . . 



CAE Club 

Class Vice-President 2 

Hockey 2, 3, 4 

Volleyball 2, 3, 4 

Basketball 2, 3, 4 

Swimming Team 2, 3, 4 

Water Ballet 3, 4 

Cheerleading 3 

CAE Spirit Ring 4 

Student Council 3, 4 

Student Marshall 3 

Fathers' Day Committee 2, 3 

Splinters Photography Manager 4 

R.II. Award 2, 3 

Red Cross Swimming Award 2 



_ 



r « 





EDITH PROCTOR FLETCHER 

67 High Street 
Chelmsford, Massachusetts 



Hood College 




The beat of the "2:30 shuffle." Has a 
rhino; about smoke . . . U.N.H. . . . Nor- 
wich . . . silent— but deadly. Gym suits are 
expensive— might as well make use of 
them senior year. Drakes or bust . . . 

but first let's start the car! . . . Spread your 
goodness, baby! 




"In character, in manners, in style, in all things, 
the supreme excellence is simplicity." 



CAE Club 

French Club 3, 4 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Volleyball 4 (2nd team) 

Sr. Lifesaving 4 

Music Appreciation (Honorable Mention) 4 




DEBORAH JUNE GALE 

8 Copeland Avenue 
Reading, Massachusetts 

Mount Ida Junior College 






"Cats and monkeys, monkeys and cats . . . all 
human life is here . . . mocking the air with colors 
idly spread." 



KAVA Club 

Field Hockey 3 (2nd team), 4 (Captain) 

Softball 3 (Captain of 2nd team) 

Water Ballet 3 

Dramatics Club 4 

Senior Luncheon Committee 3 

Literary Committee 3 

Instauration 3 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Council Day Representative 4 

Cups and Banners 4 

Dramatics 3, 4 



Rockport . . . cycle Inn Jump . . . clouds 
. . . yellow bird to Washington . . . Charlie 
Brown ... I love fountains ... no school 
on Fridays ... I fell right in front of the 
instructor . . . domesticity? ... I hate rub- 
ber bands . . . green stockings, yellow 
shoes . . . pipe . . . Richard's love story . . . 
history quizzes . . . T. T. . . . mustang . . . 
teeny bop music . . . would you believe 
that I just drove to school with the 
emergency on . . . 




LOUISE FISHER GODDEN 

45 Sunset Rock Road 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Green Mountain Junior College 




Chronic sprain and a well-worn gym suit 
. . . would you like a ride to P.A.? . . . 
From Green Mountains blazing a 
STRAIGFIT trail to New York . . . Gulp, 
gulp! . . . Give me the 'ol afternoon Free 
. . . absent? 




" >" 



"He who is firm, in will moulds the world to him- 
self." 



CAE Club 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Music Appreciation 1 (Honorable Mention) 

Spanish Club 3, 4 




DANELLE DOROTHY HAHN 

1 04 Chester Avenue 
Garden City, New York 

Marjorie Webster Junior College 



"If it weren't for the optimist the pessimist would 
never know how happy he wasn't." 



KAVA Club 
Swimming Team 4 
Water Ballet 4 



Isabell! ... Is the store open ... I don't 
really care . . . she doesn't like me ... ski 
anyone . . . groovv . . . think I'll get up 
. . . I've learned a lot about texture . . . 
Saturday's dozen . . . M&Ms . . . sub- 
marine with a screen door . . . Who has a 
New York accent? . . . 




js EtiK "S ■• 



SANDRA ANN HALL 

345 iNahant Road 
Nahant, Massachusetts 

Mt. Auburn Hospital School of Nursing 

President of the Senior Class 




Tea but not Orange Pekoe . . . sea and 
sand . . . babysitter supreme . . . stage 
manager blues . . . VIP's aoain and again 
. . . nurse for Gayle . . . gasoline hair- 
straightener . . . mobiles . . . the reader . . . 



"For life goes not backward nor tarries with yester- 
day." 




KAVA Club 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Dramatics 3, 4 

Hockey 3 

Volleyball Manager 4 

Splinters Business Board 4 

Current Events 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Neatness Award 4 

Special Award - artistic room 4 




"Each man can interpret only by his own experi- 
ence." 



CAE Club 

Volleyball 3 (2nd team), 4 

Basketball 3, 4 (2nd team) 

Swim team 3, 4 

Field Hockey 4 (2nd team) 

Ski Club 4 

Cheerleading 3, 4 (Captain) 

Senior Luncheon Committee 3 

Splinters 4 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Neatness Award 4 



JANET MARGRETA KENDALL 

61 Laurelwood Road 
Holden, Massachusetts 

Endicott Junior College 



Would you please explain that a little 
more . . . DAN the MAN . . . and psycho- 
logically . . . What's your problem? . . . 
rubber sandals . . . Cinderella must be 
tragic . . . Cud som haver . . . orange, 
orange, and maybe yellow . . . blueberry 
pies with oatmeal cookies . . . Frankly I 
don't agree . . . grasshopper pie . . . four 
inch claws . . . 




LINDA FULLER LOVEJOY 

2201 Lehigh Station Road 
Pittsford, New York 

Mount Vernon Junior College 




Talk much? Right Lovey! . . . "If I don't 
get outta here this weekend, I'll go insane 
. . . SWIFTly! . . . Mirror, mirror on the 
wall . . . fraternity pins forever . . . "Admit 
it, girls, I'm skinnier than all of you." 
Finally a cheerleader! . . . Making senior 
friends. 




"Patience is a tree whose root is bitter hut its fruit 
is very sweet." 



KAVA Club 

Dramatics Club 4 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Spanish Club 4 

Cheerleading 4 

Music Appreciation 4 (Honorable Mention) 







VALERIE ANN MORGAN 

10 Berkshire Drive 
Winchester, Massachusetts 

Green Mountain Junior College 



'-' 



"1 cried because I had no shoes until I met a man 
who had no feet." 



CAE Club 

Glee Club 4 

Spanish Club 4 

Hockey 4 

Volleyball 4 (Manager) 

Dramatics 4 

CAE-KAVA Fair Committee 4 

Governor Dummer Dance Committee 4 



Blind dates! . . . yellow for St. Paul's"? . . . 
cooking with Prvor late at night! . . . 
"chief" ... Oh, 'right! . . . Valley Forge 
. . . That's close! . . . Come on . . . The 
African Hunter strikes again . . . restaur- 
ant at home . . . You went to Florida? . . . 
"grease" . . . collages!!! . . . "Let's live for 
Today" . . . that 1935 gym suit . . . 





LINDA LEE PRYOR 

10 Beacon Street 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Green Mountain Junior College 









"■\ 






L.P. . . . hot air passing thru the window 
... I am going to marry a European . . . 
Ogunquit!?! . . . Onward, Christian 
soldiers . . . Tom . . . Joe . . . Erie . . . 
goose the loose moose. 



"It is always right that a man should be able to 
render a reason for the faith that is with him. 




KAVA Club 

French Club 3, 4 (President) 

Glee Club 4 

Octet 4 

Ski Club 3 

Splinters Art Board 4 




CAROL ADAMS ROWLEY 

10 Meriam Street 
Lexington, Massachusetts 

Green Mountain Junior College 




"Speech is great, but a wise silence is greater." 



Red pistachio nuts . . . just love history 
. . . come here, honey . . . sailing . . . 
Chris . . . Lenox . . . hey . . . 



KAVA Club 

Field Hockev 2 (2nd team), 4 (2nd team) 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

French Club 3, 4 

Ski Club 3, 4 

Volleyball 3 (2nd team), 4 (2nd team) 

Basketball 3 (2nd team), 4 (2nd team) 

Softball 3 (2nd team) 

Water Ballet 4 

Commencement Plav 4 

Senior Lifesavina 4 

R.H. Award 4 





SANDRA SOUTHWELL SHIPTON 

953 West Street 
Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

University of Denver 




The grass is always greener in New Ha- 
ven . . . actually, I could care less . . . 



North to Jay's Bakery . . . 
Denver . . . Yeah, right . 
Oreonta . . . with Lovejoy 
. . . Thay Thweetie. 



Skiing . . . 

. driving to 

. . Contact 




"The human race is in the best condition when it 
has the greatest degree of liberty." 



KAVA Club 

Softball 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 

Baketball 2, 3 (2nd team), 4 

Volleyball 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 

Field Hockey 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 

Swimming 2 

Water Ballet 2, 3, 4 

French Club 4 

Ski Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Lifesaving 4 

R.H. Award 2, 3, 4 

Octet 4 

Splinters Business Board 4 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Senior Lifesaving 4 

Current Events Award 4 

Parsons Honor 4 




KATHLEEN SULLIVAN 

Box #405 
Rancho Santa Fe, California 

Palomar Junior College 



"A good laugh is sunshine in a house." 



My new horse . 
troopers 101st! . 
senorita again . 
for me!" . . . 



a real beauty . . . Para- 
. guess what? . . . the 
, "Hey, you guys, wait 



KAVA Club 
French Club 3, 4 
Spanish Club 4 
Swimming Team 3, 4 
Hockey Manager 4 
Ski Club 3, 4 
Water Ballet 3, 4 
Commencement Play 4 
Dramatics 4 




GRETCHEN STEARNS VALADE 

37 Willow Lane 
Grosse Point Farms, Michigan 

Albion College 

President of the Student Council 



Are you going to New York? . . . uh! . . . 
ya know . . . And he said he was going to 
call you sometime in May? . . . Want 
some pop? . . . Umm, I don't know . . . 
Brandeis burned? . . . dances with G.DA. 
. . . hot tea burns . . . the piano's out of 
tune . . . hand in demerits . . . MY 
WASTE BASKET WAS ON FIRE?? 
. . . what do you think? ... 1st cigarette 
in a bowling alley . . • I.D. went down 
the drain . . . 





"Good sense is the hody of -poetic genius, fancy its 
drapery, motion its life and imagination the soul." 



KAVA Club 

Glee Club 2, 3 (Vice-President), 4 

Basketball 4 (2nd team Capt.) 

Softball 3 

Hockey 4 (2nd team) 

Dramatics 3, 4 

Octet 3, 4 (Head) 

Spanish Club 3, 4 

Council 3, 4 (President) 

KAVA Spirit Ring 4 

Water Ballet Chairman 3 

Class President 3 

RH Negatives (Leader) 

Music Appreciation 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Helen Hill Award 4 




CHALLIS NELSON WALKER 

1508 South Shore Drive 
Erie, Pennsylvania 

Centenary College for Women 



"Beauty is a pleasure regarded as the quality of a 
thing." 



KAVA Club 

Class Vice President 2 

Splinters Business Board Manager 4 

Proctor 3, 4 

Dramatics 1 

Dramatics Club 4 

Spanish Club 4 

Softball Manager 3 

Graduation Marshall 3 



Philadelphia . . . paper fleurs . . . Roses 
. . . Hope this sweater fits . . . Let me see 
. . . Rose Tea and a lemon . . . Get out of 
here before we get demerits! . . . problems 
in P.O.D. . . . Boston?? . . . Tennis, any- 
one? 




CATHERINE ELY WELCH 

9 Lake Place 
Branford, Connecticut 

Marjorie Webster Junior College 

Vice President of KAVA 




EEL . . . New Haven . . . did you say he 
was still in grammar school . . . don't 
worry ... I promise you . . . can I borrow 
. . . Don't mess with Bill . . . Does anyone 
have a mug? ... do my hips show . . . 
Judy Collins . . . I'm really going to diet 
now . . . planters warts . . . the beach . . . 
... "I wanna be free." . . . whats' a dri- 
ver's license? . . . Pond's cures alligator 
skin . . . have my bangs grown . . . 




l/-** 1 jW 




. :8 :JV:::; 




"The blue's but a mist from the breath of the 
wind, a tarnish that goes at the touch of a hand." 



KAVA Club 

Hockey 1 (2nd team), 2, 3, 4 

Softball 1 (2nd team), 2, 3 (Captain) 

Swimming 1, 2, 4 

Basketball 4 (2nd team) 

Water Ballet 2, 4 

Octet 4 

Cheerleading 2, 3, 4 

Class Vice-President 1 

Senior Lifesaving 2 

R.H. Award 4 




AMY-JO WHITEHEAD 

3259 Polo Drive 
Delray Beach, Florida 

Gulf Park Junior College 

President of CAE 



"The difference between men is energy invincible, 
determination— a purpose once fixed." 



CAE Club 

Hockey 1 (2nd team), 2, 3, 4 

Volleyball 1 (2nd team), 2, 3, 4 

Basketball 1 (2nd team), 2, 3, 4 

Softball 1, 2, 3, 4 

Water Ballet 2, 3, 4 

Swim Team 2, 3, 4 

Cheerleading 2, 3, 4 

Spanish Club 4 

Tennis Team 2 

Music Appreciation 2, 3 

Splinters Business Board 4 

R.H. Award 2, 3, 4 

Neatness Award 4 



I'm trying to sleep . . . under gamma rays 
. . . Ah, yes, true love ... a fib a day . . . 
kept the doctor away? . . . frappe cups 
and straws foaming in the Commons . . . 
boom, boom . . . How! do you make an 
Indian rug . . . million dollar mouth . . . 
I had a hamster for a roommate . . . 




SHERILL HOLDEN WICKWIRE 

RFD#2 
Locust Avenue 

Homer, New York 

Bradford Junior College 



A hand through a window is worth . . . 
disjointed year . . . bangs-bangs . . . coffee 
time? . . . Midnight phone calls ... a 
rendezvous! 3 . . . Briggs, the man's outside 
. . . It's just that she's clumsy . . . "Have 
vou seen my . . ." Pisano . . . Knapsack 
. . . Expositorv writing . . . burnt hair . . . 
Buddha Bowdoin . . . jug band . . . 
posters . . . surrealism . . . 





"7 will not follow where the path may lead, hut 1 
will go where there is no path, and I will leave a 
trail." 



CAE Club 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Dramatics 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 4 

Instauration 3 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Honor Roll 2 

Founder's Day Committee 4 

Fathers' Day Entertainment 4 

Commencement Play 4 

Water Ballet (Script) 4 

Music Appreciation 2 (Honorable Mention) 

Ski Club 4 

Prom Committee 4 (Co-head) 

Stage Manager 3, 4 

Softball 2 

Swimming Team 2 

Volleyball 4 (2nd team) 

Basketball 4 

Katharine Whitten MacGay Literary Prize 4 




DEBORAH ANNE WILSON 

1270 Andover Street 
North Tewksbury, Massachusetts 

Vernon Court Junior College 



"A laugh is xvorth one hundred groans in any 
market." 



CAE Club 

Basketball 2 (2nd team), 4 

Hockey 2 (2nd team), 3 (2nd team), 4 (2nd team) 

Softball 1 (2nd team), 2, 3 (2nd team), 4 

Swimming Team Manager 4 

Volleyball 2 (2nd team), 3 (2nd team), 4 

Water Ballet 4 

R.H. Award 4 



"I wonder if I got a letter?" . . . "I'm 
starved!" . . . LL society . . . basically shy 
. . . MacDonald's . . . ILL . . . just nerves 
. . . write me a note . . . Governor Dum- 
mer? . . . Champagne . . . cute, real cute 
. . . epilepsy . . . Ike . . . The Gray Mole- 
cule . . . Plimpton Boarding House . . . 
Can I borrow your . . . I'm in love with 
LOVE ... 




CALENDAR 

September 

21 THE BEGINNING OF THE SCHOOL YEAR 

Footsteps leading on unknown paths of spiders ' webs— adjusting the mind 
to the plans intertwined in the unexpected. 

24 SINGING BEACH 

A faint whisper of a tangerine summer still lingering in the din of strange 
voices. 

25 VESPERS 

People stretch the irregularities of their fingertips into the stage portray- 
ing life. 
October 

1 NEW HAMPTON DANCE 

Summer calloused feet are again narrowed by Pappagallos. 

4 INITIATION 

Bathed in marshmallow, rice, coffee grinds, oatmeal, lotion and soapflakes 
and robed in a Roman Consulate bedspread 

7 CAE AND KAVA DINNER 

Competing colors mellowed . . . pink and green. 

8 SENIOR SISTER CEREMONY 

Lookng through crystal glasses at the friendship between the candle and 
the upside down flower. 
12 SENIOR PICTURES 

"stung by the splendor of a sudden thought." 

15 ANDOVER DANCE 

Leaving no room for disbelief in social origin. 

16 VESPERS 

A trip through a projector into Brazilia. 

21 ANDOVER CELEBRITY SERIES 

22 ST. PAUL'S DANCE 

I sway from hence you tap in gentle rhvthm . . ."?}} 

26 FREEDOM TRAIL 

Tracing freedom's cause upon the worn threads tying the museum to 
reality. 
29 EXETER DANCE 

Walking upon invisible bridges into fields of rushes and milkweeds. 
November 

5 PARENTS' WEEKEND 

Parents' organization formed to make the parents influential "alumni." 
FIRST TEAM HOCKEY - CAE 
8 SECOND TEAM HOCKEY CAE 
18 PARIS RIVE GAUCHE 

French folk songs were not inhibited by translation. 

22 THANKSGIVING PLAYS 

The Still Alarm drove us to Mr. Flannery's Ocean. 

23 THANKSGIVING VACATION 

Liberated hunter seeks turkey hiding in Northeastern smog. 
December 

3 SAT'S 

ANDOVER DANCE 

Frustrated script released in dissonant tone by the Glee Club. 



11 CHRISTMAS VESPERS 

SENIOR RING CEREMONY 

"Sunday is the golden clasp that binds together the volumn of the year." 
13 CHRISTMAS PLAY 

Christmas in the Market Place. 
15 CHRISTMAS VACATION 

Leaving to plant seeds of remembrance in the hearts of the receiver. 
January 

3 RETURN FROM VACATION 

"Everything in the world can be endured except continued prosperity". . .} 
11 SECOND TEAM VOLLEYBALL - KAVA 

13 FIRST TEAM VOLLEYBALL - CAE 

14 ANDOVER DANCE 

Blotches of hallucinatory color replace simplified reality. 
16-20 REVIEW WEEK 

Basic concentrated effort to retain; more familiarly known as "cramming." 
21 CAE DINNER 

Relieve the tension of "monotonous" studying. 
23-27 MID-YEAR EXAMS 

With ignorance spinning within our bodies, nature's winds carried vis 
safely through a whirlpool of facts. 
26-29 LONG WEEKEND 
SENIOR SKI TRIP 

Had to resort to skiing on marshmallows and boiling snow. 
February 

5 CHEERLEADING DINNER 

Clubs show their appreciation for the undying spirit. 
10-12 SKI WEEKEND 

Undying warmth glows in the semi-frostbitten faces of children. 
11 GOVERNOR DUMMER DANCE 
"words, words, words ..." 

17 LAWRENCE ACADEMY DANCE 
Glee Club. 

18 ANDOVER DANCE 

German club was momentarily formed to sponsor a dance. 
March 

3 SKI TRIP 

Short sleeves, cotton knicker socks, suntan lotion and Ben Gay. 
7 FREE DAY 

"The camel at the close of day kneels down upon a sandy plain to have 
his burden momentarily lifted to sleep again." 
11 TILTON DANCE 
Glee Club 

15 MISS LEBUTT'S PIANO RECITAL 

16 SPRING PLAYS - A Workshop of One-Act Plays 

The Farewell Su-pper led to Goodnight Caroline whose interest in The 
Case of the Crushed Petunias began on A Sunny Morning. 

17 SPRING VACATION 

Trees are no longer barren because mood has changed the season; winter 
is a shifted image of a half-remembered face. 



April 



11 
12 

13 
14 

22 



May 



6 

7 



17 
20 



25 
22-26 
29-June 



June 



1 
2 



RETURN FROM VACATION 

You lean against a shadow on the door and say that this has all happened 

before. 

SECOND TEAM BASKETBALL - CAE 

TRIPS TO PLYMOUTH, CONCORD AND STURBRIDGE 

A look at colonial America from the mast of the Mayflower . . . 

FIRST TEAM BASKETBALL - KAVA 

ANDOVER DANCE 

Instead of toning down the music, the chaperones left the room. 

FATHERS' WEEKEND 

A look at the younger generation; rained-out baseball game; water ballet 

gave us slipped discs; and entertainment including a ballet, jug band, 

"Hello, Dolly," folk songs, and oh! you wonderful dad . . . 

SAT'S 
FOUNDER'S DAY 

Senior Fair, Alumnae meeting, Glee Club, freshmen repeated "Hello, 

Dolly" and the Water Ballet ended the day with two scenes. 

SWIMMING MEET - KAVA 

SENIOR PROM 

Here at the quiet limit of the world wearing a white flower; dust would 

hear and beat to the music of an electric band. 

FRENCH CLUB AND SPANISH CLUB TEA 

A salute to a Spanish maiden and the poetry of the French. 

REVIEW WEEK 

Conscious studying . . . with half a mind on summer vacation. 

FINAL EXAMS 

A thought emerges from the conscious mind entering a territory of fresh 

awareness . . .? 

CAE AND KAVA DINNERS 

SENIOR SISTER - UNDERGRAD CEREMONY 

A hobo living for natural freedom leaves a grain of salt upon those people 

who have needed his warmth. 

SINGING BEACH 

Shout of what is no longer a tangerine mirage carries to distant chambers 

of familiar voices. 

BACCALAUREATE SERMON 

Outlining the signs of maturity. 

MUSICALE 

Glee Club 

Piano Concerto - Miss LeButt and Martha Chigas. 

SENIOR LUNCHEON 

CLASS DAY EXERCISES 

COMMENCEMENT PLAY 

The Mouse That Roared. 

RECEPTION FOR SENIOR CLASS 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 

Now distinguishing only the silhouettes of yesterday; before our eyes the 

mirage of tomorrow . . . 




Pru Allen 




Sue Briggs 




Mandy Crocker 




Iks 81 




Marti Baker 




Martha Chigas 






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Gayle DeBell 





Hillary Barton 






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Cathy Cowles 




Lydia 


Deshler 




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Doris BeU 




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Donna Corroon 




Barrie Feather 

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Mm/j 1 Fisher 



Edie Fletcher 



Debbie Gale 



Louise Godden 



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Danelle Hahn 




Valerie Morgan 




Kathy Sullivan 




Sandy Hall (in disguise) 

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Gretchen Valade 











Ki Kendall 





Carol Roivle 




Challis Walker 







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Linda Lovejoy 




Sandy Shipton 



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Cat^y Welch 




Amy Whitehead 



Sheri Wickwire 



Dehhie Wilson 



PROPHECY 

The year is 1987— an eventful year. The United States and Russia have reached 
a detente and are cooperating in the field of space exploration. Already the Lunar 
Colonies and their leader Timothy Leary, Jr. are beginning to show resistance to their 
taxation and a desire to become independent of the Earth. John-John, the young 
senator from Massachusetts, is the. next heir to the presidential throne, succeeding 
his uncle Edward. The world is surging forward, but Rogers Hall has remained 
remarkably the same as it was in 1967. However, its alumnae have accomplished 
various and sundry tasks in world living. 

Just the other dav, I heard that Sheri Wickwire had become stuck on one of 
her pot-art murals in 1980 and has been hanging in the New York Museum of Natural 
History ever since. She has consequently developed a seven-vear itch from lack of 
fingertip movement. Her closest confidante, Sue Briggs, has just returned from her 
recent European TRIP . . . and is now paddling from the Florida KEYS to Nassau 
in her slow Banana Boat carrying a A4AC truck in the rear of the vessel. 

As I report to you from Rio de Janeiro, the night before Amy Whitehead's fifth 
engagement party, I can't help noticing the activities of the class of '67. Challis 
Walker, who is doing the decorations for Amy's party, has created a temple out of 
tiny tea leaves and has covered the walls with Roses. The floor is covered with Jim- 
mats upon which Amy is doing her nightly exercises in order to fit into her original 
white dress. She is studying the famous "Sullivan Slimming Steps." Kathy, herself, 
now weighs only 97 pounds! Gretchen Valade has been elected Chairman of the 
Chairman's Pick-up Committee, as she sweeps DIRT from room to room, singing, 
"Uu-e -Uu -Ah -Ah . . ." Hillary Barton is selling peanut butter and jelly sandwiches 
to the decoration committee as Doris Bell butters-up her bread. 

Cathy Cowles writes her regrets and thank-vou's. She is unable to attend the 
party due to a recent commitment— which she dare not break— at the Come-and-Get- 
It Gourmet Rest Home. She thanks Miss Whitehead for h.er sympathetic contribution 
of two pounds of black licorice, one R.H. pie, one tin of Trifle, three gallons of 
coffee ice cream, and "just a little tinv bite" of apple crisp— all pressed under glass. 

Louise Godden, I am sorry to say, is also unable to make the party. She recentlv 
was involved in an accident of an undetermined nature; the rescue squad could not 
find her when the SMOKE cleared. 

The hour of the party has arrived, 10:00 P.M., June 6, 1987— a memorable date 
for the class of '67. First to arrive is Prudence Allen. She has been forced to attend 
the party barefoot because the Germans have taken away her shoes. Under one arm, 
Prudence is carrying her one-act play, entitled, Talk to Me, Bourbon; under her 
other, a diaper pail; on her back, a blonde papoose— she is smiling. 

Amy's fiance has just asked Danelle to dance. She responded immediately, "I 
can't; I can't; I can't," and excused herself before the store closed, mumbling some- 
thing about the Wicked Witch. Carol Rowley, espionage agent to Amy's FORMER 
fiance, has come to the party unannounced in order to hide her true identity. 

Suddenly, I hear the familiar sound of pop-pop-pop . . . Mandy Crocker is 
arriving with her portable corn-popper. She is explaining to the GROUP that she 
left her job as playground director at Harvard just to come to the party. She left 
Lydia Deshler in charge as Foster Parent, all paid-up till August. 

Ki Kendall just flew in from New York. She is dressed in ORANGE set off 
against her RED face, complementing her WHITE legs, accentuating PINK 
"knuckle nails," wearing her perpetual, profound rubber sandals, professing still that 
she is the only intelligent blonde at the party. 



PROPHECY 

Muffle Fisher has dual duties at Amy's party. When she is not serving Roh 
Collinses— her Deah specialty— she serves as special photographer to SPLINTER her 
friends. 

Barrie Feather has come from the Land of Oz still towing her invisible friend, 
Mary, AND her hot water bottle. Barrie's invisible friend, Mary, has a friend Ernie, 
a seven-foot rabbit, who has brought a friend of a friend for a BLIND date for Valerie 
Morgan. Poor Valerie! 

I have just learned that Kathy Welch will not be able to come. She has just 
produced her third set of twins, which seems to be a family affliction. 

Gayle DeBell has just come hurrying in, a smile on her face, stepping lightly. 
She seems to be limping; I am told that last Wednesday she tripped over her FALL 
in the museum, of which she is a curator. Apparently Sandy Hall was the nurse on 
duty who splinted her split ends. 

Martha Chigas was also planning to announce her engagement at Amy's party 
when her father did it for her. It appears that Martha has been betrothed to a Greek 
shipping magnate since birth, unknown, of course, to her. 

Donna Corroon arrived a few minutes ago, dressed as beautifully as always, and 
she "just happens to have with her" the family album, including a recent addition 
in the traditional bathtub pose. 

All heads turn as Linda Pryor runs through. She has just left the hairdresser 
delighted with her new Twiggy cut, and as always, is on her way to the "dentist." 
ANYWAYS, in a week Pryor will leave for her annual visit to Florence in search of 
Caney. 

Ladies and gentlemen, attention! The silver Bomb has just pulled in, and Miss 
Wilson enters the arena followed by her entourage of Andover, Exeter, Governor 
Dummer, and Groton graduates— all of whom have grown slightly paunchy . . . 
Beside her, walks Doris, ABROAD social secretary, taking all foreign calls. Doris left 
Hillary last night for a higher-paying job, with more fringe benefits. Hillary left the 
peanut butter and jellv business for another vacation in Florida. 

And in this corner, we have Martha Baker to provide the afternoon's entertain- 
ment. Marti is still trying to play the mandolin accompanied by her GLEEFUL voice 
and lilting laughter. 

L. Free Lovejoy, who spent hours in preparation for the party, is robed in a 
cherry-colored dress, making like James Brown. She flew in last night from Chicago 
to tell us all about her life as Miss September, and hopes to be a cover girl next year. 
Right now, Lovey is still making friends with the class of '67. 

The crowd hushes as the celebrated Miss Fletcher arrives. Edie is on her wav to 
Washington to patent her ALL-Purpose Smoker's Delight. This remarkable gadget 
rolls, lights, smokes, and extinguishes cigarettes. It serves dually as an ash trav and 
a whisk broom, and holds soft or crush-pack packages. We, of course, wish her luck. 

Sandy Shipton and Debbie Gale have just DROPPED IN a little late 
after a mere collision in mid-air, Debbie in her parachute, Sandy on her broomstick. I 
hope that they will be feeling in higher SPIRITS when we all meet again at Amy's 
next engagement party. 



Catherine Cowles and the Group 



CLASS WILL 

WE LEAVE: 

MISS ALEXANDER chalk that won't wear off as the day wears on. 

MISS BOWES "consequently" "at a stand point." 

MRS. CALHOUN an organized office. 

MRS. COLPITTS a splintery tongue depresser and a passport to peace. 

MR. CONGER pacing out mystical hydro-carbons on the floor. 

MRS. CROSBY breakfast in bed. 

MISS DION an unbreakable diamond needle so she won't spoil her long 
playing record. 

MRS. DOWNES a dozen frog brains. 

MRS. HOFFER with Christopher Robin and friends. 

MRS. A. JONES a "lye" detector. 

MRS. F. JONES a pointless umbrella and a year's supply of valentines. 

MISS LANDIS foot-warmers for the future. 

MRS. LATOUR with the '68 schedule of board meetings in N.Y. 

MISS LEBUTT an alarming Tuesday evening study hall. 

MANUEL AND BILL a peace pipe. 

MRS. PERLOFF shifting into new gears. 

MISS PHELPS a new notebook to replace her Ancient one. 

MISS PULLING waiting for the rest of the table. 

MISS RAMSAY a senior class that wakes up before December. 

MISS ROBINSON clammed up in Naples. 

MRS. SARGENT a cage for her second floor zoo. 

MRS. STATEN a periscope for the station wagon. 

MRS. WORSHAM a book of cancelled Bank statements. 



CLASS WILL 

PRUDENCE ALLEN leaves her shoes under the bed. 

MARTHA BAKER leaves the Cambridge mist for London fog. 

HILLARY BARTON leaves hunting "Hughy Ducks" and seeking out other wild life. 

DORIS BELL leaves Flipping for Sin City. 

SUE BRIGGS leaves her unbendable joints on the basketball courts. 

MARTHA CHIGAS leaves her Grecian bikini to the Art department for still life 
study. 

DONNA CORROON leaves her seventeen pair of Pappaggalo shoes to the needie 
Lorrie LaCour. 

CATHY COWLES leaves "RICHLY" enriched. 

MANDY CROCKER leaves to return in four years as the R.H. gym teacher. 

GAYLE DeBELL leaves to desert the Union for a hotter climate. 

LYDIA DESHLER leaves her math problems to Dear Abhie. 

BARRIE FEATHER leaves molting. 

MUFFIE FISHER leaves shuffling off to Buffalo on a "deah" hunt. 

EDIE FLETCHER leaves to join the HOODSIES. 

DEBBIE GALE leaves Roger and Out. 

LOUISE GODDEN leaves her smoking car to Flip Holihan. 

DANELLE HAHN leaves her sense of texture in the art room. 

SANDY HALL leaves the senior meeting first, disguised as the mad scientist. 

KI KENDALL leaves her orange passion to her dear friends Chris and Charlie 
Brown. 

LINDA LOVEJOY leaves seeking the absolute. 

VALERIE MORGAN leaves as sharp as ever. 

LINDA PRYOR leaves her real live Alice in Wonderland doll to the French Club 
"in memory of" . . . 

CAROL ROWLEY leaves to "Chris-ten" bigger and better things. 

SANDY SHIPTON leaves her broom stick stuck in a sitz mark. 

KATHY SULLIVAN leaves for the ranch vowing never to return to Dudesville. 

GRETCHEN VALADE leaves "you-know", "urn", "you-know" to Kathy Beers. 

CHALLIS WALKER leaves her phone bills to the Better Business Bureau. 

KATHY WELCH leaves old beaus to her fine-Feathered friends. 

AMY "BOOM-BOOM" WHITEHEAD leaves T&T for the next big bang. 

SHERI WICKWIRE leaves for the second time. 

DEBBIE WILSON leaves her "wisdom teeth" to Pam Bell and her accent to Cindv 
Brox. 

Debbie Gale and the Staff 




The heads of State— in re-pose 



Sugar gives me energy 



I've got a SECRET 




You cannot demonstrate an emotion 
to prove an aspiration 



They say my mouth is 
worth a million 



I wish I could pick it up 
and wring, it out 




You pretend you're Frank 



And I'll pretend you're Richie 



The cat in the hat 




She forgot to get the lemons! 



All right everyone, SING! 



The Cherry Phantom 




I'm a hockey stah/ 



What a thing is a man 



C'mon, let's sing Danny Boy— 




"Gud som haver barnen kar 



"Come on Hill—llya is waiting" 



To take off or not to take off 




The man said to smile . . 



We're always cheerful when 
going to class 



Five finger exercise 




Crunch - Crunch 



Our dad has double trouble 



Perha-ps it's invisible Mary 





After six years at R.H., 
you get this way 



Who's asking? 



Let's hope Banks doesn't 
come home . . . 




Wanna hear a funny? 





I say, shall we call an ambulance? 




Good sets of good friends 



SENIOR SONG 

Tune: "Se-ptember in the Rain" 

We lit your candles in the gym 

Remember, in September, imdergrads 

The time has passed so quickly yet 

We'll cherish every memory through the years. 

Though far apart your friendship will be with us, 

Your helpfulness in each and every way. 

The spring is here; to us it's still September, 

That September, undergrads. 

The parting's sad but graduation's here now. 

We hope that we have helped you in some way. 

So now we leave you but always remember, 

That September, undergrads. 

—Martha Ann Chigas, '67 





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Junior Class Officers 

Vice-President Charlotte Brohard 

President Nancy Smith 



Sophomore Class Officers 

Vice-President Alida Mcllvain 

President Suzanne Johnson 




Freshman Class Officers 

President Mary Thomas 

Vice-President Susan Shipton 





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; my latest fainting, what else? 



Allie - Allie - in - free 



Goo-Goo! 




Get lost 



We're GLEEful 



Well, I never said 1 was perfect . . 




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Quick! The rescue squad— 



Mmmmmmmmmmmmm . 



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Not even if I give you these? 



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Las Ninas 



Domestic duties make me dreamy . . . 




She thinks she's cool 



Loving cups are my style . . . 



A Room With A View 




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UNDERGRADUATE SONG 

Tune: "Softly, as 1 leave you" 

Softly, as you leave us, may we 
Thank you for your senior sister love 

and helping hand. 
Though you leave us softly, 
On your way to learning, 
We will follow you, and in. our hearts 
We all will say, 
"Wish you could stay." 
Even as you leave, 
Other friendships we will weave 
But may yours guide us ever on, 
Guide us ever on, guide us ever on . . . 

—Georgia Innes, '68 












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GOVERNMENT 




Student' Council 
Seated: Beers, Valade (President), Wright 
Standing: Corroon, Miss Ramsav, Gale, Fisher 




Student Proctors 

Kneeling Front: Deshler, Downev, Zinn, Feather, Hall B. 

Seated: Walker, Miss Ramsay, Kendall. 

Standing: Peck, DeBell, Winter, Smith, Baker, Brion, Bacon, Kirchmaier, Pollak, 
Allen, Warner, Paine. 



PUBLICATIONS 




Splinters 

Seated: Shipton, DeBell (Art Editor), Allen (Editor-in-Chief), Walker (Business 
Manager), Kendall. 

Standing: Gale, Baker, Pryor, Wickvvire, Deshler, Crocker, Fisher, Whitehead, 
Chigas, Hall, Cowles. 




The Columns 

Standing: Bell P., Hemingway, Hall B., Pletscher 

Seated Center: Beers, Brohard, Leoff. 

Seated Rear: Smith, Brion, Wright (Editor), DeBlois, Anderson. 



MUSIC 




Glee Club 

First Row: S. Hall, Wickwire, Valade, Gale, Eddy, Zinn, Innes, Fuller (Vice- 
President), Miss LeButt, Baker (President), Downey, Shipton, Bullock, Lovejoy, 
Beers, Allen, DeBlois, A. Wilson. 

Second Row: E. Hall, Sweet, Chigas, Feather, Strasburg, Keast, Brion. 

Third Row: Hemingway, McKallagat, Slimmon, Brohard, Crocker. 

Fourth Row: Godden, Fletcher, Pryor, Harvey, Rowley, Johnson, Morgan, Cowles, 
Pollak, Anderson, Bacon, Hahn. 

Fifth Roxv: Corroon, Kendall, Pletscher, Tatian, Mcllvain, Saunders, Wright, Kirch- 
maier, Winter, Gadd. 




The R. H. Negatives 
Front: Lockwood, Valade (Leader), Innes. 
Second Row: Pryor, Shipton, Welch, Baker, Wright, Fuller (Listener). 




French Club 

First Row: Cowles, Tighe, Innes, Landwehr, Shipton, Chigas. 

Second Row: Rowley, Downey (Vice-President), Mrs. Hoffer, Pryor (President), 
LaCour. 

Third Row: Crocker, Brion, Sullivan, DeBlois, Harvey, Beers, Fletcher, Scannell, 
Deshler, P. Bell, A. Wilson, Leoff, E. Plimpton. 




Spanish Club 

Sitting: Lovejoy, Briggs, Chigas (President), Miss Pulling, Alvarez (Vice-President), 
Parkinson, Walker, Fuller. 

Standing: Morgan, Valade, Feather, Wright, Whitehead, Godden, Winter, DeBell, 
Sullivan, Sutton. 




Debate Club 

Sitting: Gale (Secretary), Allen (President). 

Standing: Deshler, Chigas, Leoff, DeBell, Cowles, Parkinson, Brion, Walker. 



ii^v^H 




Ski Club 

Kneeling: Thomas, Baker, Shepard, Shipton Su., Shipton Sa., Hall B., Rowley, 
Sullivan. 

Standing: Bacon, Wickwirc, Kendall, Mcllvain, Keast, Tatian, LaCour, Gadd, 
Smith, Deshler, Brohard, Lockwood. 

Seated Center: Crocker (President), Wright (Vice-President). 



t *.*"! 



Dramatics 
First Row: Valade, Feather, Walker, Downev, LaCour, Lovejoy. 
Second Row: Scannell, Hall, Eddy, Harp, Parkinson. 
Third Row: Wright, DeBlois, Wilson, Wickwire, Bullock. 
Fourth Row: Doremus, Warner, Gale, Bell. 
Standing Left: Beers (President); Right: Landwehr (Vice-President). 





True disputants are like true sportsman, 
their whole delight is in the pursuit. 

—Alexander Pope 




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CAE Officers 

Muff Fisher, Vice-President 

Amy-Jo Whitehead, President 



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KAVA Officers 

Mandy Crocker, President 
Cathy Welch, Vice-President 



CAE 6 — KAVA I 




CAE Hockey 

Kneeling: Anderson, Morgan, Allen, Bell D., Whitehead, Fisher. 

Standing: Pollak, Peck, Plimpton N., Mcllvain (Captain), Bullock, Sutton, Corroon, 
DeBell (Manager). 




KAVA Hockey 

Front: Welch (Captain). 

First Ro\v: Tighe, Shipton Sa., Alvarez, Thomas, Deshler, Crocker. 

Second Row: Feather, Briggs, LaCour, Baker, Wright, Barton, Sullivan (Manager). 




Hockey Games 

In the first part of the game both teams were evenly matched. CAE broke 
through KAVA's defense to make the first goal. CAE made four more goals during 
the rest of the first half. 

KAVA took the ball right down to make a goal at the beginning of the second 
half. This act strengthened KAVA's defense, and CAE got only one more goal 
the rest of the game. 

The spirit of the crowd of parents and students stayed strong even after the 
score of 6-1 in CAE's favor was announced. CAE's spirit was due to the fact that 
CAE had not received the Hockey Cup in three years. KAVA's spirit showed that 
KAVA wanted to keep her undefeated title. 

After the game the parents, team members, and cheerleaders crowded into the 
dining room for ice cream and for the distribution of the charms. This day marked 
the beginning of a new RH tradition; the hockey banquet will be replaced by the 
Parents' Day Activities. 

2nd Teams 

(CAE 1 - KAVA 0) 



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^E 


KAVA 


Beers 


Nields 


Brion 


Leoff 


DeBlois 


Plimpton, L. 


Gale (Captain) 


Paine 


Gadd 


Scannell 


Hall E. 


Rowley 


Kendall 


Seller 


Hemingway 


Shipton, Susan 


Kinnev 


Smith 


Hunt 


Templet 


Landwehr 


Wilson (Captain) 


Keast 


Valade 


McKallagat 


DeBell (Manager) 


Laundon 


Wright 

Sullivan (Manager) 





CAE 35 — KAVA 24 




CAE Volleyball 

Standing: Wilson D., Lefferts, Kendall, Plimpton N., Bullock, Pollak, Vallis, Allen, 
Morgan (Manager). 

Front: Whitehead, Bell (Captain), Fisher. 




KAVA Volleyball 

Front: Deshler (Captain). 

Second Row: Crocker, Ship ton Sa. 

Third Row: Hall S. (Manager), LaCour, Laundon, Hemingway. 

Fourth Row: Feather, Briggs, Maggy, Tighe, Barton. 



Volleyball Games 

The coin was tossed to determine who was going to serve first in the second 
team game. KAVA was the first server to start a fascinating game. The score was 
28-22 for KAVA. 

The first team game was played after the second team game, unlike the hockey 
game. Doris Bell, CAE's captain, won the toss up between her and Lydia Deshler, 
KAVA's captain. KAVA was the server in the game again. Tina Lefferts was high 
scorer for CAE, Hillery Barton for KAVA. The final score was 35-24 in CAE's 
favor. 

2nd Teams 



CAE 

Anderson 

Bacon 

DeBlois 

Fletcher (Captain) 

Mcllvain 

Plimpton E. 

Saunders 

Spring 

Wickwire 

Wilson A. 

Morgan (Manager) 



KAVA 

Alvarez 

Baker 

Downey 

Fuller 

Leoff 

Rowley 

Tomsu 

Winter 

Wright (Captain) 

Hall S. (Manager) 








Oops-a-daisy 



Wanna make a bet I'm the Champ? 




And then she swallowed the hall . . . 



KAVA 14 — CAE 13 




CAE Basketball 

Left to Right: Saunders, Fisher, Wickwire, Bell D., Allen (Captain), Pletscher 
(Manager), Whitehead, Bullock, Plimpton N., Wilson D. 




KAVA Basketball 
Front: Briggs (Captain), Downey (Manager), LaCour, Feather. 
Rear: Deshler, Barton, Shipton Sa., Crocker, Baker. 



Basketball Games 



After trying both methods of playing basketball this year, CAE and KAVA 
decided to play the game using the traditional two-court method. In the second team 
game Vanessa Vallis and Gretchen Valade were the high scorers for their team, and 
the score was 23-10 in CAE's favor. The first team game was much closer in score 
than was the second team game. KAVA won by a margin of one point with the 
score of 14-13. KAVA's song was selected as the better of the two songs sung by 
the clubs at the banquet that night. 





2nd Teams 




CAE 




KAVA 


Bacon 




Cowles 


Kendall 

Kinney (Captain) 

Lefferts 




Hemingway 

Rowley 

Thomas 


Pollak 




Tomsu 


Spring 
Vallis 




Valade (Captain) 
Welch 


Wilson A. 




Winter 


Pletscher (Manager) 




Downey (Manager) 





So I'm getting ready to cheer 



Maybe if we got down on our knees 




After-game Night Life 



RAINED OUT 




CAE Softball 

First Row: Kinney, Bell D., Whitehead (Captain), Vallis, Spring, Allen. 

Second Row: Plimpton N., Wilson D., Bullock, Kendall, Wickwire, Pollak, Brown, 
Seller, Fisher (Absent). 



Rear: Bacon (Manager). 







KAVA Softball 

First Row: Hunt, Shipton Sa., Hemingway, Strasburg, Crocker (Captain), Wash- 
burn, Rowley. 

Second Row: Maggy, Deshler, Kirchmaier, Briggs, Baker, Welch, LaCour, Wright, 
Cowles (Manager). 



Softball Game 





Let's use these instead 



Dance to the Sungod 



In the true sense of the phrase we had a winter-in-spring term. The basket- 
ball games, as well as the snows and cold winds, came after the vacation. This un- 
natural weather prevented the practices for Softball. May looked hopeful for sun- 
burns and the full use of the fields, but since April had the snows of winter, May 
had the showers. There were about four practices in which the clubs selected their 
members of the teams. There was to be only one large softball team to play in one 
game this year. Unfortunately the rain, not the game, was forecasted that dav and 
the next, the last two days of review week. That news brought an undefeated soft- 
ball season for CAE and KAVA to an abrupt end. 





I'll just keep it on for next year's game 



On a sunny day 1 don't fool around 



CUP WINNER — DORIS BELL (CAE) 




CAE Badminton 
Spring, Bell D., Harvey (Manager), Kinney, Warner 



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Valade, Briggs, Feather (Manager), LaCour, Maggy 



CUP WINNER — SUSAN SHIPTON (KAVA) 




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CAE Tennis 
Wickwire, Vallis, Harvey (Manager), Spring, Fisher. 




KAVA Tennis 

Briggs, Barton, Shipton Sa., Shipton, Su., Feather (Manager) 



KAVA 65 - CAE 52 




CAE Swimming 
Seated: Allen, Whitehead, Mack, Kinney, Bell D. 
Standing: Mcllvain, Warner, Nields, Kendall, Fisher, Wilson D. (Manager) 




KAVA Swimming 
Seated: Kirchmaier, Hahn, Maggy, Wright, Deshler, Beck 
Standing: Feather, Copeland, Sullivan, Cowles, Welch, Barton (Manager). 




CAE Cheerleaders 
Front: Jodi Landwehr (mascot). 

Kneeling: Allen, Kendall (Captain), Bell D., Whitehead. 
Rear: Vallis, Plimpton L., Wilson D., Mcllvain, Fisher, Peck, Pletscher. 




KAVA Cheerleaders 

Left (front to rear): Shipton Su., Shipton Sa., Ellington S., Lovejoy, Deshler, Welch, 
Sweet (mascot). 

Right (front to rear): Feather, Barton, Briggs, Washburn, Wright, LaCour. 



When men are rightly occupied, their amusement grows out 
of their work as the color -petal out of a fruitful flower. 

—John Ruskin 



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PARENTS' DAY 





Saturday, November 5, 1966 contained a new kind of excitement for Rogers 
Hall. The Students and families enjoyed an eventful day. 

Cae and Kava had worked for the first time as a team in making handcrafts 
for the fair, which was held in the basement of MacGay. The bake sale, paper- 
mache articles, Christmas decorations, R.H. cookbooks, aprons, raffles, cards, and 
paintings all made tremendous profits for the Cae and Kava Clubs; the proceeds went 
to the Kava ring die and Cae banner. 

The R. H. Negatives performed for the first time this year to make the buffet 
lunch more enjoyable. 

Following lunch, the Parent-Teachers Association had its first meeting. The 
remainder of the afternoon included the hockey game and the presentation of the 
cup to the winning team. Compliments were given to both clubs by the enthusiastic 
parents on the magnificent game and spirited cheerleading. 

This day marked a successful experiment which may have started an annual 
event in the history of Rogers Hall. 





FALL PLAYS 




Mrs. Worsham and her talented casts presented two one-act plays on Saturday 
evening, November 19 at 8:00. The first of these was a farce, The Still Alarm by 
George S. Kaufman. Jan Laundcn and Deborah Gale made fine gentlemen of the 
1940's who casually experienced a hotel fire with two rather unusual firemen, played 
by Kate DeBlois and Mandy Crocker. Lorrie LaCour played a prompt and efficient 
young bellboy. 




The second play, Mr. Flannery's Ocean by John Lewis Carlino was humorouslv 
done with an undercurrent of seriousness prevailing. Sherrill Warner portrayed the 
flamboyant old Irishman, Flannery, with great skill. Beth Bullock and Jody Land- 
wehr played newlyweds, whose honeymoon problems added much humor. Sherill 
Wickwire made a fine "Cockney" maid-tart. Catherine Cowles as the hotel manager 
and Victoria Harp as an invalid ladv did good jobs with difficult middle-aged roles. 
As children, Prudence Allen and Place Downev in their 20's beach attire made 
wonderful additions to a well done play. 

A last minute contribution to the atmosphere of the play was made bv Kathy 
Sullivan who sat under a beach umbrella and painted mad watercolors. Everyone 
agreed that Kathy displayed a hidden talent for pantomine. 



CHRISTMAS PLAY 




Christmas in the Market Place by Eric Cfozier represented this year's inter- 
pretation of the holiday spirit. The story of the Nativity narrated by Old Melchior, 
Karen Anderson, from ancient manuscripts began the gypsy revival of Christmas Eve. 
Colomba, Betty Hall, exhibited her versatility in the portrayal of several, varied char- 
acters who welcome the Messiah or remain convincingly skeptical of a Savior's 
coming. Joey and Maria, Kathy Beers and Valerie Morgan, played the allegorical 
roles of Joseph and A4ary by producing various props from an ingenuous gypsy 
wagon that dominated the plav's scenerv. Energv and agility accompanied the role 
of Bruno, Marion Eddy, while she danced and glided across the stage as angel or 
shepherd. The tone of a play within a plav drew the audience to a more personal 
level with the girls on the stage. When the Nativity plav ended with the final curtain, 
the image of dancing gypsies played on. 




CHRISTMAS VESPERS 

On Sunday, December 11, the traditional Christmas Vespers service was held. 
The program was conducted by Gretchen Valade, president of the Student Council, 
who commenced by reading from the Bible. 

This vear there was a deviation from the usual program in that the French IV 
class acted out a revised Christmas verson of Winnie the Pooh. After this fine ver- 
sion was completed, Kathleen Kiley, Carol Gadd, Christina Wright, Danelle Hahn 
and Pamela Bell read their themes about the senses of Christmas. Following the 
readings, The Spanish and French Clubs each sang some lovely carols. The Glee 
Club and the Octet also sang some of their seasonal selections. The climactic point of 
the ceremony was reached when Miss Ramsay presented to the seniors their rings. 
The program was concluded when everyone sang "Oh, Come All Ye Faithful". 




SPRING PLAYS 



This spring Mrs. Worsham paced, yelled, and pulled her twiggy hair out — 
the traumas involved in producing four one-act masterpieces. Another experiment 
with the R. H. theatre-in-the-round was done for three of these plays. 




The Case of the Crushed Petunias by Tennessee Williams was a light satire 
on New England propriety symbolized by the shopkeeper, Miss Dorothy Simple, 
portrayed by Pru Allen, who was sold on EMANCIPATION by the ail-American 
salesman, Kathy Beers. Adding humor to the production were Doris Bell as a police- 
man and Betty Hall as Mrs. Dull. 




Also done was the R. H. interpretation of Schnitzler's The Farewell Suffer, a 
humorous episode about the end of love. Sherri Warner and Cathy Cowles battled 
for the oysters, the wine, and the upper hand, while Marion Eddy looked on in 
amused tolerance. Toni Pollak made an efficient, eyebrow-raising waiter. 



SPRING PLAYS 




The popular A Sunny Morning, Avritten by Quintero, was done on the floor 
using only the simplest scenery and props. The mood of the play was transmitted 
to the audience soley by the subtle humor of the situation of former lovers meeting 
again in old age. The old couple were effectively portrayed by Kate DeBlois and 
Gretchen Valade. Ann Hemingway and Lorrie LaCour did fine jobs as their servants. 




The only play done on stage in one of the year's most attractive sets was the 
farcical Goodnight Caroline by Conrad Seiler. The absurd characters played by 
Jodi Landwehr as a spoiled wife and Isabella Kinney as a soft-hearted thief moved 
the audience from the realities to the fantasies of modern living. Jan Laundon as the 
distraught husband and Amy Wilson as a slipshod maid added greatly to the fun. 



COMMENCEMENT PLAY 

On Monday evening, June 5th, Rogers Hall presented The Mouse That Roared, 
a two act comedy adapted by Christopher Sergei from the book by Leonard Wibber- 
ley. When the sale of their only export is jeopardized, a tinv European duchy is 
triumphantly led to accidental victory over the United States by its beautiful young 
sovereign played very well by Catherine Cowles. Katharine Beers superblv portrayed 
Tully Bascom, a backwoodsman, placed in charge of the Fenwickian forces sent 
explicitly to lose the war, in order for the duchy to achieve rehabilitation in true 
United States style. The forces capture Professor Kokintz, cleverlv played by Kate 
DeBlois and the professor's Q-bomb. The Grand Fenwick soldiers presented a 
comic contrast to the seriousness of the United States President and its General 
Snippet, plaved efficiently by Karen Anderson and Jan Laundon. Prudv Allen as 
U. S. Secretary of State, badly in need of tranquilizers, and Sherri Warner and Isabel 
Kinney as embattled Fenwickian diplomats added greatly to the fun. 

The set, designed by Mrs. Perloff had many delightful and colorful features 
based on a red, white, and blue motif. Mr. Conger and his chemistry class created 
a surrealist laboratory that drew a round of applause. 

The play's theme — the idea of achieving peace by placing nuclear weapons in 
the keeping of a "tiny twenty" — is particularly apropos in this time of international 
strife over Vietnam and the Middle East. 

Cast of Characters 
(in order of appearance) 

Tully Bascom Katharine Beers 

Jane Pamela Bell 

Mary Cvnthia Brox 

Fran Toni Pollak 

Pam Elizabeth Bullock 

The above four girls also appear as Columbia University students 

Ann Place Downey 

Count Mountjoy Sherrill Warner 

David Benter Isabella Kinney 

Page Ann Hemingway 

Gloriana the Twelfth Catherine Cowles 

Norma Deborah Gale 

Helen Lorraine LaCour 

Mr. Beston Prudence Allen 

Miss Johnson Elizabeth Hall 

Professor Kokintz Katherine DeBlois 

Mrs. Reiner Kathleen Sullivan 

General Snippet Jan Laundon 

Wac Jill Sherill Wickwire 

Wac Debhie Jodi Landwehr 

President of U.S Karen Anderson 

Announcer Cynthia Mack 

Tom Mulligan Marion Eddy 

Soldiers of Grand Fenwick .... Gayle DeBell, Katharine Harvey, Suzanne Johnson 

Cynthia Mack, Carol Rowley, Lynne Tatian 

Will Tatum Marion Eddy 

Miss Wilkins Amy Wilson 

Mrs. Bascom Deborah Pletscher 

Scenes: The Duchy of Grand Fenwick 

A lab at Columbia University 

Washington, D.C. 



FATHER-DAUGHTER DAY 




On April 22nd the fathers arrived for the traditional day of activities with their 
daughters. Due to poor weather, the usual barbecue and softball game were re- 
placed by a luncheon in MacGay and relay races in the gym. It was rather doubtful 
if the fathers would survive some of the strenuous races. 

The conclusion of the afternoon's activities was the program of the Water Ballet. 
After this, the fathers and daughters spent a few hours relaxing for the evening's 
dinner and dance. 

A buffet supper was followed by a dance during which the fathers were en- 
tertained by skits acted out by their darling daughters. These included musical and 
comical scenes ranging from an original version of "Oh, You Wonderful Dad!" to a 
comical ballet act. 

After the skits the dancing recommenced. The fathers appeared quite uncoor- 
dinated as they tried to keep up with their daughters' newest dance steps but they 
did admirably. 

The Fathers' Day event ended with tired but happy fathers and daughters. 





WATER BALLET 




Seated: Briggs, Allen, Bell D., Fisher, Wilson D., Peck, Shipton Su., Fuller, Tikellis, 
Maggy, Rowley, Shipton Sa. 

Standing: Barton, Whitehead, Shepard, Bacon, Kirchmaier, Hahn, Welch, Deshler, 
Pletscher, Sullivan, Cowles, Thomas (Manager). 



One of the high points of the Fathers' Day event was the Water Ballet. In a 
sequence of four scenes and a grand finale, the theme of "The New Generation" was 
very well executed. The program was distinguished bv original costumes and swim- 
ming feats. The skillful swimmers enjoyed performing for their non-critical audience 
and the Water Ballet was a highly successful event. 





Chatting Poolside 



Chink! 



FOUNDER'S DAY 

By noontime May 6, most of the alumnae arrived for their reunion at Rogers 
Hall. ' 

The day started with the opening of the Senior Fair in MacGay. The Fail 
consisted of numerous interesting articles as well as the usual bakery products. 

After the Fair the alumnae went to a luncheon at which The Octet sang and 
was later joined by the guests in singing the school song. 

The alumnae meeting was held after the luncheon during which time the girls 
babysat for the children and enjoved the Fair. 

The climax of the day was the entertainment in the gvm. The Glee Club sang 
some of its selections after which one of the skits from Fathers' Day was performed. 
Everyone moved to the poolroom for a scene from the Water Ballet which was very 
well executed. 

The alumnae left with the impression that Rogers Hall was just as they had left 
it and looked forward to their next reunion. 




You're looking swell, Dolly 



PROM 




The senior prom merged into a full weekend this vear. For the first time, a 
few of the boys arrived Friday night for a gathering at MacGay, which was high- 
lighted by Bob Lasher of Noble and Greenough with his folk music. 

More of the quests arrived Saturday morning for walks in the park and games 
of softball, lacrosse, and tennis. Lunch at MacGay was followed by a movie. 

The evening's activities began as couples crossed the bridge onto the dance floor 
throwing coins in the goldfish-filled pond below. The room was gay with movement 
as soon as the popular "Nobody Special" band from Governor Dummer Academy 
began to play. Later in the evening all attention was focused on the R. H. Negatives 
who left us trying to figure out their finale. 

Fortunately for all, the weather remained beautiful all weekend. The under- 
grads enjoyed the sunshine on Sundav by relaxing around the fireplace with a steak 
sandwich brunch. The seniors and their friends also took full advantage of the sun 
by spending an enjoyable day at the home of Valerie Morgan in Winchester. 





Cheese 



We are certainly groovy 




But my mother wouldn't let me out . . 



Everything's coming up roses . 



CLASS DAY AWARDS 
1967 

CLUB CUPS 

Hockev CAE Swimming KAVA 

Volleyball CAE Badminton CAE 

Basketball KAVA Tennis KAVA 

INDIVIDUAL AWARDS 

Badminton Doris Bell 

Tennis Susan Shipton 

Posture Cup Katharine Beers 

RED CROSS LIFE SAVING 

Junior Life Saving Senior Life Saving 

Elizabeth Hall Karen Anderson Carol Rowley 

Christina Lefferts Edith Fletcher Sandra Shipton 

Deborah Pletscher Fay Sutton 

R. H. AWARDS . . . Given to those who have earned a total of seventy or more 

points in one year. Points are given for athletic ability, 
sportsmanship, captains, managers, water ballet, posture and 
neatness. 

CAE KAVA 

Prudence Allen Vanessa Vallis Hillary Barton Barrie Feather 

Doris Bell Amy-Jo Whitehead Susan Briggs Lorraine LaCour 

Janet Kendall Deborah Wilson Marian Crocker Carol Rowley 

Lydia Deshler Sandra Shipton 

Catherine Welch 

NEATNESS AWARDS 

Hall Estela Alvarez - Toni Pollak 

MacGay Charlotte Brohard - Laura Lockwood 

First Floor Gayle DeBell - Sandra Hall 

Second Floor Janet Kendall - Amy-Jo Whitehead 

ANNOUNCEMENT OF CLUB OFFICERS FOR NEXT YEAR 

CAE KAVA 

President Katherine DeBlois President Elizabeth Fuller 

Vice-President Amy Wilson Vice-President .. Kathryn Kirchmaier 

Cheerleader Deborah Pletscher Cheerleader Anne Washburn 



COMMENCEMENT 

Commencement activities began on Sunday morning, June 4, at a baccalaureate 
service at All Souls Church. The Reverend Joseph Simone gave the graduates an 
inspiring farewell sermon. After the service a lovely reception was given in the 
parish hall for the seniors and their parents. 

MUSICALE 

A musicale given on Sunday afternoon by the Glee Club under the direction 
of Miss Dorothy LeButt featured songs by Mozart, Thompson, and RodgeTS. A high- 
light of the program was a folk song written by Gretchen Valade. In addition, 
Martha Chigas and Miss LeButt gave Schumann's Piano Concerto in A Minor an 
outstanding rendition. 

Senior Luncheon 

On Monday, the Senior Luncheon was a festive affair. The place cards were 
clever replicas of the columns and the humorous verses and gifts prepared for each 
senior by the undergrads added greatly to the fun. 

Class Day 

Class Day exercises were held for the first time in the gym, a cooler, more 
spacious atmosphere. After the athletic awards, all club officers for 67-68 were 
announced. The Will and Prophecy, read by Debbie Gale and Cathy Cowles 
respectively, were greeted enthusiastically. The program closed on a nostalgic note, 
the singing of the undergraduate song and the senior song. 

Graduation • 

Graduation morning dawned, ideallv sunny and beautiful. At 9:00 the seniors 
gathered on the front lawn to have their last group picture taken. Against the vibrant 
greens of the grounds their lovely white dresses and coral roses made a sparkling 
contrast. 

At 9:30 the reception line formed and the seniors graciously greeted their 
friends and relations. At 10:00 the telling sound of "Pomp and Circumstance" floated 
from the gymnasium as first the undergraduates, then the faculty, and finally the 
seniors marched in. 

The exercises began with Dr. David Latham, president of the Board of 
Trustees, who greeted everyone and made us aware of his deep interest in our educa- 
tions. He then introduced the Very Reverend Charles H. Buck, Jr. of St. Paul's 
Cathedral, Boston, who gave the commencement address. Rev. Buck told a true 
story of five Polynesian boys who survived shipwreck for fifteen months by wisely 
using three things available to them: what nature had provided, what former inhabi- 
tants had left, and what their simple faith afforded them. He advised the seniors of 
their need to rely on nature, their fellowman, and God. 

After Dr. Latham had conferred the diplomas, Miss Ramsay spoke briefly to 
the class and then awarded the school honors to deserving students. Sandra Hall 
presented the class gift, a loudspeaker system to the gym, used for the fiirst time at 
the commencement play and these closing exercises. 

Finally, the recessional began and the seniors formed the traditional floral 
arc under which the undergraduates passed. Goodbyes rang across the yard and 
thus the long awaited morning ended. 



AWARDS AND HONORS 
1967 

UNDERHILL HONOR - COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Catherine Cowles 

PARSONS HONOR - GENERAL COURSE 
Sandra Shipton 

HONOR ROLL - AVERAGE 85% or above 
Prudence Allen Charlotte Brohard Place Downey 

Karen Anderson Catherine Cowles Nancy Nields 

Lindsay Bacon Lydia Deshler Cynthia Tomsu 

HELEN HILL AWARD 

Gretchen Valade 

ATHLETIC AWARD 

Doris Bell 

ART PRIZE 
Gayle DeBell 

ART SURVEY AWARDS 

Senior Gavle DeBell Undergraduate .... Sherrill Warner 

DRAMATICS 

Prudence Allen 

Who, as Hamlet directs, suits "the action to the-word, the word to the action." 

Honorable Mention 
for "Moments of Greatness" during the vear. 
Karen Anderson Katherine DeBlois Jan Laundon 

Katharine Beers Marion Eddy Gretchen Valade 

Catherine Cowles Isabella Kinney Sherrill Warner 

Jodi Landwehr 

MUSIC APPRECIATION 
Martha Chigas Cynthia Brox 

Honorable Mention 
Estela Alvarez Katherine DeBlois Fay Sutton 

Karen Anderson Lydia Deshler Gretchen Valade 

Martha Baker Marion Eddv Sherill Wickwire 

Susan Briggs Edith Fletcher Deborah Zinn 

Linda Lovejoy 
Susan Spring 

CURRENT EVENTS 

Seniors Prudence Allen Undergraduate Amy Wilson 

Sandra Shipton 

Honorable Mention 
Karen Anderson Lydia Deshler Lynne Tatian 

Catherine Cowles Elizabeth Fuller Deborah Zinn 

KATHARINE WHITTEN MacGAY LITERARY PRIZES 
Seniors Sherill Wickwire ... Whose thoughts come "in riffles of 

designed words." 
Undergraduates .... Elizabeth Bullock ... For whom there will always he "a song 

in the wind." 



ALLEN, Prudence, R.D. #2, Fairview, Pennsylvania 

ALVAREZ, Estela, 85-11 Avon Street, Jamaica, New York 

ANDERSON, Karen, 39 Daniels Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

BACON, Lindsay, 1127 Ranfield Lane, Flint, Michigan 

BAKER, Martha, 138 Brigham Hill Road, North Grafton, Massachusetts 

BARON, Hillary, 658 Nimes Road, Los Angeles, California 

BECK, Sandra, 4 Rustic Drive, Cohasset, Massachusetts 

BEERS, Katharine, 214 Southdown Road, Huntington, Long Island, New York 

BELL, Doris, 26 Crescent Road, Riverside, Connecticut. 

BELL, Pamela, 83 Beacon Street, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

BRIGGS, Susan, Carefree Apts., Box #4811, Cable Beach, Nassau, Bahama Islands 

BRION, Donna, Skunks Misery Road, Locust Valley, Long Island, New York 

BROHARD, Charlotte, 73 Weeks Avenue, Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York 

BROX, Cynthia, 192 North Lowell Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

BROWN, Susan, 56 Monadnock Road, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

BULLOCK, Elizabeth, P. O. Box #243, Johnsonville, South Carolina 

CHIGAS, Martha, 7 Andover Road, Billerica, Massachusetts 

COPELAND, Genevieve, R.D. #1, Box #448, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania 

CORROON, Donna, Piping Rock Road, Locust Valley, Long Island, New York 

COWLES, Catherine, 332 Iroquois Avenue, Green Bav, Wisconsin 

CROCKER, Marian, 184 School Street, Milton, Massachusetts 

DeBELL, Gayle, 11 Oriole Drive, Andover, Massachusetts 

DeBLOIS, Katherine, Fairhaven Hill, Concord, Massachusetts 

DESHLER, Lydia, 7 Dunham Road, Scarsdale, New York 

DOREMUS, Dania, South Road, Harwinton, Connecticut 

DOWNEY, Place, 3476 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 

EDDY, Marion, 20 Edbert Drive, New Britain, Connecticut 

ELLINGTON, Katherine, 424 Ocampo Drive, Pacific Palisades, California 

ELLINGTON, Susan, 424 Ocampo Drive, Pacific Palisades, California 

FEATHER, Barrie, 443 Highbrook Avenue, Pelham Manor, New York 

FISHER, Martha, 50 Drake Road, Scarsdale, New York 

FLETCHER, Edith, 67 High Street, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

FULLER, Elizabeth, 511 Mapleton Avenue, Suffield, Connecticut 

GADD, Carol, 33 Stoner Drive, West Hartford, Connecticut 

GALE, Deborah, 8 Copeland Avenue, Reading, Massachusetts 

GODDEN, Louise, 45 Sunset Rock Road, Andover, Massachusetts 

HAHN, Danelle, 104 Chester Avenue, Garden City, Long Island, New York 

HALL, Elizabeth, 345 Nahant Road, Nahant, Massachusetts 

HALL, Sandra, 345 Nahant Road, Nahant, Massachusetts 

HARP, Victoria, 28 Maple Street, P. O. Box #856, Hanover, New Hampshire 

HARVEY, Katharine, 2025 Gratiot Avenue, Saginaw, Michigan 

HEMINGWAY, Ann, 81 Glenbrook Drive, Cheshire, Connecticut 

HOLIHAN, Felicity, 68 Salem Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

HUNT, Meredith, 270 Jerusalem Road, Cohasset, Massachusetts 

INNES, Georgia, 93 Edwards Lane, Atherton, California 

JOHNSON, Suzanne, Hillside Road, Greenwich, Connecticut 

KEAST, Marilyn, 45 Three Ponds Road, Wayland, Massachusetts 

KENDALL, Janet, 61 Laurelwood Road, Holden, Massachusetts 



KINNEY, Isabella, 401 Summer Street, Manchester, Massachusetts 

KIRCHMAIER, Kathryn, 28683 East River Road, Perrysburg, Ohio 

LaCOUR, Lorraine, 15 Hillside Road, New London, Connecticut 

LANDWEHR, Jodi, 98 South Division, Holland, Michigan 

LAUNDON, Jan, Sachem's Head, Guilford. Connecticut 

LEFFERTS Christina, 292 Washington Boulevard, Springfield, Massachusetts 

LEOFF, Francine, 11 George Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

LOCKWOOD, Laura, 79 Eastway, Mount Kisco, New York 

LOVEJOY, Linda, 2201 Lehigh Station Road, Pittsford, New York 

MACK, Cvnthia, 178 Seven Bridge Road, Chappaqua, New York 

MAGGY, Leslie, 17 Mario Court, Walnut Creek, California 

McILVAIN, Alida, 1109 Beech Road, Rosemont, Pennsylvania 

McKALLAGAT, Lee, 135 Academy Road, North Andover, Massachusetts 

MORGAN, Valerie, 10 Berkshire Drive, Winchester, Massachusetts 

NIELDS, Nancy, Monument Street, Concord, Massachusetts 

PAINE, Beverly, 13 Bayberry Lane, Exeter, New Hampshire 

PARKINSON, Martha, Keveney Lane, Yarmouth, Massachusetts 

PECK, Ellen, Yellow Cote Road, Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York 

PLETSCHER, Deborah, 1647 Brockway Street, Saginaw, Michigan 

PLIMPTON, Eliza, Old Sudbury Road, South Lincoln, Massachusetts 

PLIMPTON, Nicola, Old Sudbury Road, South Lincoln, Massachusetts 

POLLAK, Toni, 63 Atlantic Avenue, Apt. 5D, Boston, Massachusetts 

PRYOR, Linda, 101 Beacon Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

ROWLEY, Carol, 10 Meriam Street, Lexington, Massachusetts 

SAUNDERS, Colleen, 589 Mountain Avenue, North Caldwell, New Jersey 

SCANNELL, Claire, 131 Holvrood Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

SELLER, Jane, 789 Colrain Road, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

SHEPARD, Katharine, 125 Hillside Road, Kensington, Connecticut 

SHIPTON, Sandra, 953 West Street, Pittsneld, Massachusetts 

SHIPTON, Susan, 953 West Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

SLIMMON, Betsey, 555 Hill Farm Road, Fairfield, Connecticut 

SMITH, Nancy, Manley Street, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

SPRING, Susan, 4 Elm Street, Concord, Massachusetts 

STRASBURG, Elizabeth, 6671 MacArthur Boulevard, Washington, D.C. 

SULLIVAN, Kathleen, Box #405, Rancho Santa Fe, California 

SUTTON, Fay, Cousins Island, Yarmouth, Maine 

SWEET, Jo Anne, 494 North Main Street, Gloversville, New York 

TATIAN, Lvnne, 57 Lexington Avenue, Bradford, Massachusetts 

TEMPLET, 'Suzanne, Dover Road, Box #208, Guilford, Maine 

THOMAS, Mary, 109 Overhill Road, Baltimore, Maryland 

TIGHE, Johanna, 23 Holyrood Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

TIKELLIS, Pamela, 19 Perth Drive, Wilmington, Delaware 

TOMSU, Cynthia, 3180 Gratiot Avenue, Port Huron, Michigan 

VALADE, Gretchen, 37 Willow Lane, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan 

VALLIS, Vanessa, 109 Lowell Street, Lynnfield, Massachusetts 

WALKER, Challis, 1508 South Shore Drive, Erie, Pennsylvania 

WARNER, Sherrill, 33 Cove Circle, Marion, Massachusetts 

WASHBURN, Anne, Red Stone Hill, Plainville, Connecticut 



WELCH, Catherine, 9 Lake Place, Brandford, Connecticut 
WHITEHEAD, Amy-Jo, 3259 Polo Drive, Delray Beach, Florida 
WICKWIRE, Sherill, Locust Avenue, Homer, New York 
WILSON, Amy, 7 Prospect Street, Willamstown, Massachusetts 
WILSON, Deborah, 1270 Andover Street, Tewksburv, Massachusetts 
WILLS, Susan, 37 Coolidge Avenue, Lexington, Massachusetts 
WINTER, Katharine, 60 South Main Street, Suffield, Connecticut 
WRIGHT, Christina, Groton School, Groton, Massachusetts 
ZINN, Deborah, Ballwood Road, Old Greenwich, Connecticut 

FACULTY 

RAMSAY, Miss Hildred, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

MacGAY, Mrs. Katharine, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

JONES, Mrs. Howard, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

STATEN, Mrs. Louise, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

CROSBIE, Mrs. Barbara, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

ALEXANDER, Miss Doris, c/o L. D. Alexander, R.D., Box #229 Constantia, N.Y. 

BENTLEY, Mrs. Charlotte, 15 John Turco Dr., c/o Wm. Thurlow, Walpole, Mass. 

BOWES, Miss Carol, 2 Tupelo Road, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

CALHOUN, Mrs. Barbara 7 Chestnut Street, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

COLPITTS, Mrs. Stephen, 18 Winter Street, Plymouth, New Hampshire 

CONGER, Rev. George M., R.F.D. #1, Trapelo Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts 

DION, Miss Nancy, 59 Orchardview Street, West Springfield, Massachusetts 

DOWNES, Mrs. Louise, St. Anne's Rectory, Merrimack St., Lowell, Massachusetts 

JONES, Mrs. Agnes C, 20 Fenwick Drive, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

LANDIS, Miss Janet, 2244 Hobson Road. Lancaster, Pennsylvania 

LATOUR, Mrs. Edward, 202 Parkview Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

LeBUTT, Miss Dorothy, 144 Pine Street, Portland, Maine 

MILLER, Mrs. Ray, 28 Gerson Terrace, Lowell, Massachusetts 

PERLOFF, Mrs. John, 162 Linmoor Terrace, Lexington, Massachusetts 

PHELPS, Miss Dorothy, High Street, R.F.D., Norwell, Massachusetts 

PULLING, Miss Anne, 17 Louisburg Square, Boston, Massachusetts 

ROBINSON, Miss Carol, 73 Raven Road, Lowell, Massachusetts 

SARGENT, Mrs. Marjorie, Ogunquit, Maine 

SCALISE, Rev. Victor, 222 Liberty Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

SWAN, Miss Grace, 61 Nesmith Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

TALBOT, Mrs. Charles, 112 Clark Road, Lowell, Massachusetts 

WORSHAM, Mrs. Banks, Partridge Lane, Carlisle, Massachusetts 

******** 

IRISH, Miss Elizabeth, 396 East Merrimack Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
MACK, Mr. Harold, 105 Pleasant Street, Ayer, Massachusetts 
MICHEL, Mrs. Leopold, Wadden Court, Marblehead, Massachusetts 
NESSLAGE, Miss Ann, 36 Pondfield Road West, Bronxville, New York 
NICHOLS, Miss Betty, 11600 East 16th Avenue, Aurora, Colorado 
PASSMORE, Mrs. Clarence, Belfast Road, Camden, Maine 
WHITE, Mrs. George H., 5 Elmer Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 










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FOND 



MEMORIES 






FOND 



FAREWELLS 





Oplint 



ers 




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Spring Number 

Nineteen Hundred and Sixty-eight 




nters 



Editor-in-Chief 
Elizabeth Bullock 

Literary Board 



Donna Brion 
Charlotte Brohard 
Place Downey 



Katherine DeBlois 
Kathryn Kirchmaier 



Business Board 
Manager— Lindsay Bacon 



Sherrill Warner 



Editor- 



Art 
-Laura Lockwood 



Art Contributors 



Sandra Beck 
Donna Brion 
Elizabeth Bullock 
Dania Doremus 
Suzanne Johnson 
Marilyn Keast 
Isabel Kinney 
Jodi Landwehr 



Sherrill Warner 



Jodi Landwehr 
Francine Leoff 
Christina Wright 



Cynthia Mack 
Claire Scannell 



Jan Laundon 
Wendy Martin 
Alida McIlvain 
Betsy Nauss 
Heather Russell 
Deborah Seaman 
Lisa Strasburg 
Fay Sutton 



n 



Informal Photographer— Lorraine LaCour 

Faculty Literary Advisor 
Mrs. Banks S. Worsham 



Faculty Art Advisor 
Mrs. John Perloff 



Table of Contents 



4. Obtrusive Journey Lisa Strasburg 

5. Old Weeping Willow Kim Kirchmaier 

Ink Drawing Fay Sutton 

6. Omnes Potentes Anne Young 

Invitation Lisa Strasburg 

7. Silent Night Donna Brion 

Alone Kristen Lape 

8. Oil Painting Elizabeth Bullock 

9. Conception of a Day Elizabeth Bullock 

10. A Funny Story Susan Brown 

The Trouble with Pronouns Lee McKallagat 

11. Sgraffito Design Heather Russell 

The Daisy Betty Hall 

12. The Fugitive Donna Brion 

o 

Political Comment Jodi Landwehr 

13. Timely Tale for Vertical Readers .. Kim Kirchmaier 

14. The Disappearance Pamela Saba 

Pencil Sketch Isabel Kinney 

15. Ode to Black Bart 

and Pencil Illustration Sherrill Warner 

16. Photograph Fay Sutton 

17. Glass Vision Lisa Strasburg 

18. On Communication 

and Pencil Sketch Sandra Beck 

The Moment Katharine Shevard 

19. Union 

and Pencil Drawing Jodi Landwehr 

A Remembrance Donna Brion 

20. Note to Music ., Elizabeth Bullock 

The Conquest Isabel Kinney 

Common Ear Notes Francine Leoff 

21. Scratchboard Laura Lockwood 

22. Pencil Illustration Elizabeth Bullock 

23. Splitting Elizabeth Bullock 

24. The Sound Kim Kirchmaier 

Ink Painting Jan Laundon 

25. Transiency Cynthia Brox 

The Choice Kim Kirchmaier 

A Lifetime Holly Holihan 

26. The Beautv of the Earth Georgia Innes 

Scratchboard Betsy Nauss 

27. Haiku Kim Kirchmaier, Lynne Tatian, 

Charlotte Brohard, Fay Sutton 
Scratchboard Betsy Nauss 

28. Levels of Poverty Lisa Strasburg 

29. Aftermath of War 

and Acrvllic Painting Laura Lockwood 

30. Photography Fay Sutton 

31. Nature Did Never Betray Lisa Strasburg 

32. Cucumber Road Katherine DeBlois 

Pencil Sketch Deborah Seaman 

33. How We Broke in the New House Cynthia Tomsu 

Pencil Drawing Jodi Landwehr 

? Jennifer Foster 

34. Mirage Susan Antonopoulos 

Lament Lynne Tatian 

35. Dazed City Fay Sutton 



Pencil Sketch Betsy Nauss 

36. Elegy of Comparison Georgia Innes 

37. Shades of Gray Lisa Strasburg 

Design Wendy Martin 

38. Morning Memory Carol Gadd 

Block Print Alida Mcllvain 

39. I Think I'll Paint the Sky Today Georgia Innes 

The Act Jodi Landwehr 

40. Lines and Colors Lindsay Bacon 

Before Dawn Amy Wilson 

The Assignment Elizabeth Bullock 

41. Acrvllic Painting Marilyn Keast 

42. A Storm Laura Lockwood 

Transition Sherrill Warner 

Charcoal Drawing Alida Mcllvain 

43. Sanctuary Lisa Strasburg 

Scratchboard Marilyn Keast 

Haiku Jodi Landwehr 

Pencil Sketch Deborah Seaman 

44. Today Alida Mcllvain 

Pencil Sketch Sandra Beck 

45. Analogy Place Downey 

Between Dania Doremus 

Connotation Lisa Strasburg 

46. Wintered Youth Elizabeth Bullock 

47. Pencil Drawing Elizabeth Bullock 

48. Message Kim Kirchmaier 

Torment Alida Mcllvain 

Parting Katherine Winter 

49. Closer for the Kill Betsey Slimmon 

Acryllic Painting Laura Lockwood 

50. Afternoon in the Field Elizabeth Laing 

The Genius and the Imbecile Kim Kirchmaier 

51. An Image Alida Mcllvain 

Crayon Drawing Lisa Strasburg 

Old Egg Shells Raleigh Perkins 

52. An Inflection Alida Mcllvain 

Ink Print Jan Laundon 

53. The Interruption Elizabeth Bullock 

Impressions of Hell Donna Brion 

54. Riding Lesson Francine Leoff 

Mistaken Deborah Jones 

55. April Kim Kirchmaier 

Linoleum Cut Isabel Kinney 

56. Trigger for Surrender Lisa Strasburg 

On Reflections Truda Bloom 

57. Which Way? Georgia Innes 

Ink Sketch Lisa Strasburg 

58. Savior Peace 

and Oil Painting Donna Brion 

59. Cat's Sight Georgia Innes 

60. The View Raleigh Perkins 

Sgraffito Design Suzanne Johnson 

Creek Toni Pollak 

61. Believe It or Not Martha Parkinson 

Collage Dania Doremus 







Vol. 76 Literary, 1968 No. 1 



Editorial 

The ego is the vital core and the essence of the individual. The power of the 
ego is incalculable and man forever attempts to harness this force. Demands and 
experiences compel men to contemplate their beings with honesty while at the same 
moment they cause men to direct blockades to protect their centers. Whether this 
center, this axis, is referred to as the ego, the soul, or the mind is unimportant. What 
is important is that man honestlv evaluate himself, that is, his ego, and his relation- 
ships to other men and his surroundings. 

Of course, man is basically alone, but he alone does not form his ego. His 
relationships to others are a necessity for perceptiveness of himself and of his environ- 
ment. A critical objectivity of the functions of self, others, and their products is of 
considerable importance. With greater intellectual comprehension of his ego, man 
will see more clearly magnified his beauty and his flaws as an individual and as part of 
a mass. In addition, man must realize that he is responsible for his brother. Man must 
understand and be understood and naturally the well-being of a people is also that of 
a single individual. 

Ultimately, man exists with a degree of inflation of the ego. If this inflated 
self does not encroach upon other men, then he has obviously some understanding of 
his being and he will inflict fewer frustrations on others. 

There are innumerable facets to the ego, and adding to its complexities is the 
fact that the subconscious creates illusions; therefore, the conscious is not always able 
to touch upon reality by reasoning. Without being able to link the conscious to the 
subconscious there can can be no fully meaningful expression or final satisfaction. 
When man gains awareness of this alien within himself— the dark side of himself— the 
problem arises of how to cope with this whole being. In his struggle, he often willfully 
subjects himself to undermining forces and evades his truth by outlets with imaginary 
or half answers. He flounders about and attempts to make changes within himself by 
changing his surroundings. He turns towards a variety of religious sects and false 
supports such as drugs, alcohol, and economic and social symbols of status. 

But man must come to realize that his life cannot be steered by gods, but by 
himself. He must recognize that he did not create all, but with himself he has the 
power to aim, build upon, alter and cope. Man should not identify himself with, or 
depend upon, others. He must allow himself to be impressed, but he must be sure 
that he fully understands his motives for action and, that under his own codes, they 
are just. Rightly, for some people, there occurs a problem of resistance to a system 
set up by a mass, for the mass, but imposed upon the individual. Inevitably, these 
people must make an agonizing search for a truth that will not harm the mass but 
will enable them to be faithful to themselves; that is the formula for survival, yet the 
truth remains that being faithful to oneself is often eventual annihilation, and survival 
is compromise. 

Man must eventually view himself and his relationships in perspective. All 
things must be weighed in correct proportion. Through all of man's many complexi- 
ties and opposing forces, he must be regarded with the greatest admiration and love 
for his will to conquer, endure and survive. 



Obtrusive Journey 

to love 

a demand 

to love is simple 

but to live with love 

is bitter sweet 

as is payment for anything priceless 

to have a lover 

has property of an uncut diamond 

the breath of a smoky spring 

to love 

is a perception far beyond liking 

with mastery to strive with painful patience 

for only occasional satisfaction 

to love 

is to make the other 

a little better. 

Foil names are fabricated . . . 

for what eventually acquires its own 

inevitable uniqueness 

of power and respect 

has no equal substitute 

Lisa Strasburg '69 




Old weeping willow 
ready to sleep forever 
hanging tiredly 



Kim Kirchmaier '68 



^^^^ 



Omnes Potentes 

How glorious it would be 

if man possessed the power 

to give and take away . . . 

to dominate all living things . . . 

to determine life and death to 

the extreme of choosing those in his surrounds, 

to banish all his dislikes into 

another world or dimension; 

And vet man has the power to love and hate 

and look at what he has done with these 

omnes potentes . . . 

Ann Young 70 



Moon Rider 

I lay and rode the moonlight 
Upward through the errant boughs. 
The wind cascaded downward 
Full of light and memory 
And in the softness of night 
I slept under her gentle tide. 

Kim Kirchmaier '68 



Invitation 

A quaint, beautiful ballad 
sung by gentle voices, 
monopolizing the thin air, 
speaking to the lonely soul 
of another, 

who longs to enter blindly 
the inviting fantasy . . . 

Lisa Strasburg '69 



Silent Night 

Rain fell as a mist from the darkened sky and a strong wind whipped the tiny 
drops against my cheeks. As I scuffed along the wet pavement I shoved my hands far- 
ther into my pockets away from the weather. Few street lights remained lit because 
of the riot which had occurred the night before. One lonely light shone by the corner 
and the illuminated mist fell like silver chiffon upon the sparkling cement. 

All remained motionless and silent but the wind which, like a broom, swept 
the litter from the street and sent it swirling down the sidewalks. I stood near the 
light and leaned against the crumbling brick wall staring pensively down the block. 
Couples sat huddled on steps and in doorways half asleep, for there was nowhere to go. 

Suddenly the silence was broken bv heavy, syncopated steps slapping the 
drenched sidewalk. As the sound drew nearer, the couples began to disperse from the 
doorways and to shuffle down the street as if they had a planned destination. They 
made not a sound. I relieved the wall of my weight and walked quietly down the 
block. No one remained stationary. No one could tell from which direction the patrol 
came, so they kept moving aimlessly through the darkened streets. 

From around the right hand corner appeared a cold yellow light which dis- 
tinguished the larger raindrops now forming, but not the figures which stood behind 
it. At this my knees weakened and my heart pounded rapidly; however, I knew it was 
necessary to compose myself. I slunk forward staring at the pavement directly in front 
of me like a cowed dog and passed the entire patrol without giving them as much as 
a glance. I released the breath, I had been holding, in a long sigh. At this moment, the 
patrol stopped and shined the light on me. Blindly I continued to scuff down the 
walk and a cold sweat beaded my brow. Finally they withdrew the light and con- 
tinued on. 

It was early morning and now the rain fell in torrents. My clothes clung to 
my body, and shivering from the cold, I searched for an empty doorway. There were 
none to be found. Resuming my place by the street light, I tilted my head backward 
letting the rain wash my face. The dawn would soon come and the night would be 
no more. 



Donna Brion '68 



Alone 

Alone in my thoughts, 

Alone in my heart, 
Alone in my mind, 

I know that I ought 
To love you now 

And respect your kind. 
But tomorrow in a crowd, 

I shall not have time 
To stop and love, 

Alone in my heart. 

Kristen Lape 70 



Conception of a Day 

The rain sifts through the winds silken 
mesh sweeping diagonally at a figure matted 
into a rock's crevice. Molten grey eyes gaze 
mindlessly along a rigid coast. 

The sea of another day washes in a story 
of untold heroes. Is it dawn or when? The 
entity has swirled into opaque silver blue 
haze. If a sun exists above this land it is 
unknown. The sea traces in faint thin lines 
under a skv which resembles a dead man's 
eye. 

Walls crumble, Grecian pillars tumble, 
land slides, all into a muddled mass. 

There, a dying, gasping soldier lies 
humped over,, like an old man, clutching his 
chest. Trying to maintain steady footing he 
extends his arm horizontally, at full length, 
against the blood-washed escarpment. He 
rests momentarily. His mind is paralyzed; his 
movements mechanical. Two last steps, right 
leg past left. His pulsing cellophane forehead 
lifts. His hair is sprayed back and he groans 
through a strange half smile into the leadened 
sky. The body sucks in a deep breath, 
hunches, slumps with a sigh and spills to the 
ground. 

The flat surface swells, thrusts high, 
curls and tumults down. The great wall of 
weight thunders and smashes mercilessly 
down. Churning and crumbling, it rivets up 
the sandy ramp ... A final greedy suck at the 
land before it is hauled back. And again it 
claws desperately at the edge. 

Elizabeth Bullock '68 



A Funny Story 

It all started when Nick wouldn't eat his breakfast because he didn't like what 
his mother had served. His mother hadn't slept well the night before and she, 
thoroughly disgusted with him, ordered him to go to his room until she called him. 

Watching the men round up the horses from his bedroom window, Nick grew 
more and moTe depressed. This wasn't the first time she had yelled at him. 

"She hates me and yells at me whenever she gets the chance," he thought. 
"Maybe life would be easier for them if I wasn't around." 

At the peak of his feeling of rejection, Nick decided he would leave home for 
a while, maybe forever. He stuffed in a small bag all the odds and ends he thought he 
would need. Lowering himself from his window, he almost turned back, but then 
went over in his mind this morning's incident at breakfast and firmly decided he 
would leave. He saddled his horse, constantly watching for someone who might walk 
in and bog him down with endless questions. 

When he was out of sight of the main cabin, the thought struck him that he 
was free. He could go aynwhere and do anything. He felt like Huck Finn only in a 
different locale. Dismounting, he rested a while on a hillside. Watching his horse 
graze, he had another thought. What was there to do? There was really nothing he 
could do except ride his horse with no place to go and eat the small amount of food 
he had brought with him. Nick started laughing. He thought what he had just done 
was ridiculously funny. He got up from the small nest he had made himself, mounted 
his horse and started home, still laughing. 

Susan Brown '69 



The Trouble With Pronouns 

Lord, do I love he, 

But his love for me 

I can not see, 

For he loves she 

And she loves he; 

That's why he and me can never be we. 

Lee McKallagat '68 



10 




The Daisy 

In all its purity 

in all its simplicity 

symbolizes love. 

Why must it be so strange to me 

that the petals always fall? 

Wait they say 

and do be gay, 

for love will come, you'll see. 

Yet the petals still fall, 

some forced by squalls, 

and Mather on the ground. 

I must be content, not callow, 

to see them lie under the willow. 

Yet I love the daisy 

in all its purity 

in all its simplicity 

with only a little yellow. 

Betty Hall '69 



11 



The Fugitive 

The sweet delicate fragrance of ginger filled the moist, thick air. The trees 
and flowers scattered about remained colorless shadows in the darkness of night and 
all was silent. 

A small man huddled shivering in a crevice covered by immense green ferns. 
His heart pounded rapidly and his whole bodv seemed to pulsate rhythmically. The 
black nothingness of space swirled about him and every shadow was his enemy. He 
began to torture himself with thoughts of being pursued by madmen or wild beasts 
which existed merely in his mind. "They are coming! I can hear them!!" he thought 
to himself as he retreated farther into the crevice. Alas, he was alone and helpless. 

Stars pierced the velvet sky like sewn diamonds, and the moonlight filtered 
through the trees forming patterns of darkness on the ground. Nothing lurked among 
the shadows, all was still. All but a singular fugitive rested in this night. 

Donna Brion '68 



Political Comment 

The Viet vet returns unrewarded 
While more youths are herded 
up and hauled off to slaughter. 
The black mass rebels on a tide 
of constant unrest. 
A country splits 
And Johnson sits. 

Tom Landwehr '68 



12 



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once 


war 


they 


of 


then 


the 


upon 


the 


were 


their 


one 


arms 


a 

time 

there 


dying 

the 

dead 


not 

upset 

they 


dead 

bodies 

they 


day 
the 
radio 


race 
they 
were 


was 
a 


they 
did 


calmly 
framed 


claimed 
to 


said 
that 


out 
to 


great 


not 


the 


hate 


the 


win 


society 
it 


worry 
for 


telegram 
that 


violence 
but 


non- 
existent 


win 
what 


mocked 


the 


said 


their 


war 


they 


the 


government 


their 


eyes 


was 


fought 


dead 


said 


sons 


hungrily 


real 


and 


devoured 


there 


had 


searched 


and 


fought 


the 


was 


died 


the 


the 


and 


living 


no 


bravely 


newspapers 


people 


fought 


and 


war 


in 


for 


were 


tension 


lived 


when 


the 


articles 


terrified 


protest 


in 


their 


war 


on 


they 


tension 


fear 


eldest 


that 


death 


began 


patriots 


and 


sons 


didn't 


sadism 


to 


tension 


hate 


began 


exist 


war 


pour 


traitors 


when 


leaving 


and 


and 


their 


tension 


they 

were 

shown 

pictures 

of 


for 

active 
dutv 
and 
never 


hung 

it 

next 

to 

the 


they 
found 
plenty 
of 


money 
into 
bombs 
napalm 


commitment 
tension 
tension 
tension 


the 


returned 


pictures 


them 


missiles 


poof! 



Kim Kirchmaier '68 



13 



The Disappearance 



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There was once an eight-year-old boy who was 
crippled and confined to a wheelchair. He was very 
bored and sad at having always to stay inside, 
watching everybody else play outside. Being left to 
himself, he became interested in magic, so he 
asked his mother to pick up a book on magic at 
the library. When he had learned even' trick in 
the book, he put on a magic show for all the chil- 
dren in the neighborhood. At first, the children 
were delighted, but soon thev became tired of both 
the tricks and the little boy and left him alone once 
more. He got another book with all new tricks and 
gave a whole new show. The children loved the 
new show, but they still left the boy alone when he 
had no new tricks. It went on like this until the 
library's magic book supply was exhausted. The 
boy was left with onlv one more trick— but it was 
his greatest. It was a disappearing act. He could 
make any object disappear. He practiced and prac- 
ticed until he thought it was good enough to show. 
But he first tried it out on his mother. He set her 
down and told her he was going to make her mixing 
bowl disappear. He said a few magic words, waved 
his wand, and— POOF— his mother disappeared in- 
stead! The bov looked— and then began to cry his 
heart out! Not because his mother was gone— oh, 
no! He was crying because this had been his great- 
est trick— and the kids weren't there to see it. 
Them's the breaks! 

Pam Saba 71 






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Ode to Black Bart 



The drinks were gone 
and so were we. 
I knew that it 
was time to flee. 
"It's time to go 
my friends, me fears, 
but we shall meet 
in five more years." 

We said so-longs 
And ended our meet. 
I boarded the bus 
and found me a seat. 
I knew right then 
I'd taken to heart 
the tale of a friend 
who's named Black Bart. 

Now Bart sure was 
a funny type of guy. 
He worked from the mind 
instead of the eye. 

Abstraction was out 
and realism in. 
That's why Bart 
committed such a sin. 

To see him work 
would make you stare, 
for Bart thought beauty 
was junk in air. 

Five years later 
right on the dot 
I met the others 
at the very same spot. 
We went right in 
and finished a round 
but friend Black Bart 
was nowhere around. 




It was time to part, 
to leave "The Bear", 
but on the step 
we stopped to stare— 
for there was Bart . . . 
suspended in air, 
surrounded by junk 
and parts to spare. 

Our poor friend Bart's 
a fine example 
of man gone mad 
over pop art sample. 
He'd slaved all year 
in order to save 
what later became 
his permanent grave. 

Sherrill Warner '68 



15 



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Glass Vision 

A being . . . 

highly individualized 

placed and developing 

in two strangely opposite atmospheres; 

fascinated by the conflict between 

desire for freedom of individual principles 

and dependence on social convention. 

Being a keen observer of morals, 

this being . . . 

with outstretched hands 

and the unhardened heart of a child, 

touched delicately the distorted image seen in herself 

of another child 

who stood entangled in thinly-woven strings 

of oblique motives and anguish, 

fearful ripples of unconquered doubts 

gradually vanquished by 

innumerable awkward trials of fundamentals, 

intense struggles of self-identification, 

restlessly sighing sterile air. 

This uncertain child, too, thrust out a quavering hand . . . 

blindly ... as if gravitated 

by a cardinal force. 

This child now participating in life surroundings, 

yet retaining her integrity, 

remaining an outsider 

creeping silently into depths of spirit 

following a colorful flicker 

once magnified in the eye 

now held as a precious dream . . . 

melting in the palm of the small hand 

as it restlessly grows sweaty 

and creeps into the deep blue jean pocket 

with sand at the bottom where . . . 

it forever stays . . . 

until the next brave, warm-hearted spectator 

seeks out the entrusting wanderer capturing long-sought insight. 

For the enlightening fall 

moves on to laboring depths of winter . . . 

the being directing intentions now 

on smaller goals . . . 

protecting further depth 

in loss of pride 

draining emotions . . . 

Man's endless capabilities now narrowed 

through a shattered illusion . . . 

Lisa Strasburg '69 
17 




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On Communication 

Deep understanding is conceivable with them, 

more than one may think; 

The intellects all prefer 

to say that people can, 

in a roundabout way, 

communicate with dogs . . . 

Not only does love show its way 

to the trusting heart of many a dog, 

but the mutual spirit between me and such 

an animal is elevated above all human relations. 

People are always harboring feelings with their 

own kind, of course; 

Perhaps it would be worth it to exercise some 

dedication to or dislike of a dog who will be 

most appreciative or downcast, 

more likely than humans would, 

nowadays. 



Sandra Beck 70 



The Moment 

In breathless silence he stooped low— waiting. 

When he saw it coming he sprang up 

and grabbed it. 

With a triumphant smile he pushed it 

into his pocket for safe keeping. 

But when he sought to admire his piey— 

It was gone. 

Katie Shepard '68 



18 



Union 



"Child, your nose is running. 
Why are you alone? 
Come here let me wipe 
away your tears." 
I reach out and he 
slips his small 
black hand into mine. 
We turn and walk into 
the night. It dissolves 
my whiteness. We become 
society's children. 

Todi Landwehr '68 




A Remembrance 

A joyful memory seems hard to find 

So many an acquaintance I've left behind 

As time-future becomes time-past 

Few if any a time did last 

Although my memories are faint 

A picture of your smile I could paint. 

Donna Brion '68 



19 



Note to Music 

Sorry, it's too early in the morning. I don't operate for another forty-five minutes. 
I am copying over my essay to the good sounds of classical music. I'm also going away 
today; thus my mind is lingering anxiously at the front door. 

Faithfully, joyfully and triumphantly yours, 

Beth Bullock '68 



The Conquest 

I was thrown out of my chair when the music crashed down the aisle to my 
seat. By the time I was able to compose mvself the notes had subsided back to the 
front row. Stealthily, the notes inched their way down to my seat again, but I threw 
my English book at them and they took their place again in the front. I had to be 
very alert and watch those notes because they kept trying to sneak up on me. Then 
the battle began in earnest; it was quite a fight between the music and me. The 
windows shattered. Then the raging music deliberately hit an unknown note and 
cracked the face of the school clock. That really made me mad. With one swift hit I 
knocked all the notes high in the air and they fell flat on the the floor, dead. I had 
just conquered my first piece of music. 

Isabel Kinney '68 



Common Ear Notes 

The sounds pervade the study hall and reach my ears as harsh, flat tones. This 
is no fault of mine, however, since my ears have become accustomed to the loud 
vibrations produced by electric guitars and the noisiest drums to be found. Even 
though these dissonant sounds may seem offensive to the well-educated musical ear, 
they have somehow become harmonic to mine. Mv common ear is so untuned to 
Beethoven that listening to his music is like listening to a stampede of horses. All 
instruments sound alike, and evervthing runs into everything else— nothing is distinct. 
Music appreciation is really not something I appreciate, because it disrupts the train 
of thought of my ears. 

Frankie Leoff '68 
20 





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Splitting 

Plodding, pounding, plowing the furrows of my brain 

caught between basic minds 

unable to abstract to understand 

and expound for the greater self 

to discover trust 

to love enough, if even in molecular form, to live . . . 

Desperate median. 

Nothing left but a frustrated greater desire to live 

no time, too slow, defeat; then the death prayer. 

Briared threading branches pierce the eye 

vines clamber over a dried disintegrating skull 

a scream echoing within chambers of sun-bleached bones. 

Silhouetted blue on white 

a shadow rises and quivers across heated unprinted sands 

Wind-blown dust claims the steps 

Crippled knarled fingers scratch and rip at the temple walls 

the shrine, lacking foundations, tumbles inward 

the shadow the crippled bird 

perching awkwardly on a blade of grass 

transforms to black raven 

and casts his shadow far under the lowering sun. 

To be the pilot of sunsets, to be the 
fearless 'til dawn that is to save 
the half-person, that is an answer to survival 
not yet attained. 

Elizabeth Bullock '68 



23 




:lj .*' 



The Sound 

the sound 

the windv sound no echoes bring 

puffs about the steel towers 

in gleaming sun 

in sequential rains 

huddles in streetside splotches such 

searing pains 

the sound 

the voices that a prophet cries 

drip his life down subway halls 

stop for coffeecake 

on midtown erosstown uptown trains 

newssheets squat in every seat 

the sound 

of seeping liver oil and opened tongues 

to taste the might of pounding echoes 

the people called the masses here 

thighs beat roundabout and come to hear 

the flesh thev swabbed and laughed about 

bent over tense honed . . . 

with racks of echoes laughing clear 

as the transients know that fool and whore 

ruptured so loved and swore 

the sound 

someone left the cross and padded off 

into shantv towns and wrought iron gates 

sipped more mash and scuttled fate 

and the echoes that never were 

that all surelv bled and died for 

the sound 

the windv sound no echoes bring 

scrawled in tenement cracks and other things 

sleeps beneath white winter's pinafore 



Kim Kirchmaier '68 



24 



Transiency 

The sun shone upon the earth 

and the world was filled with glory 
A man died— 

and brought sorrow into joy 
the world cried— 

Two days later— 
The sun shone upon the earth 

and filled the earth with glory. 

Cindy Brox '69 



The Choice 

The choice is between 

The famed and the forgotten 

But both died for God. 

Kim Kirchmaier '68 



A Lifetime 

When the blistering rays 
Of the sun beat down 
There seems no end in sight. 

Suddenly the wind picks up 
With a menacing pace 
Thunder rumbles, Lightning strikes, 
And Hell breaks loose. 

The wind slowly dies 
To a contented purr, 
And all commotion ceases. 

Holly Holihan '69 



25 



The Beauty of the Earth 

Snowflakes shiver through the wind, 
Fire melts in the woods of the timber. 
Happily the snowflake drifts; 

Agiley the flames crackle and jump! 

The soft, furry lamb, 
The quivering grass, 

The rough, asphalt road, 
The smooth, squeaky glass. 

The intoxicating sun, 
The fury of the wind, 
The scintillating stars, 
The provocative fruit. 

The poised Cala Lily, 

The immense pow'r of the ant. 
The jovial little bees, 

The beasts below the turf. 

Too many flies pestering the sky, 

Too many windmills over the entrance of a store. 
Lots of laughs from the theatre near, 
Lots of laughs from the children I hear. 

Water rushing over the stepping stones of life- 
One must experience all to get to the other side. 

Guitars playing, wise men saying, 
Angels hov'ring, shepherds praying. 

Three beautiful gifts— not of God, but of love. 
One flowing river, one tender pure dove. 

Twinkle, twinkle little star, 

Now I know just where you are; 

Up with the happy people and their mirth, 
Admiring the beauty of the Earth. 




Georgia Innes '68 



26 



Haiku 



"Equality" I 

spoke the word as if a vow 

but I was young then 



Kim Kirchmaier '68 



Never say I have 
not loved . . . 

The infatuation 
had its rainbow. 



Lynne Tatian '69 



The world, 

just as an overhead storm, 

symbolizes 

the confusion. 




Charlotte Brohard '68 



The starfish 
desperately clings 
to the wavering mass 
of seaweed. 



Fay Sutton '68 



27 



Levels of Poverty 



I! 

11 



Blessed are those . 



drained of emotion 

lameness preventing forlorn worldly potential 

lacking confidence and contentness 

from stumbling sacrifice of native elements 

causing crippling convulsions. 

" Tis a pity for those creatures with nothing . . ." 
sounds the distant sympathetic whispered response 

from those 'with all', 
tuned from without. 
Interlocked is their 
shattered jewel of soft 
aging, gold interior. 



Embraced in intimate yesterdays: 

their searching eyes 

intensively dissolve into 

the brown, blinding, intimidating glow 

of the eagle's . . . 

now entangled in a valley of fear. 

This independent alien watches, 

caring scarcely 

recognizing so extensively 

the pattern of the narrowly pleated 

cycle of those heroines of lameness 

wallowing in dusty sterility 

degenerating into mortal dirt. 



Ill 

He sees 

the loathed cheapness 

seeking its nauseating miracle 

in its own crucified contentness 

in exercise of labored sweetness; 

jailing disreputable walls of custom 

lingering in justifiable hecticness 

provoking 

sightless faith in vanity 

which humanity 

refuses to reconcile— vet 

continues to encourage . . . 

Is this division between souls . . .? 
Loyalist beat not your prudent cause! 
Sacrifice your concentration of experience, 
But let it not cause privation of unity of soul! 

The savior of the echoing cathedral 

of man's tormented mind 

is his showering pleasantries, 

for the worst eventuallv returns to laughter . . 

Maybe the impoverished live 
so the worst can laugh . . . 



Man must be his own counselor 

of 



light 



Lisa Strasburg '69 



28 



Aftermath of War 

A breeze carrying the smell of death through . . . 

A dark forest. 

Roots of trees cling into swamp. 

Trees made of boxes, squares . . . What lies in them . . . trees 

poisoned with time, marked for death . . . 

Birds fly; nothing walks the earth; vet the hand of man 

is visible, is visible, is visible . . . echoes of yesterday. 

How far the echo goes . . . 

Even in death man seems never to end. 

Laura Lockwood '68 




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Nature Did Never Betray 

Nourishing, flooding shafts of sun 

burn into the desolate shady trail 

monopolizing with the wind 

the thickly binding growth 

of vast damp gripping forest. 

Smothering sweetness of mellow dew . . 

magnifying brilliantly 

climbing into a candlelit crystle ecstasy . 

Oh sacred land of purity . . . 

Provided sanity! 

Nature's womb of creation! 

Aborted into existence 

theTe is a constant melody 

of intense squalor . . . and 

Commitments causing deprivation 

to soul's grasp of self . . . 

Ah . . . but here not . . . 

not where 

soul can render to identity 

deep in the wells of screaming silence . 

Not where longed relief 

of counterfeit pain replenishes . . . 

persuading loyalty to divine senses . . . 



Lisa Strasburg '69 



31 



Cucumber Road 

Exit 3 off "Hobbits" Road 

Sibyl and Sebastian three mushrooms tolled 

Enter ye to the pike 

The eternal Cucumber Road 

Baring their feet, they gaze awe-stricken 

The jaded juicy jewel before them lies 
Slip Slip 

Slop Slop 

Squish Squish 

Squash Squash 

Memories of soggy sneakers 

They slig slog on down the road 

An elusive elephant— slivers he by . . . 

"Salt not the green," bade he. 

On still trudge the two 
Destiny— a green velvet land 
Lost now, no word carried . . . 
Never land can be found. 

Kate DeBlois '68 



■ 




32 



How We Broke in the New House 




I don't know why we had to move to this 
stupid old house. It didn't even have a sandbox 
or swing set in the back vard like at our other 
place. And it wasn't even finished. The kitchen 
stunk like brand new varnish, and wood shavings 
made little curlicues all over the floor. The T.V. 
hadn't been hooked up yet and there was no 
good stuff in the refrigerator. 

The little girl next door was a real creep. 
On the first day I barged into her house to see 
if she wanted to go climb the big apple tree in 
the back yard. But no, she wanted to sit in the 
house and plav little sissy games with her dolls 
and have tea parties. Why couldn't we have 
staved at our other house? There we didn't have to worry about where we stampeded 
with our friends, where we put our grubby, dirt-covered hands or any of those other 
things that bug us in this lah-di-dah joint. And at our old house there was lots of 
junk to do. But what was there to do in this brand new, stinky house? There was 
nothing— until— one day mv brother and I thought up a new game. 

There was an open stairway in our new house, unlike the one in our other house 
which had walls on both sides. What fun we had sitting at the top of the carpeted 
stairway and sliding down on our seats. By the time we reached the bottom we were 
a little hotsy-totsy in the pants, but who cared! Mom got sore when Mike wore a hole 
right through his trousers so we decided we'd try something else. Now, who could 
jump down the most stairs? Mike thought he could and I thought I could and we 
were both eager to outdo one another. I jumped down two; he jumped three. I 
bounded into mid-air from the fourth; he pounced to the floor from the fifth. I 
reached the point where I could stand his "hee-hee's, ha-ha's" no longer and stumbled 
to the top of the staircase. Sweat poured down my face in my anger. He wasn't going 
to outdo me this time, the little smarty-pants. I leaped. 

Mike and I decided to give this game up. Now there was absolutely nothing to 
do in this spiffy new house. But I guess you can't do much with a broken leg, anyway. 



Cynthia Tomsu '68 



A sad feeling 

Why? 

A lost feeling 

Ami? 

Jennifer Foster '69 



33 



Mirage 

It was midnight. I was restless and couldn't sleep, so I lit a forbidden cigarette 
and started pacing the floor. The moon shone brightly through the window of my 
cramped room. I took out one of my old compositions, which always seemed to make 
me fall asleep, but even it had no effect. Suddenly, on impulse, I had to get outside, 
to feel the cool night air through my hair, to touch the grass, to get outside and be 
free from my invisible prison. 

I slowly opened my bedroom door and quietly crept down the carpet-covered 
staircase. I went outside and began to run wildlv through the grass. The dew made my 
feet very wet and I slipped and fell. The shock threw me into a kind of panic. I quickly 
rose and began to run again. Mv parents had probably noticed my absence by now. 
My parents! How silly they were to have taken me in. I wanted my real parents. I 
wanted to return to those happy davs on the farm— the simple, carefree days before 
the accident. But they were gone and they would never come back again. I can't erase 
that fatal accident from my mind. My parents! The fools! They knew just as well as 
I did that I didn't belong in their high-class society, their fancy house and clothes. I 
didn't belong and never would. 

Suddenly, I slipped again and this time hit mv head on a rock. I felt the cool 
wetness of the dew on my forehead. I got up though and began to run again as fast 
as I could, in no particular direction. If people had seen me, they would have thought 
me mad, but I didn't care. 

In the distance I could see the country road leading to the farm, and I saw my 
father waiting for me. My father— to me he was like an immortal god. A powerful 
giant. 

My head began to ache, but I kept running. I would be late for supper and 
I knew my father would be angry. I hoped not. I would probably have to go to bed 
with no supper, but what did it matter as long as I could be with my father. 

I can see him there on the front porch of our farmhouse waiting for me. He 
looks mad. But when I run into his arms, nothing will matter— nothing will ever 



matter again. 



Susan Antonopoulos 71 

Lament 

My love and I have built a wall 
Between us— so thick and wide 
Each stone of it is laid in scorn 
And piled high with foolish pride. 

Each day I try to climb the wall 
And look to the other side 
Then I gaze at him so small 
And I know my love has died. 

Lynne Tatian '69 



34 




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Dazed City 

Darkened mist 

scattered with buildings, 

edifices towering in whitish-veil ow haze 

disappear into nothingness. 

Tinv beads of dew 
form droplets of rain 
clinging to the shadows 
saturating the air. 

Fay Sutton '68 



35 



Elegy of Comparison 

Oh, do compare the black and the white 

As rain is wrong and sun is right. 

And do compare the voung and the old 

As vouth is warm and age is cold. 

Go on, spare your pitv for the weak and the poor 

As you spare vour diamonds and then ask for more. 

Compare! Compare! Show vou know the difference! 
Separate all with your narrow-minded fence. 
Show all the world how your great eyes discriminate, 
For only you can see whom to love, whom to hate. 

You have a backbone of money, you're part of the state, 
But you're deaf and can't hear the bell ringing your fate, 
Tolling the death of inequality and your soul. 
It's saying you're dead, little man, hear it toll? 



EPITAPH 

"Here lies a man, an omnipotent fool, 
Who compared the whole world with his cancerous rule, 
That "all men aren't equal, only my kind must live!" 
And "If you are gifted, take more and don't give." 
This man full of prejudice thought he was sage. 
Pity he died at such a very young age." 

Georgia Innes '68 



36 




Shades of Gray 

imaginary blinds 

shading out impulsive thrust for knowledge 

mind and eye 

letting only shades of light 

and dark 

flood in . . . 
not blinding reds 
of unbearable impression . . . 

letting in only high sweet tones of the flute 
not the thick untuned orchestra . . . 
bitter tasting are lilies 

growing in a flock 

Lisa Strasburg '69 



37 



Morning Memory 

Each morning she rose and watched the first beams of light hit the farmhouse 
where she had grown up. The mist of the early morning enveloped her in reminiscence 
of the past. Dew slowly trickled down each blade of withering grass, each one like a 
wasted year. The pond in front of the farmhouse was a glass mirror reflecting her 
aged face. In the stillness of these early mornings she would stop and dream that 
once more she was young with a full lifetime ahead of her. 

Carol Gadd '69 




38 



"I Think I'll Paint The Sky Today" 

I think I'll paint the sky today, 
A color for every state. 
California's will be blue and gold, 
Another's black as slate. 

Over each hilltop, over each vale, 

A different colored light. 

The stars' twinkling green, blue and red 

Will make the nights so bright. 

I'll take a decorated Christmas tree, 
And add pale colors too. 
I'll pour the paints both near and far 
And add a flash or two. 

The moon will glow with tender green. 
A sunset like that you've never seen! 
Some colorful clouds will go floating by, 
A painted special for every eve. 

But no, I know it cannot be. 
There can't be painting in the sky, 
For it would all fall down on me . . . 
But wouldn't it be fun to try? 



Georgia Innes '68 



The Act 

A grin at grandma and her fossil companions. 

Now for some tears to dissolve Daddy's decisions. 

How about a wrinkle of the nose to portray 

your impatience over a boring topic 

or a smirk of assurance worn in the security 

of vour ability to plav with people's emotions? 

Now the wide-eyed innocence of a naughty but nice child 

or the upward tilt of the pug nose symbolizing sophistication. 

The mirror reflects the actor. 

Jodi Landwehr '68 



39 



Lines and Colors 

Lines 

Drawn on paper 

To show simplicity of life. 

Colors 

Painted on paper 

To show shades of life. 

Lindsay Bacon '68 



Before Dawn 

Greenish-blue night 
Wrinkled with orange candles 
Squeezed between a jaundice-colored moon 
Swishing gray sweeps traverse the lonely sky 
While bluish-purple mountains reach to join . . . 
Below, the darkened village awaits the attack of dav 
And, a lonelv sentry, a great black figure, 
Guards the people at rest. 

Amy Wilson '68 



The Assignment 

Here, plastered on smudgev, fingerprinted walls, are prints decoratively hung. 
Hours more I could spend looking at each copied painting. Somewhere beside the 
real painting stands the hazy ghost of the artist with paint under his nails, yet I feel 
his presence also here with me. Each print becomes a world to me and I feel I've been 
in some of these scenes before. I concentrate on the flat surface which tempts me with 
an enormous variety of sensual pleasures. Mv fingers unravel and stretch to caress 
the green. If only these figures would say some way— "yes, come"— I would. But these 
prints tease me and I cannot begin to write for such a thing— a writing from these 
prints feels limiting . . . 

Elizabeth Bullock '68 



40 







\ 










A Storm 

A storm 

I find myself raging in circles 
to find what-no end-lost? 
My legs tremble when I stop to think- 
Before I could feel nothing— now 
I'm scared. 

Looking up— the trees above sway- 
Lightning, a spark, and all is destroyed 
Me— what am I worth— 
What chance have I against what? 
Whv all this— what have I done? 
I run— to hide between two rocks— 
The wind is broken but the cold rain 
continues— 
Exhausted— I sleep— 
For how long— forever? 

Laura Lockwood '68 




Transition 

The trees arch over in the wind. The waves curl over one another and are as 
tall as a house. The screech of the desolate bird tells that the storm hovers about. 
Clouds come sweeping in with the increase of the wind. The sea crashes, sounds, 
throbs against the pulverized shore. And then, then the calm. A ray of sun jets out 
from behind a cloud like a spear from heaven and pierces the dead bird. 

Sherrill Warner '68 
42 



Sanctuary 

An old woman strode in slow, solemn 
steps up to the narrow entrance of a large, care- 
lessly-built, thatched roof and walled hut. Push- 
ing the mat curtain aside, she moved cautiously 
into the room. The enclosure had an unnatural 
air about it. The frozen earth floor crunched 
beneath her bare tortured feet. Outside, the un- 
bearable cold and blizzardy wind had been hard 
on her thinly-clad bodv. And now, now the sud- 
den warmth— her numb inner-self tingled. 

Clasping her weather-beaten hands, the 
old woman knelt on a small cushion. There she 
crouched for a long while, partially letting the 
hunger groans of the poor and helpless, who 
made a corner of the shelter their home, direct her thoughts. The sparsely-padded, 
thatched roof and walls of the hut swayed in the wind. The only light of the room 
was a lone flickering candle; the only marks of comfort were the torn kneeling 
cushions scattered here and there. The pungent odor of huddled bodies went 
unnoticed. 

On a mantel at the end of the room stood a small, chipped, clay statue of 
Jesus. The old woman's volcanic eyes now focused on the quaint piece of sculpture 
which seemed to her of great beauty. Painfully she lifted her scrawny body, moved 
forward to the mantel, and stretched upward, her head flung backward almost 
detached from her bonev shoulders, her black matted hair fallen to its full length. 
Her small, shaking fingers ran slowly down the figure, immune to the decree "No 
Handling." She murmured brokenlv. Then, turning to the door and fumbling with 
her nagged cloak, she staggered out into the cold, her ravished soul, comforted . . . 




Lisa Strasburg '69 



Haiku 



Self-pity is 
an explosive disease 
which shatters 
one's dark innards. 



Man must find 
inner faith 
before he asks others 
to believe in him. 



Jodi Landwehr '68 



43 









Today 

So many women- 
clumped together- 
chattering— gossiping 
about nothing? 



So many men- 
loud— raucous 

laughing— talking 
about nothing? 









\\ ] 



Little children- 
creating— 

building castles 
with spires- 
reaching up— 
to nothing? 









Soldiers 

shots of life 
being expelled 

from the hope of return 
ending in nothing . . . 

the world 

always turning— 
a cycle— unending 
repetitious 
really living? 



[i 

/ 'V 






Alida McIlvain '69 



44 



Analogy 

Feelings clash, 

like a cold, stinging drop of snow 

that meets a cup of hot, freshly-boiled water. 

Only this time the feelings do not combine 

or melt to find a warm and mild mixture, 

or a oneness that can live in harmony. 

Feelings clash 

corrode 

as when silver is dipped in acid. 

Place Downey '68 



Between 

Drifting through the 

White sheets of sleep 

Visions come to me 

Of misty fields, pale skies 

Of scorching rivers and 

Firey trees 

All beckoning, pulling at 

My brain. 

A whirlpool of confusion 

Calling and tempting 

With lollipops and 

Promises . . . 

Until the mind's cord is cut. 

Dania Doremus '69 



Connotation 

Leadership is stronger without 
a title. For those who are 
trulv heroes are naturally so. 

Without the title is without 
public position . . . governing the 
mass. 

But you are you 

which far surpasses both . . . 

Lisa Strasburc '69 



45 



Wintered Youth 

Somewhere from a cold, dark cave of winter emerged a sad-eyed youth. Dis- 
tantly, in a jungle, he cried out lost mournful songs on his high pitched flute. His 
rigid, emaciated body carried him with faltering steps before summer's gilded altar. 
His eyes were shadowed with tortured introspection. 

Oh, star, his tribe saw in his flame obscurity, vet they were his flickering 
figures. 

He had awakened on this new morning with blood-stained eyes. He had heard 
diseased syllables disgorged over disconnected tongues through pleasant half-smiles. 
He had seen people carelessly erect and destroy. He had watched generals, armored 
in costumes of medals, standing with one polished boot on the casket of a million 
dusty, unlived individuals. Molds were produced and the world's faces were being 
cast into a single expression. Stiff-legged children uniformly marched, grasping 
wooden guns in preparation for world destruction. Thev lived and died in single file. 
Their cunning, self-devised weapons severed heads, and their clenched fists drove 
mutilating spikes into others. A war existed behind all men's backs and few had the 
courage to turn and recognize the blood they had let. 

Prowling, starving youth ... cat in the jungle . . . the city . . . run roach, cat 
rat . . . 

People discriminate with confining codes . . . Thev, the evil, naive . . . 

Public statements suggesting nothing . . . 

Neurotic infantile minds erected as halo heads . . . 

The youth divorced from life fell to his knees below the brilliant summer's 
sun; his weakened body heaved under gasping sobs. 

He rose, bending and swaying in the wind. On a September night the 
wintered youth, reborn, strode far back into the brush. Rippling songs from his flute 
twined throughout the jungle. 

A new set of seasons made their turn and the high sun watched, but the boy 
did not reappear; he was a wintered youth. 

Elizabeth Bullock '68 



46 






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Message 

Written in ink, in German, in a hopelessly sincere handwriting, were the 
words "Dear God, life is hell." . . . "Fathers and teachers," I ponder, "what is hell?" I 



maintain that it is the suffering of being unable to love." 



Kim Kirchmaier '68 



Parting . . . 

No reason 

Just leaving 

Walking out on life 

Others are left 

to suffer 

for what 

You have done. 



Ending 

Slowly the heart is crushed 

for want of understanding. 

Did it have to be? 

Why must some 

suffer 

for one? 

Afterward 

The deed is done 

The moment was intolerable 

But the memories return 

the good 

the sweet 

the love 
And now the sorrow eternal 
because 
of you. 



Torment 

Monstrous mountains of inevitable crashes 
and smashes of symbols 
together with ashes of 
flesh from their lashes 
of whips and of tears . . . 

But how does one know 

when to escape from the blow 

of the stark bitter taste 

declining lower than low 

when all that can go 

is brought to a stop 

but the slow still continue to run . . . 

Aluda McIlvain '69 



Kathy Winter '68 



48 



Closer For The Kill 

The cat crept along the ground ready for the kill. Its long curving tail twitched 
from time to time while its body humped gracefully to make a distinctive bridge of 
fur. The legs were stiff, waiting to lunge forward. Its ears were perked for the 
slightest sound and its eyes pierced the innocent victim. 

The victim's rigid gray tail was flattened and its red breast was plumped from 
a recent meal of rich earthworms. One wing was so pressed against the body that no 
outline could be distinguished. The other wing, broken, lay outstretched and limp. 
The eyes were agonized with pain. 

Aware only of the hunger pains in its arched belly, the cat slowly made its 
way closer for the kill. 

Betsey Summon 70 




49 



Afternoon in the Field 

The man walks slowly through the corn field, one hand clutching the twelve 
gauge Browning, the other in the left hand pocket of his brown tweed hunting jacket. 
He spots his game, a brilliantly colored, young pheasant. He moves in its direction, 
but the bird spots him and remains completely still hoping the hunter will pass by. 
Sensing that he has been seen, the pheasant begins to scamper through the dried 
stalks. The hunter, knowing he cannot shoot until the bird is in the air, picks up a 
pebble and throws it. The pheasant leaps into the air. 

"This is mv chance," the hunter thinks to himself, as he brings the gun up to 
his shoulder and his other hand up to hold it firm. Quickly lining the sight with the 
pheasant, he pulls his finger back on the trigger. The shot rings out. It is perfect, 
leaving feathers in the sky to float down slowly and the pheasant to take a tremendous 
fall to the ground. The hunter picks up his prize and walks slowly away in the late 
afternoon sun. 

Elizabeth Laing 70 



The Genius and the Imbecile 

The genius and the imbecile 

As each so deftly sauntered through 

The maze of fumes, departures, times 

Red busy humans idle planes 

Each stopped and uttered voiceless sound 

Of Hello— Whyfore art thou here? 

A fluent discourse launched upon 

Said genius, "Embarkation hour 

Approaches." Onward, imbecile 

Retreated both a separate way. 

Kim Kirchmaier '68 



50 



An Image 

The mass blue-green 

Like the rising and falling 

of a majestic bird's wing. 

Bits of waste lie on top 

To be absorbed 

then tossed to 

the entire eternity of the sea. 

How is one to know 
What has been achieved 

By this mighty magnitude of unperceived depth? 
Like a great whale, 
Rolling and thundering, 
always churning, 

The tides slapping the deserted shore— 
A whole world- 
beautiful to hear and see 
But not to be. 

Alida McIlvain '69 




Old Egg Shells 

Through the alleys of my utmost experiences a cat jumped over a heap of 
God-knows-what and it fell to the cobblestone ground and broke. And as I Went to 
pick the pieces up, it slipped from my aid ... I looked again; it was dust. I couldn't 
remember what I had lost. It was only a facet (and not a gem) so I walked away 
and went about my pie-making. The next time I heard a crash on the floor of my 
mind, I could not find its killer. A lame shadow warned me that I was the only killer 
and that I must watch my pies, for if a merchant came to my shop and asked how 
many pies I had fresh— I would again lose for I would be busy with the past . . . the 
scrambling of what is gone. 

Raleigh Perkins 71 



51 



An Inflection 



What goes on in those haunted minds 
covered by flesh and childish eyes 
where deep down inside 
in the depths of the spirit 
they hungrily reach for more? 

Do they not have enough 

of this inedible trash? 

What right do they have 

to live amongst others 

who are swayed so easily 

by their disillusioning pain 

of sin and corruption? 

How many times must they reach for nothing 

before they realize the nothing is nothing 

but an easy road to destruction? 

Is there no help for those poor, poor souls 

who cannot help themselves— 

Is there no light which they might see 

to steer them away 

before it's too late 

and their minds are doomed? 

Each one alone 

searching — searching 

and only leading 

more and more 

to a mystical, magical, crumbling end 

of depression and hunger for more . . . 

Above the shroud that blinds their vision 
a rav pushes through the bleak, filtered cloud- 
pushes down with a knob on the end 
which only one can grasp before being drowned 
in the endless desert of the unsuccessful 
into which thev have driven. 

Maybe one will survive 
for the others are blind 
and carefree and reckless 
but the one . . . that one . . . 
will ascend the steep stairway 
of rotten aged steps without a railing 
into the untouched universe 
and the past will dissolve- 
like a shattered memory and float from the present 
weighted down with the worn 
in the wind. 




lajuniePt 



Alida McIlvain '69 



52 



The Interruption 

I confidently marveled at the balance and agileness of my movements as I 
picked my way over the rockv shore. Mv youthful free days were spent here and I 
was completely tuned to all of nature. Now I had come to reclaim my home. The 
air enhanced by salt and earth, all the elements I knew, it was all coming back. But 
I was not looking for reversion, only to discover missing steps, the point where I had 
turned. 

Afternoon shadows were erased as my head turned from the light. The shore- 
line dipped into the embankment. The current pulsed into the bend. A steady slop 
of translucent grev waves cart-wheeled over rocks which seemed to turn soft at their 
bases. I drew near the odd form below the rocks. Fearful curiosity kept me distant. 
Picking up a stone I steadied my footing and accurately tossed the stone at the white 
resilience. Soundlessly, the stone hit and bounced into the water. I stood tensely 
straining in disbelief. I knew what this was. The white mass trailed out into scarf- 
like sheenness that seeminglv blew in a gusty wind as the water sucked it back into 
the sea and then sent it rippling again to slide and drape over its incarcerating rocks. 
It had to be a shark, a stingray, some dead fish. But it was none of these. It was 
difficult to tell just where in all the blubber the bones so slightly protruded. Only 
around the bones was there any shading of color, milkv gray. I gazed incredulously at 
its softness being tugged and thrown about by the sea. There was no head nor much 
of the usual resemblance. 

Who had it been? Why was it here? It was gone from somewhere. Was it 
missed or remembered— and for what? 

There was no blood, that too was gone. Others would vomit. Did I want to, 

I wondered. No. 

I rigidly jostled down the beach to see if there was more evidence. There was 
none and it was now dark. 

Home in my bedroom I cranked open the window. The room vibrated with a 
shrieking sound which I did not make out to be wind. The muffled mourning clang 
of the bell buoy and the whistler buoy's lost hollow song drifted in out of the fog 
and held me stone-like on my bed the whole night. The fearful superstition and the 
rational contemplation of the irrational saw me wakefully through the night. At dawn 
I discovered my land had as always turned back into the light. 

Elizabeth Bullock '68 

Impression of Hell 

An empty vacuum 
A nullity of space 
The perpetual walk 
Of intolerable pace 
Nothing of pride 
Nothing of shame 
Nothing to lose 
Yet nothing to gain 
Neither fears nor hopes 
Neither love nor hate 
For nothing but the end 
Of infinity to wait. 

Donna Brion '68 
53 



Riding Lesson 

I rode noiselessly along the well-trodden trail. The woods seemed to be covered 
with a silent, pellucid veil. Although I enjoy people, crowds, and the lively, the 
strange intonations of woodland life, the taciturnity of the forest were much appreci- 
ated. My horse, too, felt the need for peace, and he moved lightly and silently. 

The almost unbearable inaudibility was broken as a small bird cried a warn- 
ing to his comrades to be aware of an oncoming danger. My trance was immediately 
broken as reality struck me. That small bird, as free as he was, faced problems 
synonomous to those which confront the human race. His war was a fight to survive, 
yet he only worried about himself. I wondered if this was not true of a person. Would 
I leave my home and endanger my life for an unknown; 3 Would anybody, willingly) 

My horse didn't allow me to reach a conclusion as he struck up a strong trot 
across an open field. We hopped over a small brush, and I found myself sitting low 
in the saddle as my mount galloped along, robust and powerful beneath me. We were 
approaching a solid, four-foot stone wall. Steadily we neared it, wanton and 
unvanquished. My big gelding's stride never faltered, and he eagerly sought another 
obstacle to conquer. This unharnessed freedom was almost too much to comprehend. 
Why did it not last forever? 

Frankie Leoff '68 



Mistaken 



If the times we had 
don't mean as much 
as rain 
upon your nose, 

If they fail to bring 
a warmth to you, 
a warmth 
that grows and grows, 



I was wrong I guess 
to think that you 
might end 
my fears and woes . . . 

I was wrong to think 
that love, like soup, 
is felt 
down to your toes. 

Debbie Jones '68 



54 



April 

This day in April 
one lone jellyfish 
pushed its warm 
tenacles through 
misty air. 
Hot gold pulled 
green rich food from 
battered soil . . . 
and grew towards 
the stinging mouth. 
Silver water stared 
up at a blinking 
sky which smiled 
gleefully as it was 
reflected. 
Azure fields held 
lovely folded fawns 
who pranced freely 
to a bee-zy drone 
melody. 

Grasshoppers leaped 
through 

the daisies. 
This day in April. 

Kim Kirchmaier '68 




55 



Trigger for Surrender 

Ragged body 

treacherously pounded 

by overpoweringly 

sensitive linkings 

for salvation 

In sightless dreams . . . 

walk not in currents 

of drowning dry oceans 

spending forever 

in cunning tideless priceless webbs of moments! 

Touch heaven's height of reflections— 

that peculiarly abstract 

glowing luminous sheet 

of brilliant radiance. 

Listen long with your hazy mellow eyes! 

to the forbidden truths of the lonely serpent! 

Hold now! serene and proud . . . 

while dwelling in the chariot of reticence . . . 

and let not your languish corrode the dying mirage. 

Lisa Strasburg '69 



On Rejections 

I look into a mirror. 
I see me! Wait a minute! 
That is not me. I fee! 
miserable and depressed, 
and this reflection looks 
happy and smiling . . . 
Could I be just putting 
up a front? Maybe I had 
better keep it up so that 
no one will question me in 
my despair. It might be 
easier if I smile from the 
inside too. 
Now I am a real person. 

Truda Bloom '69 
56 




Which Way? 



With the twinkling rhinestones 
that the sun makes with the 
street lamps that line 
our hidden wavs, 
our lives become unreal. 

Our fingertips touch plastic, not soil. 

We breathe smoke, not air. 

We speak hate and war, but we think love and peace. 

Which is it to be? Our hearts or our minds? 
Which way will our false roads lead us? 

Until the sun rises one more shine, 

Until I smell a flower one more time, 

Until the books and nature are once combined, 

People will be killers and people will be kind. 

So, as for me, 1 will follow the tendencies of mv heart, 
But the direction of mv mind. 

Georgia Innes '68 



57 



Savior Peace 

As the sun sank slowly beneath the horizon, it reflected in a brilliant gold 
on the rippled water. I felt so small as I gazed upon the vastness of the sea. There 
was a solitude and the only sound was that of the waves washing the shore. I was 
quite alone. 

As I lav on the sand letting the grains pass through my fingers I watched the 
darkness creep over me. It was peaceful, vet that afternoon the beach had swarmed 
with hot sticky bodies and a continual rumble of voices and childish screams pre- 
vailed. 

The sun had finallv set and in the darkness no edifice nor man-made structure 
remained visible. The stars shone brightly within the endlessness of space, and the 
moon, like an immense electrical sphere, was suspended in the vast nothingness of 
night. Within this solitude there was a subtle peace and my thoughts strayed from 
destruction. 

Donna Brion '68 







58 



Cat's Sight 



The cats lay still. 

Swinging pendulums on skeleton sill, 
Dust flying, cats crying- 
Mew for milk, and catch a mouse. 

Unexpectedly purring, slant eyes blurring, 

Memory returning of forgotten years of man. 

Man, a creature with misused power, didn't understand. 

He built a complex tower and watched dog eat dog, oh 

Time-worshippers! Nodding yes and doing no. 



And the time of man raged on and on, 

But there was an end; 

An end achieved by those who 

wanted to extend, 

Progress, defy, explore! 

And even then, 

They wanted more. 

But even while his work decayed 
Without a tear, the world lived on, 
And yet his sigh and suffering stayed 
To urge the lesser creatures on 
To heed Man's efforts and recall 
His wills, his goals, and achievements 
Of highest accord. 
The vastness of his knowledge 
Could not be restored. 

Thev remembered monuments, 

Tall buildings, forests, train tracks, 

And shiny shells that went so fast, 

And hammers, hollows, and paper stacks. 

They remembered the commonfolk 

Like their masters, and how they'd poke 

Around and soften feathered furrows of fur, 

And scratch their necks and disappear 

To tap away at a forgotten chapter 

Of a forgotten work, 

And then discard it to be burnt. 



For what reason, wondered the cats, did they, 

Who were so mighty, fall as if off a cliff 

To permanentlv cut off the bud 

And grow green dreams about the moon 

Where they could spread their foul disease, 

And watch it multiply 'til soon 

Another planet's overgrown 

With feeble minds still frail but free, 

Forgetting what they set out to be? 

The animals and all lesser things 
Watched silently their exhausting means 
Of digging, developing, devouring seas, 
And inventing years and entities— 
A youthful ever; yet how they failed 
To learn from all the books they started 
Caring no more for histories. 

Year after year, and after they strove 
And fought; rose and fell and straggled along. 
They took no note of their fathers' words 
Which their grandfathers told and fathers broke 
Now son would break and yet pass on. 

Too bad they would not compromise. 
Too bad thev could not see their lies. 
And now sleep closes soft slant eves; 
Freedom— no more people's rule . . . 



For the cats weren't cruel . . 



Georgia Innes '68 



59 



The View 

Across the sun-glazed meadow, I saw you. You stood tall and solid like an 
oak, one that catches wind and throws it into my soul, to give life and replenish what 
has left with dusk. I saw the ripe grain grow and felt it swish against mv leg. I saw 
the mid-day sun that gave us grace and you a smile. I saw the long, long hill down 
which I used to run; or fall. In all, I saw you. And now, I look across my mind and 
realize, what is gone. Let us not, like ripe grain, sit and wait for the mill. 

Raleigh Perkins 71 




Creek 

Continuous path . . . 
icy lucidness 

smooth reflections 

and a leaf 
carried nowhere 

Toni Pollak '69 



60 



Believe it or not . . . 

Rogers Hal], I will miss you. 

Bill and Manuel's good mornings. 

The anxiety of mail after lunch. 

Demerits? 

Running barefoot through the wet grass 

After dinner . . . alone. 

The coral velvet over Moody School at sunset 

The outline of a black tree against a misty, 

Grey sky . . . my tree. 

Friends . . . one friend . . . favorite undergrads. 

The rush to classes. 

Learning to like ... to live with certainties, 

But Rogers Hall I will not miss the 

Lessons of life you have taught me. 

They will never leave me as I . . . 

Will soon . . . 

Leave you. 




Martha Parkinson '68 



61 



SPLINTERS 



NORTHEAST OFFSET Inc. 







260 BILLERICA ROAD - ROUTE 129 

CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 01824 

Telephone 454-7791 Area Code 617 



62 



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Compliments of 



CONANT'S GROCERY 



63 



SPLINTERS 



D 



omwSU 



jantzen. 

Sporty -i 





<&* 




COCA-COLA CO. 



Lowell, Mass. 



BLANCHARD CHARTERED SERVICE, INC. 

owned and operated bv 
ALVIN T. FRENCH 

Tewksbury 



64 



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PAINT £. WALLPAPER 



40 I erry Oireei Lowell, r\assac huseM: 

Telephone Area code 617 459-9862 



Buckland Printing Co. 

Lowell, Mass. 



Blended Chignons 
by 

CXwc..o»iowta/ 



45 Merrimack Street 



Tel. 458-6331 



65 



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'100 Years of Quality and Service" 

PRINCE'S 

Stationers - Booksellers - Gifts 
Typewriters - Greeting Cards 



96-104-108 MERRIMACK ST. 



LOWELL, MASS. 




SPANISH CLUB '68 







Compliments of 


Compliments of 




POST OFFICE 


BELVIDERE WINE CO., 


INC. 


LOCKSMITH 

A. M. JEKNAVORIAN 


Compliments of 




Compliments of 


EASTERN SERVICE 


CO. 


THE SCOTT JEWELRY CO. 


Frigidtre Salts & Strvice 




60 Merrimack St. 
corner of Central St. 


238 Shaw St. LOWELL, 


MASS. 


LOWELL, MASS. 


(Phone GL 3-3979) 







66 



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SHERATON 



ROLLING GREEN MOTOR INN 



• GIFT SHOP 

• 100 BEAUTIFUL GUEST ROOMS 

• INDOOR AND OUTDOOR POOLS 

• COFFEE SHOP 

• COCKTAIL LOUNGE 



JCT. 133 and 93, ANDOVER 



TEL. 475-5400 



67 



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ALBERT RICHARDS CO., Inc 



J 




SOLD AT 

McKlTTRICK HARDWARE CO. 

Plumbing, Heating, Farm Supplies 
60 Fletcher Street LOWELL, MASS. 



HIGHLAND LAUNDRY-SUNSHINE CLEANERS 

49 KEARNEY SQUARE 



Same day service 
when requested 



68 



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FRIENDLY ICE CREAM SHOP of Lowell 

CENTRAL SHOPPING PLAZA 
KEEP ACQUAINTED 452-8727 




WE WOULD LIKE TO CARE FOR 
YOUR INSURANCE 

Study it. Plug any gaps. Watch over it. And keep you 
up-to-date. Ours is a total service — for the individual, 
business, or both. All lines including life. 

Fred.G Church & Company 

Insurance since 1865 

Lowell, Chelmsford, Littleton 

in ANDOVER the Smart & Flagg Agency 



Compliments of 



LEFTY'S DRIVE-IN 

600 Rogers St. on Rt. 38 Lowell, Mass. 
452-8375 

Pizza • Torpedoes • Hamburgs - Clams - Dogs 

Take Out Service Table Service 



69 



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PHONE 475-4821 



OLDE ANDOVER VILLAGE 



FRKE DELIVERY • ANDOVER. LAWRINCI, NO. ANOOVM 

93 MAIN STREET, ANDOVER, MASS. 01810 
CLINTON E. RICHARDSON 



// 

YOU CAN DEPEND ON 

*^ CLEANING 

S EAST MERRIMACK STREET, LOWELL. MASS. 



Motors - Automatic Transmission 
Brakes 

BLACKSTOCK GARAGE 

Experienced Repairing 

Tel. GL 2-4871 



572 Rogers St. 



Lowell, Mass. 



Compliments of 

ANDOVER BOOK STORE 












!»«* 






Nl 




; 



LOWELL GAS COMPANY 

SERVING COMMUNITY 
AND INDUSTRY 



70 





CLUB 



67 6 






71 



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YOUNG JRS. SHOP 

feature fashions 

YOUNG, LIVELY 

Moving ... To The 

Beat of the Moment 



BON MARCHE 



153 MERRIMACK ST., LOWELL 



DEMERS PLATE GLASS CO. 

OF LOWELL 
GLASS AND MIRRORS OF ALL KINDS 

AGENTS FOR 
S*AtVtH OVERHEAD TYPE DOORS 

54 CHURCH STREET, LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 01853 



Compliments of 

PARADISE DONUTS 



MT. PLEASANT 
SPRING WATER CO., INC. 

Steadman St. LOWELL, MASS. 

Tel. 459-9041 



One hundred twenty-six years 
a prescription store 

F. and E. BAILEY & CO. 

Prescription Specialists 

79 Merrimack St. 19 John St. 

Lowell, Mass. 



72 



^^jCj»~w» 'T iiiii»i rM l »*KW i l ^C H l'iiissjj 



. 



-.^r^ N 







73 



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'fr- 




tompkuiuKU. *7 

i&jLfJL lUeuLaML. cun<L Jaunty.- 




& 



^^n^flnO t ' 



v^ 



Compliments of 



MATTHEW MILAN 

Designer and Maker of Fine Jewelry 



Rm. 317 Washington Bldg. 
Liberty 2-3117 



387 WASHINGTON ST. 
BOSTON 8, MASS. 




FLMiJtea^— 



JOHNSTON'S BAKERY 

295 Westford St. 
LOWELL, MASS. 



74 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



E. A. WILSON CO 



700 Broadway 

Lowell, Massachusetts 



FUELS 



75 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



BROX'S DAIRIES 



STANLEY C. MARSDEN 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 



43 Livingston Ave. GLenview 2-4482 

Lowell 



Heating & Cooling Equipment 
— Fuels — 
D. T. SULLIVAN CO., INC. 

1012 GORHAM ST. TEL SL 4-7857 



76 



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AG HARDWARE SUPPLY 
CO., INC. 


GEORGE'S TEXTILE CO. 

FABRICS FROM AMERICAS FINEST MILLS 


776 LAKEVIEW AVENUE 




LOWELL, MASS. 01850 




C-RICH FRUIT JUICES, Inc. 


NEW ENGLAND FIRE 
EQUIPMENT COMPANY 


1040 GORHAM ST. 


-SALES and SERVICE - 


LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 


63 LANE ST. LOWELL, MASS. 




Telephone GL 2-3779 




Compliments of 


DIAMOND TAXI 

128 Warren St. 


BRADT BAKERY, INC. 

BAKERS OF FINE CRACKERS 
Since 1833 


Lowell, Mass. 


Whiting St. Lowell, Mass. 



UNITED RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT 



297 CENTRAL ST. 



LOWELL, MASS. 



77 




78 



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TEWKSBURY LAWN MOWER CENTER 

1080 Main Street 
Tewksbury Center, Mass. 



Tel. 851-9182 



Compliments of 

RUSSELL LUMBER CO. 



RIVERSIDE POTATO SERVICE, INC. 



Edward Kelly Co. 

Industrial and Commercial 
SHEET METAL WORKERS 

„==,,.,.„ H6 FLETCHER STREET 
Telephone 458-8313 

LOWELL. MASS. 


Best Wishes 

ANDOVER INN 

on the campus of 
PHILLIPS ACADEMY 


Compliments of 

A FRIEND 


Ave atque vale 

the LATIN CLUB 



79 



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'fou.uo.rs 
_ lc 
FemmtS 
ScLOawteS 




Charge. 










O'CONNOR & HILL HARDWARE 



460 Lawrence Street 



LOWELL, MASS. 



Compliments of 

GENE'S HI GRADE 
ICE CREAM 



GAUMONT BROS., INC. 

"Where Television and Appliances 
are a specialty . . , 
not just a sideline" 



39 Kearney Sq. 
opposite the P.O. 



455-5656 



80 



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u 



J 





81 



SPLINTERS 




miQHjKs cjXDias 

449<~Mapleton<^4ve., Suffield, Conn. 15B South<^Main Street, West Hartford, Qonn. 







"For Better Health Eat More Fish" 


2P? 


DEBATE 
CLUB 


W. J. HOARE 

Wholesale and Retail 
Fresh Fish, Oysters, Clams, Lobsters, etc. 




461 Lawrence St. LOWELL, MASS. 


' 




Dial 2-3571 




Compliments of 




PUTHAM & SON 


207 MARKET ST. 


LOWELL, MASS. 




JANE T00HER 



Sports Clothes, Inc. 

598 COLUMBIA RD. DORCHESTER, MASS. 



82 



SPLINTERS 



K^omp I intent A of 




l or I40U who care . . . 
the cleaner who 



^ervi 



n 



9 



\Jver 30 L^ommunitieA Jhrouahout 



Ok 



til errimach Ualtt 



? 



83 



SPLINTERS 



Food for the Hungry 

Drink for the Thirsty 

Rest for the Weary 

TOWN HOUSE MOTOR INN 

Specializing in personalized service 
to groups of up to seventy people 

BANQUETS - MEETINGS - SHOWERS - WEDDINGS 



Compliments of 



THE LOWELL FRUIT CO. 





JAMES F. BRINE, Inc. 

Waxes 
Oftlzletic Outfitters 

(complete Sportlnq Cfoooi 

Jnen s - (jdomens Sport dlotnes 

29 Brattle Street, Harvard Square 
TR 6-4218 • Cambridge, .Mass. 



84 



SPLINTERS 



E. C. Pearson Painting Co., Inc. 

Harold A. Linstad, Prop. 
Interior Decorators and Painting Contractors 



IMPORTED and DOMESTIC 
WALLPAPERS 



PAINTS, OILS, VARNISHES 
AND ENAMELS 



90 HAMPSHIRE STREET 



LOWELL, MASS. 



LOCKE AND NATIONAL POWER LAWN MOWERS 
PEERLESS SNOW PLOWS 

Stephen (Bjui&cj Qd., Qnc. 

625 MAIN STREET (Route 38) 
WILMINGTON. MASSACHUSETTS 



658-6 160 



Compliments of 

DRS. WILLIAM R. PEPIN, SR. 
and W. REID PEPIN 



85 



SPLINTERS 




JOHN A. HUTCHINSON 

BUILDING CONTRACTOR 

GL 2-1956 






A. A. SMITH & CO., INC. 



Est. 1906 

Authorized Dealers Olivetti Underwood 

Sales • Service • Rentals 

34 Central Street LOWELL, MASS. 

GL 7-7481 







86 



SPLINTERS 



Tel. 452-4771 



Douglas & C< 



L 



'ouglas 0£ company, inc. 

SLATE, GRAVEL, TILE AND METAL ROOFING 

CORNICE AND SKYLIGHT WORK 

147 Rock Street Lowell, Mass. 01854 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 




S/* 




87 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



THE STUDENT COUNCIL 




The 

Photography 

Club 



WOOD-ABBOTT CO. 



Established 1872 



Diamond Merchants and Jewelers 



75 MERRIMACK STREET 



LOWELL, MASS. 



Compliments of 

A FRIEND 



THE BARROWS TRAVEL 
SERVICE, INC. 

420 Hildreth Building 

45 Merrimack St. LOWELL, MASS. 

459-9319 



88 



SPLINTERS 



Best Wishes from the 








^^^^^^^*y 


ll ^^^n \ t\. 


BARRY'S PASTRY SHOP 




434 CENTRAL ST. LOWELL, MASS, 




TEL. 452-1519 


^"^ Sigh J. 


WEDDING AND BIRTHDAY CAKES 


< . - I'- 





C<3£ 







c 



H 









o 



R ft 



Vrw*. 



ftAVA 






89 



SPLINTERS 



Get It At 

Parkway Prescription Pharmacy 

James J. Queenan, Reg . Ph. 
309 ROGERS ST. - LOWELL, MASS. 

Free Delivery Phone GL 4-4831 



ertsoiis 

FURNITURE-RUGS 
€&> 1086 

LOWELL'S LARGEST furniture store for 80 years 



JOSEPH E. STAVELEY 

Plumbing and Heating 

STEAM, GAS & WATER SYSTEMS 



Residence 

Westford Road Shop 

Chelmsford 490 Chelmsford St 

Dial 2-3741 Lowell, Mass. 



90 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



^<zMa& Suicfc, lac. 



91 



— 



776-461 1 



SPLINTERS 



Svueo StucUa 

- PHOTOGRAPHERS - 

286 BROADWAY, WINTER HILL 
SOMERVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 02145 



92 



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SPLINTERS 

Editor-in-Chief 
Elizabeth Bullock 



Donna Brion 
Charlotte Brohard 
Place Downey 



Literary Board 



Jodi Landwehr 
Francine Leoff 
Christina Wright 



Katherine DeBlois 
Kathryn Kirchmaier 



Business Board 



Manager— Lindsay Bacon 



Cynthia Mack 
Claire Scannell 



Sherrill Warner 



Art 



Editor— Laura Lockwood 



Informal Photographer— Lorraine LaCour 



Faculty Literary Advisor 
Mrs. Banks S. Worsham 



Faculty Art Advisor 
Mrs. John Perloff 



EDITORIAL 

On many levels people assert themselves as individuals for a variety of 
eventual gains. We feel justified in pursuing these gains in that our moti- 
vations are intellectual, individual, or perhaps spiritual. Barreling through 
life our needs are our directors, yet, beyond the thoughtless age, many of us 
acquire a certain amount of control which enables us at least to tolerate 
others. Tolerance, however, is not nearly enough. Of course it is necessary 
for any eventual attempt at understanding, but tolerance is also a passive 
acceptance of all that may not be understood or that is misunderstood. And 
the attempt to understand must be given priority over all other human 
endeavors. Surviving among other peoples or nations with less tension 
demands continual compromise and alterations of personal aims, open- 
mindedness, respect, all resulting in understanding of one another's needs. 

Unfortunately, remaining children throughout our lives, many of us 
are steered solely by emotion. To protect ourselves and our little world we 
often silence, even kill, our saviors— those who speak ancient words in 
which the answer to living is found: universal love, the real meaning of 
man's existence. This answer, this love, is basic but not simple in definition 
or in acquisition. 

Instead we fill our lives with nonsense, cynicism, some sarcasm, all of 
which are useless and painful portions of the personality and are most often 
masks of inward turmoil. Interior blindness is displayed in such seemingly 
exterior ways. 

Selfishly each man grapples for a lead position no matter how false a 
stand his values allow him to take. He fears and mistrusts his inner self 
and the confusion accompanying its discovery in the raw. Furthermore, he 
fears others as well, for man cannot wholly accept his limitations and he 
dreads appearing weaker or lower than another. Yet what is the validity of 
comparison? Human history has proved that men are essentially the same: 
the only meaningful difference lies in ethical values. Still, man will run 
from, or sometimes attack blindly, situations that threaten his status; thus 
grows hostility between religions, nationalities and races. Such hostility 
is primitive and the arguments against the discriminatory thinking that 
leads to it are highly rational. How is it that man, supposedly the supreme 
creation, cannot dissolve the barriers that he erects between himself 
and love? 




Miss Hildred Ramsay 
Headmistress of Rogers Hall 



TO THE MEMBERS OF THE SENIOR CLASS 

This, your graduating year, has been an exciting one 
at Rogers Hall— the year of our 75 th anniversary. During 
our preparations and celebration, to which you contributed 
greatly, we heard much talk of Elizabeth Rogers and the 
principles for which she stood. I would like to think that 
the inscription on her tombstone has applied to your years 
here: "She hath done what she could." But today I would 
also like to remind you of that other stalwart sister Emily 
and her inscription, which may contain the most meaning- 
ful message to send you on your way: "Go forth and do it." 



Jn Utemanam 




MANUEL J. FURTADO 



DEDICATION 

This yearbook is dedicated to the memory of our friend 
and helper, Manuel Furtado. His generous spirit was a fine 
example to us and will remain with us always. Manuel 
found joy in giving of himself, and what bigger gift can a 
man give. His gentleness and his warmth are greatly missed. 
We who knew him could not help but love him, and we will 
not forget. 



A teacher who can arouse a feeling for one single good 
action, for one single good poem, accomplishes more 
than he who fills our memory with rows on rows of 
natural objects, classified with name and form. 

—Goethe 




Miss Anne Dorland Pulling 
spanish and french 

Mrs. Frances Jones 
alumnae secretary 

Miss Mary Haynes 

ENGLISH 



Miss Dorothy LeButt 

PIANO, MUSIC APPRECIATION, 
AND GLEE CLUB 



Miss Dorothy Phelps 

LATIN AND FRENCH 



Miss Doris Alexander 

MATHEMATICS 




Miss Diane Haber 

MATHEMATICS 

Miss Carol Robinson 

HISTORY, LIBRARIAN AND 
ACADEMIC SECRETARY 

Miss Barbara Bins 

HISTORY AND CURRENT EVENTS 




Mrs. Dorothy Perloff 
art and history of art 



Mrs. Dorothy A. Worsham 

ENGLISH AND DRAMATICS 





Mrs. M. Sargent 

HOUSEMOTHER 



Mrs. B. Crosbie 

DIETICIAN 



Mrs. A. Jones 

HOUSEMOTHER 



Mrs. Louise Staten 
secretary 



Mrs. Doris Phinney 
financial secretary 




Mrs. Pamela Hoffer 

FRENCH 

Mrs. Judith Sadowski 

biology, chemistry, 

general science 

Miss Carol Bowes 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND PHYSIOLOGY 




Mrs. Barbara Brewer 
nurse 



Mrs. Nina Latour 
shorthand and typing 





et tu. Brute? 




You may think I'm kidding 



Hey Chuck! . . . where s Cin? 



A smile is my umbrella 




Do 1 HAVE to do DEAR JANE? 




en francaisll or else . . . 



Let me demonstrate 




m 






o be properly dressed is everything 



Gathe 



er ye rose 



y 



buds 




Did she really say, "King Federal" . . .? 



How do you read me, Roger . . .? 



Not in the clamor of the crowded street, 
Not in the shouts and flaudits of the throng, 
But in ourselves are triumph and defeat. 



—St. Francis 












m\mm; 









irlttff fc'vil 







Rogers Hall will serve as the guideline for us who now 
will experience new adventures. All that we have learned 
may now be applied to circumstances that we will encounter. 
However diverse our paths may be, Rogers Hall has pro- 
vided the foundation for us to build upon. I give grateful 
thanks to Rogers Hall and best wishes to all of us alumnae 
and to those remaining within the picket fence. 

—Charlotte Brohard 







Senior Class Officers 

Vice-President Cynthia Tom.su 

President Charlotte Brohard 




LINDSAY GORDON BACON 

1127 Ranfield Lane 
Flint, Michigan 

University of Denver 



"Where the ivillingness is great, the difficulties 
cannot he great." 



"Bag Andover" ... Ice Cream . . . "Got 
to lose weight" . . . Gegenheimer . . . 
blind date in Ohio . . . England, Nassau, 
etc. . . . time watch for math class . . . 
"I'll never get my work done" . . . Super- 
snowed . . . Williams weekend . . . long 
bicycle rides . . . right . . . Clairoxide? 
. . . Michigan . . . perfectionist. 



CAE Club 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Ski Club 2, 3, 4 

Proctor 3 

Volleyball 2 (2nd team), 3 (2nd team), 

4 (2nd team) 
Hockey 4 (2nd team) 

Softball 2 (2nd team), 3 (manager), 4 (manager) 
Basketball 3 (2nd team) 
Swim team 2 
Water Ballet 2, 3 
Honor Roll 3 

Senior Luncheon Literary Chairman 3 
Splinters Business Board Manager 4 
Christmas Chorus 3, 4 
Cae-Kava Fair Cookie Chairman 4 
Current Events 4 (Honorable Mention) 



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KATHERINE SABINE BEERS 

214 Southdown Road 
Huntington, New York 

Pine Manor Junior College 

President of the Student Council 








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Mother . . . please WE'D rather do it our- 
selves . . . Who has the Keys? . . . The 
Actress . . . sophisticated . . . Amy . . . 
Peter . . . loves me, he loves me not! . . . 
K.S.B. ready for marriage . . . Excellent 
Posture . . . COMPETITION MAJOR. 
Mother sees ALL, hears ALL, and Knows 
ALL . . . flattery will get you nowhere. 




"Common sense is not so common" 



CAE Club 

Hockey Team (second team) 3 

Tennis and Badminton 2 (Manager) 

French Club 3, 4 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Hockey 4 (Manager) 

Dramatics Club 2, 3 (President), 4 

Dramatics 2, 3, 4 

Honorable Mention— Dramatics 2, 3, 4 

Columns Staff 2, 3 

Council 3, 4 (President) 

Christmas Chorus 2, 4 

Prom Committee 4 

Library Committee 3 

Senior Luncheon Art Chairman 3 

Posture Award 3, 4 

Student Marshal 3 



• 




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DONNA EUGENIE BRION 

Skunks Misery Road 

Locust Valley 

Long Island, New York 

Mount Vernon Junior College 



Jf 



Greetings 



Alligator 



"The sound is an echo to the sense." 



KAVA Club 
Hockey 2, 4, (2nd team) 
Volleyball 2 (2nd team), 4 (2nd team) 
Basketball 4 

Softball 2 (2nd team), 4 
Columns 2, 3 
Splinters Literary Board 4 
Undergraduate Literary Award 2 
Senior Luncheon Committee 2 
Debate Club 3, 4 (Co-chairman) 
French Club 3, 4 
Glee Club 3, 4 
Fathers' Day Committee 3 
Parents' Day Poster Committee (Chairman) 
Proctor 3 
Tennis 4 

Badminton 4 (Cup Winner) 
Swimming Team 4 (Manager) 
Athletic Award 4 
R. H. Award 4 

Current Events 4 (Honorable Mention) 
Katherine W. MacGay Literary Awards 
4 (Honorable Mention) 



. . . Tomorrow I 
start my diet ... St. Mark's . . . I've 
memorized the map of surrounding boys' 
schools . . . and then, he attacked me . . . 
this half is mine . . . shut up, Brion . . . 
hysterical dissertations . . . my twin bro- 
ther . . . last year's G.D.A. . . . bats and 
P.A.'s weekend . . . vicious birds . . . 
Miss Bird. . . 







CHARLOTTE CLARK BROHARD 

73 Weeks Avenue 
Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York 

Sweet Briar College 

President of the Senior Class 



Charlie . . . sure bet . . . cheese and 
crackers . . . don't go . . . beeathrobe . . . 
Rusty, Jay— fickle? . . . who's the cute one 
in the middle? . . . ya know . . . theeee 
dance . . . wanna sing a duet? Duet! . . . 
N.Y.M.A. ... the sun did it ... I just 
can't fathom that one! . . . waiting for the 
ice to harden . . . you're not going to be 
any fun today! . . . 











V 



J 




"Virtue is bold and goodness never fearful." 



CAE Club 

Columns 3 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Honor Roll 3, 4 

Class Vice-President 3 

French Club 4 

Neatness Award 3 

Basketball 4 (2nd team Captain) 

Volleyball 4 (Manager) 

Softball 4 

Andover Dance Committee 3 

Founder's Day General Co-Chairman 4 

Spring Dance Chairman 4 

Senior Luncheon Literary Board 3 

R. H. Award 4 

Underhill Honor 4 




ELIZABETH WELMAN BULLOCK 

P.O. Box 243 
Johnsonville, South Carolina 

University of Denver 

Editor of Splinters 



"Moments of high proud exultation that only a 
discoverer can experience ..." 



CAE Club 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Dramatics 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 3, 4 

Ski Club 4 

Splinters Editor-in-Chief 4 

Katherine Whitten MacGav Literary Prize 3, 4 

Hockev 2, 3, 4 (2nd team) 

Volleyball 3, 4 

Basketball 3, 4 (Captain) 

Softball 2, 3 

Senior Luncheon Art Committee 2, 3 

Christmas Chorus 2 

Founder's Day Team 4 

Photography Club 4 

Art Prize 4 



A day tripper . . . "The wanderer" ... a 
Celtic lover . . . Rhode Island . . . Martin 
Moore . . . mind over matter. Tiffanv! All 



keyed up 

delegate 

commuter. 



flipped-out! . . . fire door 
the Boston Common's 




KATHERINE WELDIN DEBLOIS 

Fairhaven Hill 
Concord, Massachusetts 

Briarcliff College 

President of CAE 




Trinity weekends . . . Harvard "Ham" 
. . . Exeter . . . Such an efficient leader 
. . . Well, we were on the slopes . . . 
Bermuda . . . Sheldon! . . . But Miss 
Ramsay— it's snowing . . . I'm in love! . . . 
Stuart is underground??! . . . Gravestone 
reading . . . the little old lady . . . Now 
Mrs. Worsham, my mother . . . apple . . . 




"The real value of love is the increased general 
vitality it 'produces." 



CAE Club 

President of Day Students 4 

Council 4 

French Club 2, 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 3, 4 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Sflinters Business Board 4 

Columns 2, 3 (Business Manager) 

Hockey 3 (2nd team), 4 

Basketball 4 (2nd team) 

Vollevball 3 (2nd team) 

Softball 4 

Dramatics 2, 3, 4 

Senior Luncheon 3 




FRANCES PLACE DOWNEY 

3476 Jackson Street 
San Francisco, California 

California Western University 



"In the life of a young woman the most essential 
thing for happiness is the gift of friendship." 



KAVA Club 

French Club 2, 3 (Vice-President), 4 (President) 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 3, 4 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Dramatics 2, 3 

Art Survey Award 2, 4 

Honor Roll 3, 4 

Water Ballet 2 

Hockey 2 (2nd team), 3 (2nd team), 4 (2nd team) 

Volleyball 3 (2nd team), 4 (manager) 

Basketball 3 (manager), 4 (2nd team) 

Proctor 3, 4 

Andover Dance Committee 4 

Christmas Chorus 4 

Father's Day Entertainment 3 

Tennis 4 

Chairman of Tagging Committee for 

Parents' Weekend 4 
Music Appreciation Award 4 
Parsons Honor 4 



Place . . . It's spring! ... I just have to 
stay on my diet! . . . Michigan in the 
summer . . . Jim! . . . Who'd you get a 
letter from today? . . . Midnight Hour 
. . . Do you have any coffee I can borrow? 
... I can't wait! . . . Complex about her 
height? . . . Only two more months . . . 
Want to go watch TV? . . . Half of the 
Wright-Place . . . Ribbit . . . that smile! 




KATHERINE ELLINGTON 

424 Ocampo Drive 
Pacific Palisades, California 

Green Mountain Junior College 




Come in if you must . . . Get your abod 
out of my abode . . . My contacts went 
down the drain . . . It's going to be a bad 
day ... A letter from the Indian reserva- 
tion ... I miss Pierre . . . Bear . . . Hide 
the bobbie pin . . . 



"Who strives to the utmost, him we can save." 




KAVA Club 

Spanish Club 4 

Volleyball 4 (2nd team) 

Current Events 4 (Honorable Mention) 




ELIZABETH STREET FULLER 

511 Mapleton Avenue 
Suffield, Connecticut 

Endicott Junior College 

President of KAVA 



"Man draws from within himself, as from a spring, 
pleasure and joy." 



Fuller, it's your father calling from Italy 
. . . Hello Bill . . . letters, letters, letters 
. . . more letters . . . Beth, do you mind 
if . . . yes, terribly . . . O.T.L. . . . Good 
luck . . . Fun, fun, fun . . . I've read 
every English book this year! . . . Suffield 
Socialite . . . organization plus . . . 



KAVA Club 

Glee Club 2, 3 (Vice-President), 4 (President) 

Spanish Club 3, 4 

Ski Club 4 

Proctor 2, 4 

Volleyball 3 (2nd team) 

Hockey 4 (2nd team) 

Basketball 4 (2nd team) 

Water Ballet 2, 3 

Softball 4 

Christmas Chorus 3, 4 

Photography Club 4 

Current Events 3 (Honorable Mention) 

Octet 4 

KAVA Nominating Committee 3, 4 




. - - « 



• 



KATHARINE SARGENT HARVEY 

2025 Gratiot Avenue 
Saginaw, Michigan 

Colorado Alpine College 




. #^" 



Kaki . . . Ham . . . Hey Harvey . . . 
local connections . . . Higgins . . . "Watch 
out, Jack!" . . . Jimmy Hendrix . . . cher- 
ries . . . N.Y. legal . . . Hondas . . . Hey 
Mack, let's go to North Creek . . . Sunday 
afternoon walks . . . 



"Laugh and the world laughs with you." 




CAE Club 
French Club 2, 3, 4 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4 
Badminton 3 (Manager) 
Tennis 3 (Manager) 
Ski Club 2, 3, 4 
Commencement Play 3, 4 
Cheerleading 4 
Volleyball 4 (2nd team) 
Breakfast Club 4 (Vice-President) 



* 



< 




FELICITY WILLIAMS HOLIHAN 

68 Salem Street 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Endicott Junior College 



"No temper could be more cheerful than hers, or 
possess, in a greater degree, that sanguine ex- 
pectation of happiness which is happiness itself." 



CAE Club 
Debate Club 4 
Stagemanager 4 



I was really sick! . . . They found the 
ring! . . . Newport . . . Sailing, sailing. 
. . . London or bust— but then again . . . 
Ski trips??! . . . selling clothes . . . one 
little, two little, three little stitches . . . 
parents gone?!! . . . trips to Boston . . . 
natural hair color?! 





GEORGIA KENNEDY INNES 

93 Edwards Lane 
Atherton, California 

University of California at Davis 




G.I. . . . camera crazy . . . California here 
I come! . . . wild times in French class . . . 
explains with hands . . . guitar . . . flower 
power via sweet tarts . . . Dick . . . T.V. 
hysteria . . . independent nature . . . O.K. 
you guys, line up! 




"Music when soft voices die vibrates in the memory." 



CAE Club 
Photography Club 4 
Glee Club 3, 4 
French Club 3, 4 
R.H. Negatives 3, 4 (leader) 
Commencement Play 4 
Christmas Chorus 3, 4 
Father's Day Refreshment Committee 3, 4 
Song for Undergrads 3 

Katherine Whitten MacGay Literary Awards 
4 (Honorable Mention) 




DEBORAH ANNE JONES 

2 Whynwood Road 
Simsbury, Connecticut 

LaSalle Junior College 



"Possess your soul with -patience." 



Oooooh! . . . famous tales of wild Sims- 
bury . . . ah so! . . . Drew . . . you know, 
I think I could get to like him . . . sleeping 
beauty . . . Saturday splurges . . . Beauti- 
ful! ... a spur of the moment doer . . . 
sewing whiz . . . little boys . . . clunk . . . 
friendly to all . . . 



KAVA Club 

French Club 4 

Glee Club 4 

Lawrence Dance Committee 4 

Softball 4 (Manager) 

Proctor 4 

Tutoring Program 4 

Badminton 4 

Parents' Day Sewing Committee 4 

Founder's Day Sewing Committee 4 







ISABELLA ALICE KINNEY 

401 Summer Street 
Manchester, Massachusetts 

University of Denver 



OUT TO LUNCH? . . . JODI ... a 

Celtic Lover, . . . Rob . . . Kidd . . . the 
paper-cups . . . roses . . . from . . . (?) . . . 
Marty. ANYthing of mine is yours! Deb 
. . . three on a bottle . . . fire doors . . . 
Scott . . . Martin-member . . . those Man- 
chester RALLIES . . . foresight . . . 
V.W.(s) ... a member of the stoneage 
generation . . . Pancreas attacks! . . . 
Downtown ... the Library TRIPS ... A 
Friend ... the ROLLING GREEN . . . 
Flyer . . . 





"Whatever you do, crush the infamous thing 
(suspicion) and love those who love you." 



CAE Club 

Dramatics Club 4 

Dramatics 3 (Honorable Mention), 

4 (Honorable Mention) 
Field Hockey 
Volleyball 3 (2nd team) 
Basketball 3 (2nd team) 
Softball 4 

Swimming Team 3, 4 (Manager) 
Badminton 3 
Sub Mascot (Cae) 
R. H. Award 4 







KATHYRN MAHAN KIRCHMAIER 

28683 East River Road 
Perrysburg, Ohio 

University of Toledo 

Vice-President of KAVA 






"1 lay and rode the moonlight 
Upward through the errant houghs 



KAVA Club 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4 
Swimming 2, 3, 4 
Softball 3, 4 
Volleyball 4 
Hockey 4 (Captain) 
Basketball 4 
Founder's Day Team 4 
Proctor 3 

Christmas Chorus 3, 4 
Splinters Business Board 4 
Breakfast Club 4 
Commencement Play 4 



Chimp squeels . . . instant poetry . . . 
trees are so intimate . . . Ah-so Challie 
. . . motown sound . . . what Jimi Hen- 
drix can do at personal appearances . . . 
sweat it out . . . Cheshire cat . . . itch 
much? ... a bonus vacation . . . gas mask 
. . . what shall I wear on the plane . . . 
Williams . . . across the border . . . Pewter 
Pot Shop . . . one way to Tyngsboro . . . 
speedy swimmer and driver. 




ELIZABETH LORRAINE LaCOUR 

1 5 Hillside Road 
New London, Connecticut 

Gulf Park Junior College 



Tiffany ... a Celtic Lover . . . Master 
Jack . . . I'll never never come back" . . . 
firedoor fiend ... The SHOW-OFF . . . 
Yale? Harvard? Dartmouth? . . . Paul 
Martin . . . Try a Tiffany weekend plan 
. . . Lilies . . . who's been sleeping in our 
beds? . . . KIDD ... on time . . . worth 
her weight in gold . . . Bottles . . . The 
doctor . . . the dentist . . . 



» 





"Second thoughts are ever wiser." 



KAVA Club 
French Club 3, 4 
Ski Club 3, 4 
Dramatics Club 2, 3, 4 
Dramatics 2, 3 
Photography Club 4 
Splinters Photography 4 
Field Hockey 2, 3, 4 
Volleyball 2, 3, 4 
Basketball 2, 3, 4 
Softball 2, 3, 4 
Tennis 2, 4 
Badminton 2, 3, 4 
Cheerleading 2, 3, 4 
R. H. Award 2, 3, 4 
Field Day Team 4 





JODI PHYLLIS LANDWEHR 

98 South Division 
Holland, Michigan 

Northwood Institute of Art 



"Though this he madness yet there is method in it." 



CAE Club 

French Club 3, 4 

Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 3 (Vice-President), 4 (President) 

Dramatics Honorable Mention 2, 3, 4 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Senior Luncheon Literary Committee 2, 3 

Cheerleading 3V2 (mascot) 

Hockey 1 (2nd team), 3 (2nd team) 



O.T.L. ... a mailbox ... is that dust on 
your coat . . . Archade . . . back of the 
hand . . . Camaro . . . Mobil . . . did you 
say Roxbury 1 ? . . . tell Hamlet Jodi says 
Hi . . . C. C. Clanslady . . . fire escape 
socialite . . . hey Blondie . . . basement 
theatre of pantomine . . . bods . . . rollers 
. . . absolutely insane and her father should 
know about it . . . regeneration at the 
beach . . . Roger Dodger . . . it's for laun- 
dry, popcorn, and a trunk . . . Kidd . . . 
Martin member. 




FRANCINE SUE LEOFF 

1 1 George Street 
Andover, Massachusetts 

Randolph-Macon College 



Frankie ... "I didn't do any homework 
last night" . . . Willy alias London Fog 
. . . Wild Bowdoin Weekend . . . weekly 
horse shows . . . Light blue convertible; 
Road Runner some day? . . . "You're 
weird" ... "I have a gym number?" . . . 
Twenty-six in one night . . . ANDOVAH 
. . . those Sunday afternoons in the Park 
. . . "Ask me if I care" . . . Tim . . . Look 
out Virginia! 




"Curiosity is one of the permanent and certain 
characteristics of a vigorous mind." 




KAVA Club 

Columns 2, 3 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

French Club 2, 3, 4 

Hockey 3 (2nd team) 

Basketball 4 (2nd team) 

Vollevball 3 (2nd team), 4 (2nd team) 

Debate Club 3 

Honor Roll 4 




LAURA KYLE LOCKWOOD 

79 Eastway 
Mount Kisco, New York 



"The 'pursuit of perfection, then, is the pursuit of 
sweetness and light." 



Dressmaker over-night . . . Isn't that cute? 
. . . TOMMY . . . biting off split ends 
. . . finally pierced ears! . . . "Anyone for 
clam digging?" . . . quiet . . . Pistachio Ice 
Cream with Pistachio Nuts . . . holy fin- 
gers . . . "Has my hair grown?" . . . 
phone's RINGing . . . artistic . . . drying 



up: 



lost towels . . . "Hold that pose!" 



KAVA Club 

Octet 3, 4 

Ski Club 3 

Andover Poster Committee 3 

Splinters Art Editor 4 

Senior Luncheon Art Chairman 3 




LEE ANN McKALLAGAT 

135 Academy Road 
North Andover, Massachusetts 

University of Denver 




"t*" - -Q0 






Lee-Lee . . . He's really buggin' me! . . . 
I'm on a diet . . . Mad River— broken 
windshield wipers?!! . . . what a "jerk-off" 
. . . Killy! . . . I'm a walk-on . . . Hot 
cup of tea! tea! . . . Sto-o-o-p it . . . Har- 
vard? . . . Weekends in Lincoln . . . She's 
got my "pony"! 




"The only reward of virtue is virtue; the only way 
to have a friend, is to he one." 



CAE Club 
French Club 4 
Glee Club 3, 4 
Cheerleader 4 
Hockey 3 (2nd team) 
Commencement Play 4 




MARTHA EMMONS PARKINSON 

Copper Beeches 
Cotuit, Mass. 

Cygnets House 
London, England 




They're so much in love 



I'm snowed 



"He only lives who living, enjoys life." 



... If I wait long enough it'll go on the 
incidentals . . . Mating call . . . Evoldo's 
in jail? . . . Larry's in jail? . . . I'm in love 
. . . Florence ... A night in Paris . . . 
My finger'S caught in the pencil sharpener! 
. . . Those little purple pills . . . Rip . . . 



KAVA Club 

Spanish Club 3, 4 

Debate Club 3, 4 (Co-chairman) 

Dramatics Club 3, 4 

Photography Club 4 

Water Ballet 1, 2, 3 

Parents' Day Fair (Chairman of Apron 

Committee) 4 
Tennis, Badminton 4 (Manager) 





ELIZA JANE PLIMPTON 

Old Sudbury Road 
South Lincoln, Massachusetts 

Hickox School 




"Sleep" much?? . . . She's such a "Noble" 
girl! . . . Miss Cover Girl, U.S.A. . . . Lee, 
could I borrow your black patent leather 
shoes?? . . . yellow roses . . . Lississa! . . . 
Sunshine! . . . Try to pull the reins in on 
me! . . . Emptv ski lodge . . . What color 
"white"? 



"We are conscious of beauty when there is a har- 
monious relation, between something in our nature 
and the quality of the object which delights us." 



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CAE Club 

French Club 2, 3, 4 

Cheerleading 2, 3 

Hockey 3 (2nd team), 4 (2nd team) 

Volleyball 2 (2nd team), 3 (2nd team), 

4 (2nd team) 
Softball 2 (2nd team) 






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CLAIRE THERESA SCANNELL 

131 Holyrood Avenue 
Lowell, Massachusetts 

George Washington University 



'However rare true love is, true friendshi-p is rarer." 



Ka-lay-eer! . . . Mrs. Jones, I have my 
mother's keys!! . . . K.A. Prom . . . Lefty's 
—here I come . . . My mother said . . . 6th 
period haircuts . . . Froggy winter courtin' 
. . . Me no see, me no hear . . . What'd 
you say?— what, what . . . Worsham's 
favorite daydreamer . . . fortune telling. 



CAE Club 

French Club 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 3, 4 

Debate Club 4 

Splinters Business Board 4 

Hockey 2 (2nd team), 3 (2nd team) 

Dramatics 4 




KATHARINE GOODRICH SHEPARD 

125 Hillside Road 
Kensington, Connecticut 

Garland Junior College 



«T> 

1 ve come 



Katie . . . Hot Lips . . . K. K. Katie . 
manual aids to concentration . 
to a conclusion" . . . Willard . . . "actually 
I'm not on the phone that much" . . . early 
to bed, early to rise . . . "okay, girls" . . . 
"I don't want to talk myself into this" . . . 
speech lessons by Johnson and Washburn 
. . . creative decor . . . close eyes— open 
mouth . . . "going home this weekend, 
Hot Lips?" . . . "Man, Have I got some- 
thing to tell you!" . . . The legs ... do 
you have? . . . 






"Good nature is more agreeable in conversation 
than wit and gives a certain air to the counten- 
ance which is more amiable than beauty." 



CAE Club 

Ski Club 3, 4 

Water Ballet 3 

Stagemanager 4 

Spanish Club 3, 4 

Basketball 4 (2nd team) 

Research Committee for Founder's Day 4 

Badminton 4 (Manager) 

Tennis 4 (Manager) 



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NANCY ALBERT SMITH 

Manley Street 
Marblehead, Massachusetts 

George Washington University 



"Ready I am to go, and my eagerness with sails full 
set awaits the wind." 



CAE Club 

Ski Club 2, 3, 4 (President) 

Photography Club 4 

Columns 2, 3 

Hockey 2, 3 (2nd team), 4 

Swimming 4 

Honor Roll 2 

Proctor 3 

Class President 3 



Nunders of Blancy . . . pretty many . . . 
Jay . . . sailing . . . skiing, V.W. . . . 
Punching bigger kids . . . Cambridge . . . 
Orange . . . Marblehead is home . . . 
Bombles . . . Man does Buddha cross his 
legs . . . Hmmm . . . good . . . Simon 
and Garfunkel . . . love that place . . . 

Where's my L.P. . . . 

. schmokel, I'm so fat 



John is so dear . 



Renting babies? 




FAY ANN SUTTON 

Cousins Island 
Yarmouth, Maine 

Endicott Junior College 






Ah so Charlie . . . I'm having a heart 
attack . . . There hi . . . oooooh!! . . . See 
ya lacier . . . Bermuda . . . Boogaloo . . . 
Rockie and Bulwinkle ... I forgot my 
prints . . . Brooks . . . Photography . . . 
King Federal . . . Electric Head . . . 
Touching shades . . . 




'The smiles that win, the tints that glow." 



CAE Club 

Ski Club 4 

Octet 4 

Spanish Club 3, 4 

Photography Club 4 (President) 

Hockey 4 

Swimming 4 

Senior Life Saving 3 




"Little things mean a lot" 



KAVA Club 

Glee Club 4 

Volleyball 3 (2nd team), 4 

Basketball 3 (2nd team), 4 

Hockey 4 (Manager) 

French Club 4 

Council 4 

Governor Dummer Dance Committee 3 

Honor Roll 3, 4 

Graduation Marshall 3 

Founder's Day Co-chairman 4 

Spring Dance Committee 4 

Helen Hill Award 4 



CYNTHIA KAY TOMSU 

3180 Gratiot Avenue 
Port Huron, Michigan 

Albion College 

Vice-President of the Senior Class 



Asleep by 3:00 a.m. . . . Dark Florida Tan 
. . . It's ALWAYS Tim! . . . Roses from 
an old flame . . . "What's the matter with 
my ankles?" . . . That's so darling . . . 
Cream filled donuts . . . An abundance of 
ace bandages ... "I have so many letters 
to answer" . . . How's the book? . . . 
short hair, some day . . . just because ice 
cream doesn't have bones . . . Want to 
see my turkey? . . . MICHIGAN! 




SHERRILL WARNER 

33 Cove Circle 
Marion, Massachusetts 

Lynchburg College 




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Breakfast Club . . . day leave to Cam- 
bridge . . . To be Diane or not to be Diane 
—that is the Question. He won't be a mil- 
lionaire if he works like Terrence Stamp- 
Love those loafers . . . "I'll know them by 
the night of the play" . . . You booger 
. . . Ambition ... At least Lynchburg 
wants me . . . you peon! 





"The ever importunate murmer, 'Dramatize it, 
dramatize it!' " 



CAE Club 

Dramatics Club 3, 4 

Debate Club 4 

Dramatics 3 (Honorable Mention), 4 

Splinters Business Board 4 

Hockey 4 (2nd team) 

Swimming 3 

Badminton 3 

Librarian 3 

Proctor 3, 4 

Sub Mascot 4 

Breakfast Club 4 (President) 

Current Events 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Dramatics Award 4 







DORRIS MARY WILLIAMS 

1219 Andover Street 
Lowell, Massachusetts 

Boston University 



"Silence more musical than any song." 



KAVA Club 
Hockey 4 
Swim Team 4 



I brought my slide rule! . . . Lab whiz??! 
. . . new twins . . . Church basketball 
team . . . S.B.D. . . . Mother's little 
helper . . . 




AMY FRANCES WILSON 

7 Prospect Street 
Williamstown, Massachusetts 

Massachusetts State College at 
North Adams 

Vice-President of CAE Club 




Amos . . . Killer . . . Armadillo . . . and 
earthworm . . . hippihome . . . La La La 
La La Bombard . . . Barnabus . . . the 
kissing disease . . . the tramp . . . queen of 
Petersburg's Pass . . . Breakfast Club . . . 
vice of P.R.A.S. ... I love him ... I love 
him not . . . Miss Pirouette. 



"We know nothing of tomorrow; otir business is to 
be good and hap-py today." 




mmmMm, 



CAE Club 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Water Ballet 1 

Class President 2 

Proctor 2 

Hockey 2 (2nd team), 4 

Volleyball 2, 3 (2nd team), 4 (Captain) 

Softball 2, 3 (2nd team Captain) 

Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4 

French Club 3, 4 

Basketball 3 (2nd team) 

Christmas Chorus 3, 4 

Current Events Award 3, 4 








KATHARINE STAFFORD WINTER 

60 South Main Street 
Suffield, Connecticut 

Green Mountain Junior College 



"Liberty of thought is the life of the soul." 



KAVA Club 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Spanish Club 3, 4 (President) 

Softball 1 (2nd team), 2 (2nd team) 

Water Ballet 2 

Hockey 2 (2nd team), 3 (2nd team), 4 (Captain) 

Basketball 2 (2nd team), 3 (2nd team), 4 

Music Appreciation 2 (Honorable Mention) 

Red Cross Swimmer Award 1 

Proctor 3 



Winters . . . Isn't it great to be back, girls? 
. . . the second floor alarm clock . . . what 
could be sweeter . . . It's 10:30 and I 
haven't started studying yet! Phone bills 
. . . Look out, here comes tomorrow! . . . 
see va later, sweetie . . . "If I were a 
carpenter . . . 





CHRISTINA JOAN WRIGHT 

Groton School 
Groton, Massachusetts 

Skidmore College 




Ray J. . . . orange crush and popcorn . . . 
superiority complex? . . . tuna fish . . . 
other half of the Wright Place . . . Don't 
you think it's too short? . . . I'm not mad! 
. . . chalk it up to experience . . . I'm 
never wrong . . . always put off today what 
you can do tomorrow . . . baseball is fun! 
. . . showers at 8:05 A.M. . . . famous 
imitations . . . 







"Discover in all things that which shines and is 
beyond corruption." 



KAVA Club 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Spanish Club 3, 4 

Photography Club 4 (Co-President) 

Ski Club 12, 3 

Dramatics Club 3, 4 

Dramatics 1, 4 

Columns 2, 3 (Editor-in-Chief) 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Cheerleading 3, 4 

Proctor 2 

Council 3, 4 

Honor Roll 1 

Hockey 3, 4 (2nd team) 

Volleyball 2, 3 (2nd Team), 4 

Softball 1 (2nd team), 2, 3, 4 

Swimming 1, 2, 3, 4 

Water Ballet 1 

Class Vice-President 2 

Octet 3, 4 

Basketball 4 (Manager) 

Tutoring at Moody School 4 

R.H. Award 4 



GRADUATION-ROGERS HALL 

(written in grateful appreciation by a '68 father) 

What if I a daughter be- 
Instead of basing the family tree- 
Would I not on this occasion 
Find time for much elation? 

Yes, I would, I know I would 
With all betwixt my ears, I should— 
The countless days sans all but feline 
Would leave me mute, without design. 

But then, a thought, a pearled tear 
The kinetograph of short years. 
This Rogers Hall, I now realize, 
Is more than I surmised. 

So off to cross the dunes of life 
My pretty head held high to strife, 
I would forevermore be knowingly blest 
By all my Rogers Hall behest. 



CALENDAR 



September 

20 THE OPENING OF THE SCHOOL YEAR 

Seeing old friends again and the beginning of new friendships. 
22 SINGING BEACH 

Experiencing a few grains of sand in a hot dog. 
30 EXETER DANCE 

Nervousness overcome by excitement. 

October 

1 VESPERS 

Characters of the stage were now a reality. 
4 SENIOR PICTURES 

Informality made formal. 
7 ANDOVER DANCE 

An introduction to Ivy League? 
9 SENIOR SISTER CEREMONY 

Candles extinguished; relationships lit 
11 INITIATION 

Encountering for the first time a test of endurance and sportsmanship. 
14 P.S.A.T.'s 

Gloom! 
16 CAE AND KAVA DINNER 

Spirit and loyalty expressed through various colors. 
20 ANDOVER CELEBRITY SERIES 

Vibrations of Ian and Sylvia amidst fanaticism. 
28 BROOKS DANCE 

November 

1 SECOND TEAM HOCKEY-CAE 
4 PARENTS' WEEKEND 

FIRST TEAM HOCKEY-CAE 

22 THANKSGIVING PLAYS 
Thespians supreme . . . 

23 THANKSGIVING VACATION 
Happiness is a long weekend. 

December 

2 SAT.'s 
Despair! 

ANDOVER DANCE-GLEE CLUB 

The underworld made celestial through the harmony of the Glee Club 
voices. 



December 

11 CHRISTMAS VESPERS 
SENIOR RING CEREMONY 

"Every tradition grows ever more venerable." 

12 CHRISTMAS PLAY 

Oriental splendor presented through "The Gift of Tenyin". 

13 CHRISTMAS VACATION 
Application of Dear Jane 



January 

2 

9 
11 
13 



15-19 



22-25 



25-29 



RETURN FROM VACATION 

"Christmas is over and Business is Business." 

SECOND TEAM VOLLEYBALL-KAVA 

FIRST TEAM VOLLEYBALL-CAE 

MIDDLESEX DANCE 
"Dancing in all its forms cannot be excluded from the curriculum of all 

noble education." 

REVIEW WEEK 
"From contemplation one may become wise, but knowledge comes only 

from study." 

EXAMS 

Knowledge applied to the theory. 

LONG WEEKEND 

A short break well deserved. 



February 

16 LAWRENCE DANCE 

Psychedelic visions appeared throughout the minds. 



March 

2 

4 
6 
8 

15 



TILTON DANCE 

Glee Club's grand night for singing. 
SECOND TEAM BASKETBALL-CAE 
FIRST TEAM BASKETBALL-CAE 
FREE DAY 
At last! 

SPRING VACATION 
"Now 'tis the Spring." 



April 



2 
27 



RETURN FROM SPRING VACATION 

Who's the "tannest" of them all? 
ST. MARK'S DANCE 



May 

4 ACHIEVEMENT TESTS 

Enduring three in one afternoon! 
9 PLANTING OF THE EVERGREEN TREE 

Dedication by the Dramatics Club in loving memory of Manuel. 
11 FOUNDER'S DAY 

The Seventy-fifth Anniversary Celebration of the founding of Rogers 

Hall— a day to remember! 

FATHER'S DAY 

Dancing highlighted by entertainment to provide a quick "breather" for 

the fathers. 
15 SCIENCE TRIP TO THE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE 

Observing all the phases of the scientific world. 
18 SPRING DANCE 

A formal-informal dance in the newly-planted garden of MacGay. 
21 SENIOR TRIP TO SEE HAMLET 
"Love it." 

23 SOFTBALL GAME-CAE 

24 SWIMMING MEET-KAVA 

Grace and form combined with speed and ability. 
20-24 REVIEW WEEK 

"Enough work to do, and strength enough to do the work." 
27-30 EXAMS 

"Happiness is Thursday afternoon." 

30 CAE AND KAVA DINNERS 

31 SENIOR SISTER-UNDERGRAD CEREMONY 

"The perfect friendship of two women is the deepest and highest sentiment 
of which the finite mind is capable." 
JUNIOR RING CEREMONY 
The beginning of a memorable tradition. 



June 



1 SINGING BEACH 

Taking life easy— "on the beach". 

BACCALAUREATE SERMON 
"As through life we fare." 

MUSICALE 

Glee Club. 

SENIOR LUNCHEON 

CLASS DAY EXERCISES 

COMMENCEMENT PLAY 

The Madwoman of Chaillot 

To speak of madness is to think of '68. 

RECEPTION FOR SENIOR CLASS 

COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 
"All experience is an arch, to build upon." 




Lindsay Bacon 




Beth Bullock 





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Kate DeBlois 





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Charlotte Brohard 



Kathy Ellington 

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Lisa Plimpton 





Laura Lockwood 


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Sherry Warner 







Dorrie Williams 



Amy Wilson 



Kathy Winter 



Tina Wright 



PROPHECY 

It's 1993 and, though still staggering from the 75th, Rogers Hall's now completely 
disjointed, out to lunch family of '68 has dropped out of their spaced-out realm into 
the hippie syndrome for a reunion, which just happens to coincide with the 100th. 
At first the returning throngs did not recognize the old alma mater, for the picket 
fence no longer marks the grounds. During the riots of the 70's collectors of artifacts 
of disappearing civilizations had carted off the ancient pickets and they may now be 
viewed at the Smithsonian. However, the lost landmark somehow makes the tent 
complex on old Fort Hill, now called Resurrection Hill, more of an integral part of 
the school. Tenting has been a RH way of life since '68, and of course, the day's 
activities will take place on the Hill, rather than on the old hockey field, now occupied 
by a giant smoke house. 

Katie Shepard Soaper has arrived first with all the little Suds to give us the 
latest gossip from her central control . . . "Hotlips" is sizzling with news from the 
Ivy League circuit. Katie, our official correspondent, feared that Tina Wright would not 
make the 100th, but alas, Tina is ambling through the park, with her camera, and 
just might arrive soon. Earlier, she related to us that she is living, as ever, on the 
Groton campus and holds nighttime reading sessions for all interested. Her children 
have been quite well behaved today, but Tina, of course, never knows when they are 
not. 

Tiffany LaCour, Mrs. J. P. Morgan, Jr., the social director of the day, has just 
shimmied through with her caravan of weekend wardrobes. Her little darlings, not 
having seen mother for vears, are apparently boarded at school abroad. 

Felicity Happiness Holihan, voted in 1968 to be the first to plunge into marriage, 
surprised us all and instead has become a successful businesswoman. After several 
gav years as a demonstrator of Harley Davidsons, she decided to turn to an old family 
enterprise. As a result, the refreshments today, under her chairmanship, are a slightly 
revised version of the traditional sherry. 

Leaving her duties in misty Maine, Fay Sutton, a renowned authority on photo- 
graphy, has arrived to reopen the Bloom Room. She has resigned her life to seeking 
donations and support for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored 
Pictures. Mr. Dickerson has had to reform his original opinion of Fay. Faysie has 
been energetically flashing flicks of Laura Lockwood who has returned with Tommy, 
of course. Today she is having a one-man showing of her paintings through the past 
twenty-five years. Laura and Tommy are living happily in Florida where Laura 
designs and sells her Laura Lilies. 

Thinking Kathy Ellington was a freshman one of the faculty just made the 
gross error of asking her if she would mind babysitting. She responded with a tantrum 
and suddenly we all felt quite at home, as if the old days had really returned. 

Frankie Leoff zipped up from Virginia with her Olympic "stah" husband in 
one of DaDa's roadrunners. Frankie's family is now world-famous for its phenomenal 
record of having children born in the saddle; they then simply ride on to victory. 
Upon receiving a desperate plea for a ride from a few penniless ex-day students, 
Frankie first picked up former Miss America Plimpton. We've learned that Lisa had 
a difficult time in choosing between SLEEP and her photographer, but the latter 
won out. The outstanding photographic display of today shows Lisa through the ages 
of style since '68, and even in '93 she's as sporting as ever. Lee McKallagat joined, 
Frankie along the way in her fleet of Volkswagen buses laden down with children. 
Lee tells us that she keeps her girlish figure by keeping the caravan moving with 
the seasons between Denver and Florida and by fasting on all the right days. 

She, Frankie, and Lisa have been doing a great deal of skiing together this year, 
though, of course the old girls aren't as cool as they used to be on the slopes. 



i 



PROPHECY 

Kate DeBlois, now Mrs. Sheldon Sheldon, was to have joined the group coming 
up from Virginia too; however she was slightly delayed due to frequent stops at 
cemeteries. Kate, a renowned authority on gravestones, has brought a few autographed 
copies of her first book, Tombstones 1 Have Known. She says she looks forward to 
advancing age which she portrayed so well in RH plays. 

The Michigan crew has just arrived. Jodi Landwehr has come in her ancient 
Camaro, which she has kept in tiptop condition in memory of '68. Of course, Jodi, 
gassed up at Mobil, is now waiting for four friends to open up the refreshment 
stand. Jodi has the word of the day, but is letting us guess what it is. Now more 
experienced, Jodi is still designing on paper as well as in her head. We have been 
informed that she and Rod have been starring together in the Holland Community 
Playhouse, playing a revised version of The Odd Couple. 

Lindsay Bacon, the well-established manager of the Williamstown Gazette, has 
just arrived in the States from one of her annual voyages to London to see the Queen. 
Lin has taken the current Splinters Business Board aside and is tutoring them in 
bill collecting techniques. 

Kaki Harvey has flown in on her chartered jet, but she kept close watch for 
flying nuns. Kaki has rewarded us this day by singing a solo "She hath done what she 
could" under the direction of Beth Fuller. Beth will receive a citation today for her 
contribution to her profession: A Music Program to do Physical Therapy By, which 
has become world famous and has made her the Jazz Queen of P.T. Our class 
remembers Beth well for her many phone calls from her attentive father. 

Another Michiganite Cindy Tomsu left the Detroit riots and has been here days 
in advance aiding Carol in organizing the 100th year anniversary and in measuring 
the field for the demonstration exercises. Cin's health has been failing her recently due 
to late nights and she again has a bandaged ankle, but she was able to get out to get 
her hair re-streaked. Tim seems to be momentarily neglected, so another outcast, 
Charlie Brohard and her son Chuck are doing their best to entertain him. Charlie 
just came from the New York Militarv Academy where things got a little Rusty in 
the Kitchen area. Todav Charlie is making preparations for a throwing contest and. 
other fun games. 

Kim Kirchmaier Ryley and Richard just drifted in from a reunion at Williams 
where they attended— what else— a swimming meet. There is a hot demand today for 
Kimmie's beep-beep poetry. 

Miss Place Gatsby Downey has just returned from one of her two week summer 
parties in Michigan. Our stvlish pygmie has become quite slender after her life-long 
battle with diet pills and candy vs. ice cream. Place says the hippies are building an 
Insurrection City on their old plavgrounds and she is busily reading up on draft 
evasion for all future Jim's. 

Debbie Jones founded what we always knew she would— a rest home. Unfor- 
tunately she could not exert herself to make our 100th but she sends a shining smile. 

Mardi Parkinson now owns her own villa and is an active president of the 
Jet Set. Mardi tired of Mr. Zig Zag and has gone on to new kicks. Mardi loves her 
children to have all the fun they can, but, as her mother advised, she suggests they 
can do anything they like as long as they do it at home. In P. town, it is said that 
she has been flitting about a few "eccentric" social circles. 

With a swift gesture of her arm Kathy Beers has bade us hello. K. B. has become 
an RH trustee and president of her local P.T.A. Today she has endowed us with a 
lengthy dissertation on "How to make a right decision and still remain popular". She 
is presently part owner of a collegiate shoppe where she is now able to buy clothes 
economically too. 



PROPHECY 

Sherrv Warner has come in on her good ship Lollipop loaded down with "all 
sorts of groovy things". Sherry has lived many of her dramatic roles and as of late has 
taken on the job of a leading public critic. Of course Sherry managed to marry the 
millionaire Howard Hughes who has endowed the RH theatre, now known as 
"Sherry's Playhouse". Incidentally, Sherry has brought with her several of her 
rented children. 

A flash from Katie's information booth tells us that Kathy Winter is unable to 
join us due to an accident last week: as a result of her tripping over a waste basket! 
she broke her hand on the wall while trying to recover herself. Nonetheless, she is, 
as always, still laughing. We will miss her scheduled monologue "If I were a 
carpenter". 

Amy Killer Wilson and Ken have come with many first and second generation 
LaBomBards as was predicted in '68. The very prosperous "Five Flies" admits Killer's 
students at her country day school during their snack and recreation period. Amy has 
just been given a heartv welcome from her old senior year roommate but they have had 
little time together because Amy must make herself busy at the refreshment stand. 
We've just received Greetings from Donna Brion, the official orator of the day, and 
she and her brother are now making speech preparations. Fastidious Donna, now 
down to 105 pounds with short hair again, still wonders if her slacks look well. Donna 
has been attending C. W. Post and N.Y.U. for years— ever since graduating from RH— 
and is majoring in journalism. She is well read and knows more on any topic than 
anvone. Next week she expects to begin a lecture tour via her yacht in Florida. Nancy 
Dwindle Dwarf Smith has come with all her little Hoods in the Whaler by way of the 
Merrimack. Nancy is down to 95 pounds but is still just as energetic and just as 
tempermental. There is no doubt in our minds that Nancy is pleased to be back. 

Elizabeth Libertv Bullock has manv interesting tales to tell us of her career as a 
beachcomber. Beth, as alwavs just in from the sands of Rhode Island, has with her, 
her extraordinary collection of children all decked out in styles from Mommy's 
favorite emporium, the Armv-Navy Surplus. They, of course, have been raised, not 
on the obsolete ex-con Dr. Spock, but on Beth's own philosophy contained in her 
illustrated book Dear Beth inspired bv the "Jane" sessions at RH. 

Beth's rolling in was soon followed by Izzy Kinney's. Izz and Beth rehashed a 
few memorable experiences at Denver, but Isabel had almost forgotten those wild 
days, since she's been married for manv years. Isabel has become quite a horticulturist 
for the area of Manchester and she and her husband have offered the school some 
prize- winning roses and other plantings. 

Georgia Innes has returned with Dick to revive some antiquated protest songs. 
They have recorded Georgia's poetrv on multi-colored plastic records for freaking out, 
and these discs make fabulous collector's items. Georgia and Dick have been 
very preoccupied with contemplating the simplicity of nature. They may seek advice 
from Claire Gardenia Scannell who has erected a private tent at the top of Fort Hill. 
Since her '68 soothsaying davs of predicting marriages and numbers of future children, 
Claire has gone on to a great career in fortunetelling and today we are witnessing her 
amazing accuracy. Old and voung are lined up at her tent but during breaks she 
escapes to the golden arches, and at least now there is greater parking area for 
backing out of tight spots. Dorris Williams really followed through on Claire's predic- 
tion of eight children, including two sets of twins. Dorrie has out-Gerbered that other 
famous RH grad with her Instant Kiddie Foods and she was elected Mother of the 
Year 1985. 

Ah, there's the music— the demonstration is beginning— and there's Isabel Kinney 
II, alias Elizabeth Rogers, returning again. Won't you join us in watching the gala 
events? 

Beth Bullock and the Staff 



R. H. GREAT MOMENTS 




CLASS WILL 

WE LEAVE 

MISS RAMSAY eighty-seven sleeping bags for the next tenting night. 

MISS ALEXANDER an answering service for late night phone calls in 
the Hall. 

BILL a formula for instant and perpetual grass. 

MISS BOWES a pair of suspenders to hold up her skirts. 

MRS. BREWER all our next year's magazine subscriptions. 

MISS BUIS marching to the Moody School. 

MRS. CROSBIE cycling to the meat market. 

MISS HABER emancipation from our numberless society. 

MISS HAYNES a Poet's Corner. 

MRS. HOFFER ten lessons at the Atlas Muscle Building Salon so that she 
can win a round with Bruno. 

MRS. A. JONES an honorary FBI membership card. 

MRS. F. JONES a knight in shining armour to fight her monster machine. 

MRS. LATOUR the Grandmother of the Year Award. 

MISS LEBUTT a recording of the study hall choir singing her favorite 
song "The Mule Stood Around". 

MRS. MILLER an automatic counter for bus trips. 

MRS. PERLOFF four gallons each of orange and purple fluorescent paint 
for the psychedelic decor of the art room. 

MISS PHELPS some bloodhounds to help her find study hall deserters. 

MRS. PHINNEY a smoke screen for vacation times. 

MISS PULLING a magnetized pocketbook and a fur beanie for Sunday 
services. 

MISS ROBINSON an ambulance to bring her to school. 

ROGER a vear's leave of absence to get over his first three months at RH. 

MRS. SADOWSKI a lifetime supply of creepy-crawly creatures to make 
life in the dungeon gay. 

MRS. SARGENT all our emptied bottles. 

MRS. STATEN racing stripes for the new station wagon. 

MRS. WORSHAM a year's supply of INSTANT DINNERS for the boys 
back home. 



CLASS WILL 

LINDSAY BACON leaves Household Finance applications to those poverty-stricken 

club members who can't afford to pay for their Splinters ads. 
KATHY BEERS leaves dramatically. 

DONNA BRION leaves still talking her way in and out of airplanes. 
CHARLOTTE BROHARD leaves CHUCKING her nickname. 
BETH BULLOCK leaves flying high but dry, having climbed down from her reef 

to rejoin briefly her '68 classmates. 
KATE DeBLOIS leaves Sheldon and Hamilton and the whole Ivy League to find 

the true meaning of life. 
PLACE DOWNEY leaves en franQais for Malibu. 
KATHY ELLINGTON leaves a word. 
BETH FULLER leaves "Daddy" on the line. 
KAKI HARVEY leaves again, still laughing. 

FLIP HOLIHAN leaves early as usual, leading the rest of the day-trippers. 
GEORGIA INNES leaves the Octet "Blowin' in the Wind". 

DEBBIE JONES leaves her copy of the Simsbury Saga to the Rogers Hall library. 
ISABEL KINNEY leaves her OUT TO LUNCH pancreas to Mrs. Sadowski and 

medical history. 
KIM KIRCHMAIER leaves Mrs. Worsham at the Pewter Pot. 
ELIZABETH TIFFANY LORRAINE LaCOUR leaves shimmying for Harvard, 

Yale, Dartmouth and so forth. 
JODI LANDWEHR leaves the Kidd to the kids. 

FRANKIE LEOFF leaves at a gallop with Tim, Bruce, Eric, Carter, David, etc., etc. 
LAURA LOCKWOOD leaves memories of five letters a day to the envious undergrads. 
LEE McKALLAGAT leaves in her smoky Volkswagen for a trip to Zayers. 
MARDI PARKINSON leaves ZIGZagging down Rogers Street on the back of one 

of Harold's Hondas. 
LIZA PLIMPTON leaves "SLEEPily" to continue her quest for bigger and better 

things. 
CLAIRE SCANNELL leaves her empty place in gym to Jodi Tighe. 
KATIE (Hot Lips) SHEPARD leaves shouting her usual last words "Man, I've got 

something to tell you . . ." 
NANCY SMITH leaves her spirit and enthusiasm to all new girls. 
FAY-ZEE SUTTON leaves spouting her famous sayings and going through her 

imitations of Jimmy Hendrix. 
CYNTHIA (Cyn) TOMSU leaves an autographed gold disc of her favorite song 

"Me and Mv Shadow" to the RH archives. 
SHERRY WARNER leaves her philosophy that "it's better to be a rich man's darling 

than a poor man's slave" to all well brought up girls. 
DORRIS WILLIAMS leaves her family menus to John, the new chef. 
AMY WILSON leaves loaded down for Williamstown, extending an open invitation 

to all seniors who feel capable of handling it. 
KATHY WINTER leaves No-Dozing. 

TINA WRIGHT leaves her bottle tops to the undergrads for their mixers next year. 

Jodi Landwehr and the Staff 




I've got tO do SOMETHING 



Yoga the Bear 



They think I'm naive 




Guess what I'm thinking 



You think you've got troubles 



So who woke me up !? 




You are my sunshine 



For my career I'll do anything to 
lose ten pounds 



Who did you say was re-wiring 
the schodl? 




Wheel We're going out to lunch! Goody! Mommy bought me the Cloisters Well— another night on the town. 




Sideburns by Landwehr 



Oh Willard, do cool it 



Well, I said I'll do it tomorrow . . . 




big mouth is good for something 



What's to smile at? 



Down home they grow 'em big! 



SENIOR SONG 

Tune: "Moon River" 

June is here. 

Now we say goodbye. 

You know what you 

Have meant 

To us. 

Candles we lit, 
Friends by this flame; 
Together sharing 
Troubles and happiness. 

When we're gone, 

Friends we will remain. 

Graduation near 

To us, 

We hope we have helped 

As you have. 

Sisters we will be, 
Though sad we are 
To leave. 
Undergrads, 
Goodbye. 



Katharine Beers '68 
Elizabeth Fuller '68 





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Junior Class Officers 

President Marion Eddy 

Vice-President Estela Alvarez 





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Sophomore Class Officers 

Vice-President JoAnne Sweet 

President Kitty Wick 



Freshman Class Officers 

Vice-President Heather Russell 

President Wendy Hansen 







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I know the words better than 
Johnson does! 



It's all been haffening at 
this end of the hall . . . 



Huh?? 




Bag it, of course 



RH daytime action 



Cameras syeak louder than words 




So, what else is there to do? 



Do you think we can save 
this relationship? 




Aw shucks . 




I'm smiling . . 
but just you wait . 




Too many Romans spoil the grapes 



Who wants to grow up? 




Sign of the times? 



I'm a sunflower 



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Shall we dance? 



We're forming the funny club . . . 



UNDERGRADUATE SONG 

Tune: "Blue Moon" 

Senior Sisters, 

You came to us in September 

You lit our candles, remember 

And our friendship will always glow. 

The memories we'll always have together 
The helping hand you always gave us 
Will never be forgotten. 

When you walk down the aisle in June 
You'll be leaving R. H. forever 
But in our hearts you'll always remain 
A true friend and always a sister. 

We'll say goodby 
As you walk out the door 
But never ever forget us 
After you leave Rogers Hall 

— D. Pletscher and S. Ellington '69 



GOVERNMENT 




Student Council 
Seated: Miss Ramsay, Beers (President), DeBlois. 
Standing: Wright, Tomsu, Pollak, Pletscher. 




Student Proctors 
Kneeling: Eddy, Downey, Zinn, Green. 
Seated: Miss Ramsay, Beers (President), Martin, Sweet. 
Standing: Hall, Rowe, Washburn, Peck, Jones, Alvarez, Mcllvain, 
Warner, Fuller, Johnson. 



PUBLICATIONS 




Splinters 
Front: Downey, Lockwood (Art Editor), Bullock (Editor-in-Chief) Bacon 
(Business Manager), Landwehr, LaCour. 
Rear: Brion, Kirchmaier, Leoff, Warner, Scannell, Brohard, Wright, DeBlois. 




The Columns 
Front: Hemingway, Bell (Editor), Hall (Co-Editor), Foster. 
Rear: Keast, Pletscher, Sweet, Beck, Young, Alvarez, Anderson. 



MUSIC 




Glee Club 
Front: Eddy (Vice-President), Miss LeButt, Fuller (President). 

Second Row: Beers, Hall, Keast, Strasburg, Shipton, Sullivan, Pihl, Zinn, Mcllvain, Wick, 
Lefferts, Kirchmaier. 

Third Row Center: Tomsu, Innes, Mink, Knowles, Slimmon. 

Fourth Row Center: Rowe, Ingraham, Brohard, Sweet, Downey, Brion, Antonopoulos, Peck. 
Rear: Tatian, Winter, Bullock, Pletscher, Hemingway, Harvey, McKallagat, Foster, Martin, 
Sohier, Jones, Wilson, Pollak, Gadd, Anderson, Johnson, DeBlois, Perkins, Bacon. 




The R. H. Negatives 
Kneeling: Fuller, Rowe. 
Standing: Sutton, Mcllvain, Strasburg, 
Eddy, Wright. 
Tree-hof-ping: Innes (leader), Lockwood. 






Latin Club 
First Row: Mink, Sullivan, Knowl- 
es, Laing. 

Second Row: Saba, Tatian, Thom- 
as (Vice-President), Washburn 
(President), Miss Phelps (Advis- 
or), Ingraham. 

Third Row: Antonopoulos, Tikel- 
lis, Pletscher. 

Fourth Row: Beck, MacMannis, 
Shipton, Mellick, Nields. 





Photography Club 

Seated Front: Fuller, Mcllvain, Keast, Johnson. 

Second Row: Bell, Thomas, Alvarez, Sutton (President), Lefferts, Smith. 

Rear: Innes, Hemingway, Bullock, Wright (Co-President), Bloom, Beck, LaCour. 




French Club 
Front: McKallagat, Innes, Wick, Wilson, Jones, Brohard, Mrs. HoflFer, 
(Advisor). 

Rear: Drury, Harvey, Brion, Beers, Leoff, Plimpton E., DeBlois, 
Plimpton N., Scannell, Tomsu, Downey (President), LaCour, Land- 
wehr, Bell, absent— Tighe (Vice-President). 




Spanish Club 
Seated: Miss Pulling, (Advisor), Sutton, Shepard, Pollak, Fuller, Brown. 
Standing: Alvarez (Vice-President), Winter (President), Lefferts, Mack, 
Parkinson, Ellington K. 




Debate Club 
Front: Sutton, Alvarez, Parkinson (President), Brion (Co-President), 
Tikellis, Holihan. 
Rear: Warner, Doremus, Pletscher, Hall, Pollak, Tatian, Scannell. 




Ski Club 
Front: Foster, LaCour, Lape, Shepard, Vallis, Knowles. 

Rear: Waterman, Johnson, Sutton, Bacon, Harvey, Fuller, Laundon, Gadd (Vice- 
President), Smith (President), Tatian, Pletscher, Bullock, Martin, Nauss, Shipton. 




The Breakfast Club 
Left to right: Wilson, Kirchmaier, Bacon, Warner (President), Harvey (Vice- 
President), Smith, Shepard, Beers. 




Dramatics Club 
First Row: Brox, Anderson, Warner, Parkinson, Eddy (Vice-President), Mrs. 
Worsham (Advisor), Landwehr (President), Kinney, Hemingway, Smith, 
Pletscher, Laundon. 

Rear: Wilson, Scannell, Bullock, LaCour, Doremus, Mack C, Downey, DeBlois, 
Beers, Hall. 



CLUB MEMBERS ARE GROOVY 




Sand Skiing is, of course, 
the coolest . . . 




A trip to Hooker Howe 
might improve ■matters 



Have camera 
will travel 




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The sun does not shine on Dramatic Cluhies, and besides, we'll swear we wore hats! 



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Tfoe Columns is a stylish group 

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Breakfast Club is served first 
at Bill's Place 



To he editor-in-chief one 
must dress for the part. 




In singing, the position is all 




The Dramatic Club offers 
all kinds of opportunities. 




Likes her chair. 



In personal success or team play, nothing is 
more important than that ephemeral thing, spirit. 

— W. J. BOWERMAN 








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CAE Officers 

Amy Wilson, Vice-President 

Kate DeBlois, President 



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KAVA Officers 

Kim Kirchmaier, Vice-President 
Beth Fuller, President 



CAE 3 - KAVA 2 




CAE Hockey 

Front Row: Seller, Lefferts, Plimpton N. (Captain), Kinney, Peck. 
Second Row: Beers (Manager), Smith, Vallis, Anderson, Nields, 
Wilson, Pollak, Mcllvain, DeBlois (absent). 




KAVA Hockey 

Front Row: Green, Knowles, Kirchmaier (Captain), Shipton, Hemingway. 
Second Rota?: Williams, Strasburg, Templet, Keast, Alvarez, Thomas, Winter, 
LaCour, Tomsu (Manager). 



HOCKEY 





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Yogi says, "rah"! 



Wooden legs are "in" this year. 



Again this year the first team hockey game was held on Parents' Day. The spirit 
and enthusiasm from both sides ran high throughout the game. Although the defenses 
of both teams seemed impenetrable, a brief opening enabled Kate DeBlois, of CAB 
to score the first goal. KAVA rallied and sent Judy Knowles through to score. The 
second half followed the same pattern with CAE scoring a goal and KAVA returning 
with another. Thus, the game remained tied until the last few moments when 
CAE's Alida Mcllvain, assisted by Kate DeBlois broke through with the final goal, 
ending the game with a score of 3-2. 

The second team was also closely matched. The only two goals of the game were 
made during the first half, both by CAE, and the game ended 2-0. 







Second Teams 






CAE 






KAVA 


Brown 


Bullock 


Downey (Capt.) 


Brion 


Nauss 


Wick 


Drury 




Ellington, S 


Johnson (Capt.) 


Spring 


Martin 




Saba 


Plimpton, E. 


Gadd 


Young 




Washburn 


Eddy 


Perkins 


Pihl 




Hall 


Sutton 


Warner 


Waterman 




Wright 
Laundon 





Weeee are champs! 



Pst! Don't tell Willard 
the score . . . 



CAE 52 - KAVA 30 




CAE Volleyball 

Front Ro^v: Plimpton N., Seller, Spring, Nauss. 

Second Row: Nields, Anderson, Lefferts (Captain), Brohard (Manager), Bullock. 

On Bars: Slimmon, Pollak, Vallis, Mcllvain. 




KAVA Volleyball 

Left to Right: Alvarez, Laundon, LaCour, Shipton, Hemingway, Downey (Manager), 
Thomas (Captain), Winter, Kirchmaier, Wright, Tomsu. 



Volleyball 



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The first team volleyball game was held on January 11, 1968. Because it is the 
first indoor game, the volleyball game is inevitably characterized by extreme tension, 
great spirit and loud enthusiasm. This game was no exception. CAE was the first to 
serve and in the first half was able to accumulate twentv-nine points to KAVA's eleven. 
In the beginning of the second half KAVA began to shorten CAE's extreme lead, 
but CAE was able to push on to end the game 52-30. Alida Mcllvain of CAE was 
the high scorer of the game, totalling 18 points. 

The second team game, however, was much closer with a final score in favor of 
KAVA 36-30. Kathy Ellington held the highest total with nine points. 









Second Teams 










CAE 






KAVA 


Gadd 




Wilson (Captain) Leoff 




Ellington, 


Harvey 




Brown 


Brion 




Copeland 


Pletscher 




Juszczak 


Ellington, 


K. 


Knowles 


Bullock 




Bacon 


Strasburg 




Laing 


Plimpton, 


E. 


Kinney 


Pihl 




Hall 



S. (Captain) 





Tiring, isn't it? 



Volley folly 



CAE 38 - KAVA 19 




CAE Basketball 
Left to right: Plimpton N., Pollak, Spring, Vallis, Bullock (Captain), 
Kinney, Lefferts, Eddy. 




KAVA Basketball 

Left to Right: Wright (Manager), Brion, Winter, Kirchmaier, Knowles (Captain), 
Thomas, LaCour, Strasburg, Tomsu. 






Basketball Games 

On March 5, 1968 the two clubs met for the first team game. Though handicapped 
by many injuries both clubs were able to produce strong teams. 

The Red and White took an early lead and were able to hold though KAVA 
began to break through in the last half. The final score favored CAE Club 38-19. 
Tina Lefferts of CAE was the high scorer of the game with 18 points. 

The second team game, however, was more evenly matched and the game ended 
in a tie of 15-15. Sue Stewart totaled 14 points for KAVA. 







Second Teams 




CAE 




KAVA 




Anderson 


Juszczak 


Drury 


Leoff 


Brohard (Captain) 


Laing 


Fuller 


Martin 


Brown 


Nauss 


Hemingway (Captain) 


Stewart, S. 


DeBlois 


Shepard 


Keast 

Washburn for Fuller 


Waterman 





There used to be a ball 
in this game. 



Streetch 




At least Leo's in the basket 



CAE 27 - KAVA 17 




CAE Softball 
Kneeling: Eddv, DeBlois, Johnson (Captain), Spring, Gilbert, Seller. 
Standing: Brohard, Anderson, Plimpton N., Warner, Lefferts, Gadd, 
Pollak, Nauss, Brown. 




KAVA Softball 
First Rent': Waterman, Knowles, Hemingway, Shipton, Pihl, Keast, 



Strasburg, Brion. 



Second Row: Fuller, Wright, LaCour, Kirchmaier, Thomas, Drury, 
Martin, Jones (Manager). 



Softball Game 





Just call me "Yaz" 



How did I get into this 
ridiculous -position? 



Due to the brevity of the season and to various other activities the first and second 
teams were combined and only one game was held. 

The first six innings of the game were extremely exciting. They were highlighted 
by an unexpected slide from Laura Waterman and a number of home runs from 
Lorrie LaCour and Tina Lefferts. By the end of the sixth inning the game was tied 
13-13. However, CAE seemed to come alive in the seventh inning and though KAVA 
fought back the game ended in favor of CAE. 





Some comments are 
unprintable . . . 



Yes, the funniest people turn up 
in the funniest places . . . 



CUP WINNER - DONNA BRION (KAVA) 



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CAE Badminton 

Front: Spring, Vallis. 

Rear: Warner, Shepard (Manager), Nields. 



KAVA Badminton 
Front: Parkinson (Manager). 
Rear: Tomsu, Brion, LaCour, Shipton. 




TENNIS (INCOMPLETE) 



CAE Tennis 
Front: Vallis, Spring. 
Rear: Shepard (Manager), Lefferts, 
Plimpton N. 




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KAVA Tennis 
Left fo ngJ?t: Shipton, Downey, Brion, LaCour, Parkinson (Manager). 






KAVA 83 - CAE 80 




CAE Swimming 
Front Rcnv: Nields, Zinn, Gadd, Smith, Nauss. 
Second Row. Kinney, Peck, Warner, Bacon, Sutton, Lefferts. 




KAVA Swimming 
Front Row: Beck, Kirchmaier, Keast, Rowe, Hall, Waterman. 
Second Row: Wright, Thomas, Williams, Ingraham, Brion (Manager). 



CHEERLEADERS 




CAE Cheerleaders 
First Row: Warner (Mascot), Pletscher (Captain), Kinney (Mascot). 
Second Row: Juszczak, McKallagat, Peck, Harvey, Foster. 
Third Row: Nauss, Mcllvain, Lefferts, Vallis, Johnson. 




KAVA Cheerleaders 
Left to right: Shipton, MacMannis, Templet, LaFoley, Wright, Washburn 
(Captain), LaCour, Tikellis, Knowles, Pihl, Ellington, S. 
Center: Sweet (Mascot). 



He hath no leisure who useth it not. 

—George Herbert 



PARENTS' DAY 




Got a match? 



The gang is certainly here. 



O.K. now, who's got the puck? 



The Parents' Day Tradition, now one year old, became more firmly established 
on Saturday, November 4, 1967. The girls and their families enjoyed an eventful 
day, and everyone agrees that this is a great way to start off the year. 

After lunch at which the R. H. Negatives performed, the Parents' Association 
had its meeting. The girls anxiously waited for the start of the hockey game, which 
has become a part of the new tradition. Parents and some enthusiastic alumnae make 
a great grandstand and so the game has taken on an even more exciting air than usual. 
Spirited cheerleading punctuated the proceedings and humorous mascots amused the 
crowd. Of course the game was followed by the presentation of the cup to the winning 
team, CAE. 

There is no doubt that last year's experimental day has become a permanent part 
of the R.H. annual pattern. 




Ringside seat 



Let's cut out for Williamstown 
. . . or Concord. 



What do you see down there? 



FALL PLAYS 



Three one-act plays were presented on November 21, 1967. The 
first presentation was The Lost Elevator, a comedy by Percival Wilde. 
Jammed into the elevator, ingeniously created by Manuel, was a 
rare group of eleven characters. Jiffy Copeland played the amorous 
young man who paid the operator, humorously played by Joyce 
Fichera, to pretend the elevator was stuck so that he could force coy 
Jodi Landwehr to listen to his protestations of love. Every character 
was truly funny from Kate DeBlois' nosey old lady to Claire Scan- 
nell's fast-talking book salesman. 





Not Enough Rope bv the well-known contemporary actress Elaine May was 
RH's first attempt at a play of the Theatre of the Absurd type. On the surface, the 
play appears grotesquely humorous, but its serious message concerns man's need for 
human companionship, if not love. Sherry Warner did an exceptional job in her 
hanging scene, a vain attempt to capture the attention of her new neighbor, an 
insensitive drummer, played with just the right indifference by Sandy Beck. Betty 
Hall's old lady who demanded peace and quiet for her death scene added a wonderful 
combination of pathos and horror. 




In the third play, Hcmgs Over Thy Head by Ruth Angell Purkey, a nameless 
author, played authoritatively by Kathy Beers, has invited a group of actors to an. 
empty theatre for the reading of his play. He is in search of an ending, for its theme 
is the future of man: will he annihilate himself or learn to live in harmony'? We are 
left to wonder as the eerie sound of a civil defense alert spreads over the city. The 
play had a serious impact on the audience, but comic relief was provided by Debbie 
Pletscher's portrayal of a slightly overaged "star" and Isabel Kinney's ability to sustain 
the difficult role of an alcoholic "has-been". 



CHRISTMAS PLAY 




On December 14, 1967, the Dramatics Department presented an excellent per- 
formance of The Gift of Tenyin by John D. Tumpane. From the moment the audience 
directed their attention to the stage thev shared in the perfection of both acting and 
atmosphere. Great credit is owed to Mrs. Perloff's design and to Manuel's execution 
of the beautifully effective set representing the palace of the Emperor of Japan. 

The unique plot revolves around the Emperor's five daughters and their prepara- 
tion of presents for their father's birthdav. Tenvin, the least-favored daughter, 
plaved simply and delicatelv bv Linda Juszczak, gives a play which relates the coming 
of Christ. She directs her sisters, still in oriental dress, to act out the traditional 
Christmas parts while she narrates. 

Truda Bloom played the Emperor with just the right pomp and ceremony 
alternating with humor and tenderness. Marilvn Keast added touches of fun with, 
ber portrayal of the silly daughter while Bettv Sullivan was outstanding as the 
musical member of the family who sings a maudlin song reminding heT father that 
she is still unwed. Anne Hemingway and Susan Antonopoulos with their contrasting 
colorings made beautiful additions to the production. 

The audience seemed entranced with the unusual rendition of the Christmas 
story and many went away saying that this was RH's most impressive production. 



CHRISTMAS VESPERS 





The annual Christmas Vespers was held Sunday evening, December 10th. This 
is a special year at Rogers Hall and the 75th Christmas Vespers was run a little more 
informally. It took place in the gym with a fireplace setting. Katherine Beers, Presi- 
dent of the Student Council, was Mistress of Ceremonies. The program began with 
Christmas carols sung by the Spanish, French and Latin Clubs respectively. 

Several talented Dramatics Club members read Christmas pieces. Isabel Kinney 
recited a poem by Eugene Field— "Jes Before Christmas". Sherry Warner and Karen 
Anderson read The Littlest Angel, and Jodi Landwehr, President of Dramatics Club, 
read a short poem by Ernest Rhys called "A New Song". 

The Octet performed two carols, "A Solaing" and "Angels We Have Heard On 
High". The Glee Club entertained with their selection "Joy to the World". 

Then the most meaningful event of the evening arrived when Miss Ramsay 
presented the seniors with their rings. 

The enjovable evening concluded with "O Little Town of Bethlehem" sung by 
all. 




SPRING PLAYS 

Following the pattern of the last few years, the spring plays were experimental 
in that some were presented in-the-round— that is, on the gym floor with the audience 
on three sides of the performing platforms. The five plays varied in tone and theme 
and made Thursday night, March 14, a memorable one. 




Lord Byron's Love Letter by Tennessee Williams opened the program. The play, 
presented in the round, concerns a sight-seeing couple from Milwaukee, played by a 
domineering Sandy Beck and a happily alcoholic Marian Eddy, who have come to 
New Orleans to celebrate the Mardi Gras. The couple stumble onto two women who 
claim to have an original love letter from Lord Byron and who manage to exist on 
the proceeds of donations from tourists anxious to hear the tantalizing contents. 
Debbie Pletscher had the taxing role of the old maid daughter who conducts the 
reading while Kate DeBlois stole the show from behind the curtain where she sat as 
the quarrelsome hag for the larger portion of the play. 




The Twelve-Pound Look, a famous one-act play by J. M. Barrie was a challenge 
to the RH cast. Betty Hall played her role of Kate, former grand lady turned typist, 
with skill and sincerity. Both Betty's quality of voice and her ability to develop a role 
were well displayed. She and Truda Bloom as the pompous Sir Harry, Kate's former 
husband, sustained a long, difficult scene very well. Linda Juszczak made a lovely 
second Lady Sims and Mary Thomas had great dignity as the butler. The set was 
quite elegant in tones of pale pink and white, especially with the addition of furniture 
stolen from various parts of the Hall. 



SPRING PLAYS 




The Lost Silk Hat by Lord Dunsany was presented by the Dramatics Club. For 
a first student directed play, our hats are off to Sherry Warner. The plot of the play 
revolves around a young man who, after a quarrel, has left his silk hat at the house 
of the woman he loves. The scene is played outside the house as he tries to talk various 
passersby into retrieving his silk hat. As the play ends we know that the young man 
will go into the house himself to get both his hat and his woman. Kathy Beers played 
the distraught young man with confidence while Karen Anderson carried the difficult 
role of the poet with much skill. Humor was added by Jan Laundon's mystified laborer 
and Pam Bell's fussy businessman. 




The Drapes Come is a highly original work by a young modem playwright, 
Charles Dizenzo. Sherry Warner was acclaimed for her performance of a mother 
whose personality alternated from sweet and lovely to coarse and ugly as did that of 
her teenage daughter, played strikingly by Marilyn Keast. The mother is waiting for 
the new living room drapes, materialistic svmbols that mean little after they are 
acquired. The play ends with the hanging of the drapes which plunge the room and 
their lives into darkness and suffocation. The dialogue suggests a whole spectrum of 
problems between parents and children. The RH audience seemed somewhat stunned 
by the proceedings on stage and torn between hilarity and horror. 



SPRING PLAYS 



The last play of the evening was Thornton Wilder's The Happy Journey which 
conveyed a message of family sentiment and solidarity. Isabel Kinney who played 
the young son with disarming innocence, evoked much laughter in her scene of 
repentence for minor blasphemy. The mother, strongly played by Toni Pollak, 
bound the family together and reminded us of the importance of the role of mother- 
hood. The charm of the play lay in its simplicity enhanced by the Wilder touch of 
no scenery to clutter the message. 



COMMENCEMENT PLAY 

On Monday evening, June 3rd, Rogers Hall presented The Madwoman of 
Chaillot by Jean Giraudoux, adapted bv Maurice Valency. This wonderfully philo- 
sophic comedv takes place in a French cafe and in the cellar apartment of Countess 
Aurelia, the Madwoman of Chaillot, who rules the little people of Paris. The 
Countess, played very skillfully by the versatile Sherry Warner, is under the illusion 
that the world is beautiful and happy until her friends, led by the Ragpicker, 
gallantly portrayed by Isabel Kinney, decide to tell her the truth. When she learns 
that the evil ones have taken over, she proceeds to wipe them out. 

With the help of her many friends the Countess lures all the greedy, dishonest 
members of society into her cellar where the sewerman, played humorously by Sandy 
Beck, has revealed to her a secret passageway leading nowhere. She practices a mild 
deception and tells the "bad guys" that there is oil at the end of the passage. Thus, in 
the course of an afternoon's work, she frees the world of evil and makes way for 
goodness and love. 

This is a superb play for character studies and the girls rose to the various 
challenges. Truda Bloom, with her famous prospector's nose, did a fine job, as did 
Pam Bell, Marion Eddy, and Cindy Brox as sophisticated representatives of capitalism. 
And, of course, the other three madwomen were truly outstanding: Betty Hall made 
a very complete characterization of Madame Constance and her imaginary dog 
Dickie (who became real at the curtain call); Jodi Landwehr simpered and smiled 
as the virginal Gabrielle; and Kathy Beers, playing a woman at last, interpreted 
Madame Josephine in a very humorous tight-lipped fashion and presided over the 
mock trial with regal grandeur. 



COMMENCEMENT PLAY 




Mrs. PerlofFs sets, especially the eerie cellar, which she painted single-handedly, 
were excellent. Roger Collins, our new right-hand man, contributed many fine ideas, 
particularly the creation of an awning for the cafe. The very professional sound effects 
completed one of the most nearly perfect R.H. major productions. 



Cast of 

The Waiter Jan Laundon 

The Little Man Claire Scannell 

The Prospector Truda Bloom 

The President Pamela Bell 

The Baron Cynthia Brox 

Therese Pamela Tikellis 

The Street Singer Georgia Innes 

The Flower Girl Ann Hemingway 

The Ragpicker Isabella Kinney 

Paulette Johanna Tighe 

The Deaf-Mute Elizabeth Laing 

Irma Linda Juszczak 

The Shoelace Peddler Lee McKallagat 

The Broker Marion Eddy 

Dr. Jadin Deborah Pletscher 

Countess Aurelia, the 
Madwoman of Chaillot .... Sherrill Warner 



Characters 

The Doorman Mary Thomas 

The Policeman Amelia Rowe 

Pierre Marilyn Keast 

The Sergeant Toni Pollak 

The Sewerman Sandra Beck 

Mme. Constance Elizabeth Hall 

Mme. Gabrielle Jodi Landwehr 

Mme. Josephine Katharine Beers 

The Presidents Kathryn Kirchmaier 

and Kathleen McCartin 

The Prospectors Genevieve Copeland 

and Jennifer Foster 

The Press Agents Katharine Harvey, 

Robin La Foley and Lynne Tatian 

The Ladies Elizabeth Bullock, 

Carol Gadd and Alida Mcllvain 




FOUNDER'S DAY - THE 75th ANNIVERSARY 




Registration on May 1 1 was the beginning of the biggest event of the year— thd 
Seventy-fifth Anniversary celebration of Rogers Hall. As soon as the parents and 
talumnae had gathered around the hockey field, the carefully planned program 
commenced. Elizabeth Rogers alias Isabel Kinney returned on her bicycle to lead the 
rest of the student body down the field. These students were clothed in gym outfits 
representing various eras at Rogers Hall. Diverse track and field events followed 
after which CAE Club and KAVA Club sang their songs. The morning activities were 
concluded when Mrs. Margaret Wood, the first President of KAVA Club, awarded 
the Field Day Cup to CAE Club. 

Preceding the scheduled luncheon, the alumnae gathered at MacGay. The 
unveiling of the portrait of Mrs. Katherine Whitten MacGay and the dedication of 
the Larmon Room took place. Entertainment by the Octet and the Rogers Hall Glee 
Club made lunch under the big tent an enjoyable occasion. Several speeches brought 
the festivities of the day to a close. 

Mrs. MacGay spoke about past humorous events, the people who had helped 
her through her years as headmistress including our beloved Manuel, and the fact 
that she hoped Rogers Hall would remain always under the direction of a woman. 
Miss Ramsay gave citations to ten outstanding graduates who, in her opinion, had 
fulfilled Elizabeth Rogers' maxim "she hath done what she could", among them 
Patsy West, '65 who works for the Pearl Buck Foundation in Korea. 




FATHER-DAUGHTER DAY 




The fathers, most of whom had spent the day attending the ceremonies of the 
Seventy-fifth Anniversary celebration, returned to Rogers Hall for the Father-Daughter 
Dance. While the orchestra took a brief intermission, the daughters entertained the 
fathers by performing skits and singing. Also at this time the Octet, led by Georgia 
Innes '68, demonstrated its talented performing abilities. The fathers all agreed that 
the dance was "groovy" and enjoyed getting into the swing of things. 





SPRING DANCE 

This year, instead of Senior Prom, a small informal gathering took place at 
MacGay. Because of the persisting rain, pool, ping pong and the Larmon Room, 
became great attractions throughout the day. 

That evening, the only signs of spring appeared when the dance began in 
MacGay 's paper garden. The music was supplied bv an excellent band from Lowell. 

Sunday, the weather improved slightly. Breakfast was served in MacGay at 
9:30. The guests left at 12:00 as promptly as they had arrived, leaving behind them 
a thoroughly exhausted dance committee. 




As chaferones we get to 
say flenty . . . 





Flower children. 



In my stocking feet 
1 do hetter. 



CLASS DAY AWARDS 



1968 



CLUB CUPS 

Hockey CAE 

Volleyball CAE 

Basketball CAE 



Softball CAE 

Swimming KAVA 

Badminton KAVA 



INDIVIDUAL AWARDS 

Badminton Donna Brion 

Posture Katherine Beers 



R. H. AWARDS . . . Given to those who have earned a total of seventy or more 

points in one vear. Points are given for athletic ability, sports- 
manship, captains, managers, Founder's Day, posture and 
neatness as well as cheer-leading. 
CAE KAVA 

Charlotte Brohard Betsy Nauss Donna Brion Lorraine LaCour 

Suzanne Johnson Nicola Plimpton Marilyn Keast Susan Shipton 

Isabella Kinney Toni Pollak Kathrvn Kirchmaier Cynthia Tomsu 

Christina Lefferts Susan Spring Judith Knowles Mary Thomas 

Vanessa Vallis Christina Wright 



NEATNESS AWARDS 

Hall Estela Alvarez - Toni Pollak 

MacGay 

First Floor Elizabeth Hall - Mary Thomas 

Second Floor Judith Knowles - Margaret Mink 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF CLUB OFFICERS FOR NEXT YEAR 
CAE KAVA 

President Deborah Pletscher President Dania Doremus 

Vice-President Suzanne Johnson Vice-President Ann Hemingway 

Cheerleader Betsy Nauss Cheerleader Martha Pihl 



COMMENCEMENT 

Baccalaureate 
The Rogers Hall commencement exercises began Sunday morning, June 2, at All 
Souls Church. The Reverend Joseph Simone gave an excellent dissertation on the 
decisions which one must make in life and he referred specifically to the drug problems 
of today. After the service a lovely reception was held by the church parishioners for 
the seniors and their families. 

Musicale 
The Musicale, performed on Sunday afternoon, included various selections by 
the Glee Club and several songs by the Octet. In the Glee Club, solos were done 
by Amelia Rowe in "Try to Remember", and Toni Pollak, Lynn Tatian, Ellen Peck 
and Debbie Pletscher in "When the Foeman Bears his Steel", a selection from the 
Gilbert and Sullivan operetta "The Pirates of Penzance". Afterwards, punch was 
served for the guests and the singers. 

Senior Luncheon 
On Monday the Senior Luncheon was given and the seniors found their places 
at Miss Ramsav's table with the help of tiny replicas of the front gate which bore 
their names. During the meal the humorously revealing verses prepared by the 
undergrads were read and bouquets were given to the seniors who had survived four 
years at Rogers Hall. 

Class Day 
The Class Day exercises began with the awarding of the athletic prizes by Miss 
Ramsay and Miss Bowes. Following the awards, announcements of the new club 
officers were made bv the present officers. The class prophecv and will were read by 
Beth Bullock and Jodi Landwehr, respectively. The activities came to a close with 
the singing of the undergrad and senior songs. 

Graduation 

The actual graduation ceremony took place on Tuesday, the fourth of June. 
The day began and ended rather grimly with much fog and rain but between 9:30 
and 12:00 the weather was beautiful. 

At 9:30 the seniors, displaying their dresses for the first time, formed a receiving 
line in the drawing rooms. At 10:00, for the last time, the senior class marched into 
the gvmnasium to the tune of "Pomp and Circumstance". The address to the senior 
class was given by The Reverend A. Graham Baldwin, D.D., former School Minister 
of Phillips Academy at Andover, Massachusetts. He, both humorously and effectively, 
stressed the importance of true love and friendship in life. He carefully explored 
the ingredients of true love: truth, tenderness, and patience. Mr. Baldwin's warm 
sincerity in his references to his own family life made us hope that we might also 
achieve his kind of fulfillment in our future. 

Dr. David Latham, President of the Board of Trustees, presented the diplomas 
after which Charlotte Brohard, President of the Senior Class, presented the school 
with a water color painting, a lovely winter scene by Dr. Harry Senger. Miss Ramsay 
then accepted the gift and awarded the school honors. Following the school song 
and the Benediction the seniors marched out to form a floral arc with their roses. 
Smiling through their tears, the undergrads said goodbye and wished luck to the 
seniors. But this was not the last they will see of their true friends, who will surely 
return to their high school scene. 



AWARDS AND HONORS - 1968 



UNDERHILL HONOR - COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Charlotte Brohard 

PARSONS HONOR - GENERAL COURSE 
Place Downev 



HONOR ROLL - AVERAGE 85% or above 



Estela Alvarez 
Karen Anderson 
Susan Antonopoulos 
Charlotte Brohard 



Sen 



lor 



Place Downey 
Deborah Drury 
Marion Eddy 
Jennifer Foster 
Linda Juszczak 

HELEN HILL AWARD 

Cynthia Tomsu 

ATHLETIC AWARD 
Donna Brion 

ART PRIZE 

Elizabeth Bullock 

ART SURVEY AWARDS 

Place Downey Undergraduate 



Francine Leoff 
Nancy Nields 
Pamela Saba 
Cynthia Tomsu 



Betsy Nauss 



DRAMATICS 

Sherrill Warner 
For her ability to recognize the purpose of playing: 
"to hold as t'were the mirror uf to nature." 
Honorable Mention 



Katherine Beers 
Truda Bloom 
Elizabeth Hall 



Karen Anderson 
Susan Antonopoulos 
Genevieve Copeland 



Seni 



mors 



Lindsay Bacon 
Donna Brion 



Linda Juszczak 
Marilyn Keast 
Isabella Kinney 

MUSIC APPRECIATION 

Place Downey 

Honorable Mention 

Ellen Green 

Ann Hemingway 

Marilyn Keast 

CURRENT EVENTS 
Amy Wilson Undergraduates 

Honorable Mention 
Katherine Ellington 
Toni Pollak 



Jodi Landwehr 
Deborah Pletscher 
Toni Pollak 



Deborah Pletscher 
Elizabeth Sullivan 
Deborah Zinn 

Lynn Tatian 



Mary Thomas 
Sherrill Warner 



KATHARINE WHITTEN MacGAY LITERARY PRIZES 

Seniors Elizabeth Bullock . . An whose work we see the search for a 

way "to he the pilot of sunsets, to he the 
fearless 'til dawn . . ." 
Honorable Mention 
Donna Brion Georgia Innes 

Undergraduates Elizabeth Strasburg . . . Whose work reaches out to "touch hea- 
ven's height of reflection". 



ALVAREZ, Estela, 85-11 Avon Street, Jamaica, New York 

ANDERSON, Karen, 29 Daniels Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

ANTONOPOULOS, Susan, 3 Hemlock Drive, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

BACON, Lindsay, 1127 Ranfield Lane, Flint, Michigan 

BALLENTINE, Bonnie, Kohinka Hill, Wolfeboro, New Hampshire 

BECK, Sandra, 4 Rustic Drive, Cohasset, Massachusetts 

BEERS, Katharine, 214 Southdown Road, Huntington, Long Island, New York 

BELL, Pamela, 83 Beacon Street, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

BLOOM, Truda, 27 Dewey Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

BRION, Donna, Skunks Misery Road, Locust Valley, Long Island, New York 

BROHARD, Charlotte, 73 Weeks Avenue, Cornwall-on-Hudson, New York 

BROWN, Susan, 56 Monadnock Road, Wellesley Hills, Massachusetts 

BROX, Cvnthia, 192 North Lowell Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

BULLOCK, Elizabeth, P. O. Box #243, Johnsonville, South Carolina 

CHERNIN, Gail, 1000 West Avenue, Forte Towers Apartments, Apartment #1125, 

Miami Beach, Florida 
COPELAND, Genevieve, R. D. #1, Box #448, Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania 
DeBLOIS, Katherine, Fairhaven Hill, Concord, Massachusetts 
DOREMUS, Dania, South Road, Harwinton, Connecticut 
DOWNEY, Place, 3476 Jackson Street, San Francisco, California 
DRURY, Deborah, Spook Hollow Road, Far Hills, New Jersey 
EDDY, Marion, 20 Edbert Drive, NeW Britain, Connecticut 
ELLINGTON, Katherine, 424 Ocampo Drive, Pacific Palisades, California 
ELLINGTON, Susan, 424 Ocampo Drive, Pacific Palisades, California 
FICHERA, Joyce, 51 Hidden Road, Andover, Massachusetts 
FOSTER, Jennifer, 80 State Street, Ellsworth, Maine 
FULLER, Elizabeth, 511 Mapleton Avenue, Suffield, Connecticut 
GADD, Carol, 23 Stoner Drive, West Hartford, Connecticut 
GILBERT, Emilv, 275 Booth Avenue, Englewood, New Jersey 
GREEN, Ellen, 71 1 Hi Mount Road, Palm Beach, Florida 
HALL, Elizabeth, 345 Nahant Road, Nahant, Massachusetts 
HANSEN, Wendy, 545 Oakshore Drive, Winthrop Harbor, Illinois 
HARVEY, Katharine, 2025 Gratiot Avenue, Saginaw, Michigan 
HEMINGWAY, Ann, 81 Glenbrook Drive, Cheshire, Connecticut 
HOLIHAN, Elizabeth, 68 Salem Street, Andover, Massachusetts 
HOLIHAN, Felicity, 68 Salem Street, Andover, Massachusetts 
INGRAHAM, Nancy, 90 High Farma Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 
INNES, Georgia, 93 Edwards Lane, Atherton, California 
JOHNSON, Suzanne, Dingletown Road, Greenwich, Connecticut 
JONES, Deborah, 2 Whynwood Road, Simsbury, Connecticut 

JUSZCZAK, Linda, 289 Plymouth Drive, c/o Joseph Tower, Freehold, New Jersey 
KEAST, Marilyn, 45 Three Ponds Road, Wayland, Massachusetts 
KINNEY, Isabella, 401 Summer Street, Manchester, Massachusetts 
KIRCHMAIER, Kathryn, 28683 East River Road, Perrysburg, Ohio 
KNOWLES, Judith, Cumberland Foreside, Portland, Maine 
LaCOUR, Lorraine, 15 Hillside Road, New London, Connecticut 
LaFOLEY, Robin, Liberty Square Road, Boxboro, Massachusetts 
LAING, Elizabeth, Huckleberry Lane, Greenwich, Connecticut 
LANDWEHR, Jodi, 98 South Division, Holland, Michigan 
LAPE, Kristen, 132 Chadwick Street, Portland, Maine 



LAUNDON, Jan, Sachem's Head, Guilford, Connecticut 

LEFFERTS, Christina, 292 Washington Boulevard, Springfield, Massachusetts 

LEOFF, Francine, 1 1 George Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

LINDSAY, Caren, 4393 Carter Road, Fairport, New York 

LOCKWOOD, Laura, 79 Eastway, Mount Kisco, New York 

MACK, Cynthia, 178 Seven Bridge Road, Chappaqua, New York 

MACK, Elizabeth, 119 Holyrood Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

MacMANNIS, Barbara, 1 1 Overbrook Lane, Darien, Connecticut 

MARTIN, Wendy, 72 North Street, Grafton, Massachusetts 

McCANN, Maureen, Route #5, Box #59, Wayzata, Minnesota 

McCARTIN, Kathleen, 181 Belmont Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

McILVAIN, Alida, 1109 Beech Road, Rosemont, Pennsylvania 

McKALLAGAT, Lee, 135 Academy Road, North Andover, Massachusetts 

MELLICK, Helen, Far Hills, New Jersey 

MINK, Margaret, Norfolk Road, Litchfield, Connecticut 

NAUSS, Betsy, 84 Greenacres Avenue, Scarsdale, New York 

NIELDS, Nancy, Monument Street, Concord, Massachusetts 

PARKINSON, Martha, Box #278, Cotuit, Massachusetts 

PECK, Ellen, Yellow Cote Road, Oyster Bay, Long Island, New York 

PERKINS, Raleigh, 658 Black Rock Road, Bryn Maw, Pennsylvania 

PIHL, Martha, 135 East 7th Street, Hinsdale, Illinois 

PLETSCHER, Deborah, 1647 Gratiot Street, Saginaw, Michigan 

PLIMPTON, Eliza, Old Sudbury Road, South Lincoln, Massachusetts 

PLIMPTON, Nicola, Old Sudbury Road, South Lincoln, Massachusetts 

POLLAK, Toni, 63 Atlantin Avenue, Apartment #5 D, Boston, Massachusetts 

ROWE, Amelia, 1418 Rose Virginia Road, Reading, Pennsylvania 

RUSSELL, Heather, Battle Avenue, Castine, Maine 

SABA, Pamela, 20 Havilah Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

SCANNELL, Claire, 131 Holyrood Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

SELLER, Jane, 789 Colrain Road, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

SHEPARD, Katharine, 125 Hillside Road, Kensington, Connecticut 

SHIPTON, Susan, 953 Prospect Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

SLIMMON, Betsey, 555 Hill Farm Road, Fairfield, Connecticut 

SMITH, Nancy, Manley Street, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

SOHIER, Elaine, 4507 Crest Lane, McLean, Virginia 

SPRING, Susan, 4 Elm Street, Concord, Massachusetts 

STEWART, Barbara, 5 Haven Drive, Andover, Massachusetts 

STRASBURG, Elizabeth, 6671 MacArthur Boulevard, Washington, D.C. 

SULLIVAN, Elizabeth, 76 Westford Street, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

SUTTON, Fay, Cousins Island, Yarmouth, Maine 

SWEET, Jo Anne, 494 North Main Street, Gloversville, New York 

TATIAN, Lynne, 57 Lexington Avenue, Bradford, Massachusetts 

TEMPLET, Suzanne, Dover Road, Box #208, Guilford, Maine 

THOMAS, Mans 109 Overhill Road, Baltimore, Maryland 

TIGHE, Johanna, 23 Holyrood Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

TIKELLIS, Pamela, 19 Perth Drive, Wilmington, Delaware 

TOMSU, Cynthia, 3180 Gratiot Avenue, Port Huron, Michigan 

VALLIS, Vanessa, 109 Lowell Street, Lvnnfield, Massachusetts 

WARNER, Sherrill, 33 Cove Circle, Marion, Massachusetts 

WASHBURN, Anne, Red Stone Hill, Plainville, Connecticut 



WATERMAN, Laura, 99 Flat Rock Road, Easton, Connecticut 
WICK, Kathleen, 35 West Cedar Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
WILLIAMS, Dorris, 1219 Andover Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
WILSON, Amy, 7 Prospect Street, Williamstown, Massachusetts 
WINTER, Katharine, 60 South Main Street, Suffield, Connecticut 
WRIGHT, Christina, Groton School, Groton, Massachusetts 
YOUNG, Anne, 45 East 72nd Street, New York, New York 
ZINN, Deborah, Ballwood Road, Old Greenwich, Connecticut 



FACULTY 

RAMSAY, Miss Hildred, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

CROSBIE, Mrs. Barbara, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

JONES, Mrs. Frances, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

STATEN, Mrs. Louise, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

ALEXANDER, Miss Doris, c/o L. D. Alexander, R.D. Box #229, Constantia, N. Y. 

BOWES, Miss Carol, 2 Tupelo Road, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

BUIS, Miss Barbara, 58 Nanepashmet Street, Marblehead Neck, Massachusetts 

HABER, Miss Diane, 19 Euston Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 

HAYNES, Miss Mary, 172 West College Street, Oberlin, Ohio 

HOFFER, Mrs. Edward, 40 Jamaica Way, Apartment #9, Boston, Massachusetts 

JONES, Mrs. Agnes, 20 Fenwick Drive, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

LATOUR, Mrs. Edward, 202 Parkview Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

LeBUTT, Miss Dorothy, 144 Pine Street, Portland, Maine 

MILLER, Mrs. Ray, 28 Gerson Terrace, Lowell, Massachusetts 

PERLOFF, Mrs. John, 162 Linmoor Terrace, Lexington, Massachusetts 

PHELPS, Miss Dorothy, 44 High Street, R.F.D., Norwell, Massachusetts 

PHINNEY, Mrs. Roland, 29 South Walker Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

PULLING, Miss Anne, 17 Louisburg Square, Boston, Massachusetts 

ROBINSON, Miss Carol, 73 Raven Road, Lowell, Massachusetts 

SADOWSKI, Mrs. Judith, 45 George Road, Winchester, Massachusetts 

SARGENT, Mrs. Marjorie, Ogunquit, Maine 

SCALISE, Rev. Victor, 222 Liberty Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

SWANN, Miss Grace, 61 Nesmith Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

TALBOT, Mrs. Charles, 112 Clark Road, Lowell, Massachusetts 

WORSHAM, Mrs. Banks, Partridge Lane, Carlisle, Massachusetts 



ARVEDSON, Mrs. Joseph, Chateau Touraine, Scarsdale, New York 
BENTLEY, Mrs. Charlotte, 15 John Turco Drive, c/o William Thurlow, 

Walpole, Massachusetts 
CALHOUN, Mrs. Barbara, 30 Worthen Street, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 
COLPITTS, Mrs. Stephen, 18 Winter Street, Plymouth, New Hampshire 
CONGER, Rev. George H., R.F.D. #1, Trapelo Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts 
GEISSLER, Mrs. Gary, 3241 Martha Custis Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 
LANDIS, Miss Janet, 2244 Hobson Road, Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
DOWNS, Mrs. Francis, 8 Kirk Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 
KAYE, Mrs. Sanford, 4 Florence Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 



LAST MINUTE 




Swingers . . . 



Now add a little sand . . 



MEMORIES 




Anything for the cause. 



Haffy little demonstration 




One 



Two 



Wheel 





Who's dancing with whom? 



r 

Of course, I'm a serious 
tyfe . . . 






TREE PLANTING 



May 9, 1 968 

(dedicated in memory of Manuel Furtado 
by the Dramatics Club) 

The dark time 

The time of despair 

of deep distrust of the power of good 

has passed 

as we knew it would . . . 

in that far part of our minds . . . 

even then 

in deep winter 

when seared senses sealed off 

the possibility of rebirth 

of soft earth 

and warm sun. 

The bright time 

The time of hope 

of belief in the power of renewal 

has come. 

Now the earth is turned 

and the seed nurtured . . . 

The roots already reach for life . . . 

And we rejoice that 

we may join here 

in deep spring 

to give life 

to memory. 






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Spring Number 

Nineteen Hundred and Sixty-nine 




nters 



Pamela Bell 
Elizabeth Hall 



Cynthia Brox 
Susanne Johnson 
Linda Juszczak 



Dania Doremus 



Editor-in-Chief 
Alida McIlvain 

Literary Board 



Elizabeth Holihan 
Lisa Strasburg 



Lynne Tatian 

Business Board 
Manager— Karen Anderson 



Marion Eddy 
Amelia Rowe 

Anne Washburn 



Art Editor— Betsy Nauss 
Staff 



Marilyn Keast 



Truda Bloom 
Nancy Dewey 
Frances Grynkraut 
Judith Knowles 

Truda Bloom 



Art and Photography Contributors 

Kristen Lape 



Informal Photographers 



Martha Pihl 
Lisa Strasburg 
Joanne Sweet 

Estela Alvarez 



Vacuity Literary Advisor 
Mrs. Dorothy A. Worsham 



Faculty Art Advisor 
Mrs. Dorothy I. Perloff 



Table of Contents 



4. 
5. 
6. 



7. 



9. 



10. 



11. 



12. 

13. 
14. 
15. 



16. 

17. 

18. 

19. 

20. 
21. 
22. 



23. 

24. 
25. 
26. 



The Egyptian Child Lisa Strashurg 

Scratchboard Marilyn Keast 

Stalemate Susan Aubin 

Ink Drawing Marilyn Keast 

Shamar Linda Juszczak 

dependability e. hall 

Photograph Lisa Strashurg 

The Roots of Contemporary 

Violence Lie in Affluence Marion Eddy 

Collage Betsy Nauss 

Cinquain Amelia Rowe 

Search for Tomorrow Lynne Tatian 

Pain Kristen Lafe 

Passage Wendy Martin 

Scratchboard Betsy Nauss 

I was . . . and I shouldn't 

have been Barbara MacMannis 

The Sacrifice Elizabeth Hall 

Advice to Those on the Brink Toni Pollak 

Plea a la Vis-Ed Lynne Tatian 

Pencil Drawing Betsy Nauss 

A Flying Thing Wendy Martin 

Prophecy Susan Aubin 

Maxim Deborah Pletscher 

Photograph Truda Bloom 

Nativity Deborah Evans 

Christmas Cheer Ann Hemingway 

Collage Kristen Lafe 

Communion Pamela Bell 

Graphically Speaking Elizabeth Hall 

A Thought Kathleen Sullivan 

Projection Barbara Gray 

Photograph Lisa Strashurg 

Painting Marilyn Keast 

Lesson Emily Gilbert 

Quest Wendy Hansen 

Ink Drawing Dania Doremus 

You Kristen Lafe 

A Trip Susan Aubin 

Watercolor Frances Grynkraut 

Someday Jody Blain 

Collage Dania Doremus 

Definition Nancy Dewey 

Photograph Lisa Strashurg 



27. 

28. 
29. 
30. 

31. 



32. 
33. 



34. 

35. 

36. 

37. 

38. 

39. 
40. 

41. 

42. 
43. 
44. 
45. 
46. 
47. 
48. 

49. 

50-57. 



The Trap Susan Aubin 

Epitome of Life Ann Hemingway 

Two Poems Lisa Strashurg 

Acryllic Painting Marilyn Keast 

Surf Nicola Plimfton 

Pen and Ink Betsy Nauss 

The Beginning Alida Mcllvain 

Stones Susan Aubin 

Reverie Amelia Rowe 

Photograph Lisa Strashurg 

Un Reve .* Ann Hemingway 

L'Aube Elizabeth Holihan 

Son Coeur Alida Mcllvain 

Desespoir Kitty Wick 

Once Ivory Infant Pamela Bell 

Pen and Ink Betsy Nauss 

Perched on the Palm of Boredom .... Lynne Tatian 

Old Friends j Nancy Dewey 

In the Eating Place Dania Doremus 

Violence Louisa Reffucci 

Collage Dania Doremus 

Space Odyssev Ann Hemingway 

Photograph Truda Bloom 

City #13 Wendy Martin 

Truth Pamela Bell 

Creative Paper Martha Pihl 

The Weary Days Kitty Wick 

The Drapes Truda Bloom 

Lily White Pamela Bell 

Flashback Anne Loring 

Oil Painting Marilyn Keast 

He Susan Aubin 

Dear Past 

and Painting Kristen Lafe 

Creative Paper Judith Knowles 

Willie Toni Pollak 

Pen and Ink Nancy Dewey 

Almost Elaine Sohier 

Pen and Ink Joanne Sweet 

Once Again Susan Torrey 

Moods Alida Mcllvain 

Departure Kristen Lafe 

When I Was Ten Susan Aubin 

Pen and Ink Marilyn Keast 

Photograph Lisa Sirasburg 

Pcem and Photographs Lisa Strashurg 



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Stalemate 

The flowers dropped 
The leaves rotted 
The seeds had spread 
To cover the dead. 



Sue Aubin 71 




ifeter 



Shamar 

The sand races across the street and leaves swirl until snagged in the skeleton of 
a bush. You breathe in short gasps and your world is smothered in a deep orange; 
the stinging wind and withering heat attack you. In time an eerie calm setdes and 
dust layers your world. Time has stopped and you are part of a monocromatic painting. 



Linda Juszczak '69 



dependability 



where is it 

can i find it in the sky 
the sea 
the sun 
can i find it in my friend 
my love 
mv enemy 
can i find it in my senses 
my body 
my mind 
once a flower bloomed patiently 

for the sun to bake away 
for the wind to push afar 
once i was loved 

but something new came 
something unknown to me 
once i knew myself 

but confusion overcame 
wrinkling my temples 
what is the design of dependability 



E. HALL '69 




The Roots of Contemporary Violence 
Lie in Affluence 

"I want to give my kids all the things we could never afford when I was growing 
up." Yes, and our parents seem to have accomplished their goal. Today's youth has or 
will soon have a car, acquires all the clothes he needs or wants, eats as much as he 
may or may not need, goes to the "club" or the "beach" where he signs the check 
with Dad's name, goes to the best school, and has an allowance that would pay for a 
yacht. Of course, he might decide to get a job, not to help his family, but to pay for 
a ski trip or the new '69 stereo tape for his car. 

It's quite obvious that a good percentage of our generation is growing up in an 
atmosphere of affluence. Money is being handed to us on a real silver platter, and in 
the perverse nature of youth, many of us are literally running from money. Even 
those of us who have not gone to the extreme of joining a hippie community feel the 
inclination to wear old ragged clothes and to attempt to live in hovels built by our 
own hands. The object is to build a society where money isn't the main issue; instead, 
the individual and what he thinks are the focus. 

This "individual" includes people of all races, religions, and economic brackets. 
Each one professes to want to be able to stand up and call himself a man, to declare 
himself free of false, materialistic values. Unfortunately he often meets hostility in 
pursuing his way of life and comes to believe that he must fight hostility with hos- 
tility; that his philosophy of individual freedom can only be acknowledged through 
violent means. 

Perhaps one of the most ironic facts of this time in history is that those 
who are fighting hardest for spiritual freedom are frequently those who have had 
the most wealth and opportunity. They are the ones who have had all the material- 
istic things they could ever want and now are reaching out through any means, 
violent or otherwise, to reestablish their values. 

Marion Eddy '69 




Cinquain 

Machines 
Employed daily 
Replacing active men 
Unable to withstand pressure 
Breakdown. 

Amelia Rowe '69 



Search for Tomorrow 

Assume happiness at least for a moment. 

Can't do it? 

Well, then smile. 

Nothing to smile about? 

You say you've reached your millennium? 

So there's nothing left? 

Baffled? Of course vou are. 

You've lived so much you've forgotten how to live. 

Keep forgetting how to live. 

You'll fast become your own ghoul. 

When are vou going to temper yourself? 

Obstinate, aren't you? 

Conform to normality 

Stop trying to tune off and drop out. 

Give this world half a chance. 

Take a deep breath— some of the air is 

clean, just stop and smell it. 

You'll be surprised. 

You just may find a bit of happiness. 

Lynne Tatian '69 



Pain 



If you've tried to wander through my mind 
And the pain vou could not see, 
then you may have been the one 
who brought this pain to me . . . 

Kristen Lape 70 




Passage 

Silent messenger 
treading swiftly 
down rain swollen streets 
through the slashing storm 
and biting winds. 

I watch him cross 

the street 

knowing it is the last. 

I hear the music of 
celestial harps, 
and a thousand galaxies 
swirl before my eyes. 

A mighty hand from heaven 

etched in fine lines 

of reality 

lifts him aloft 

amid the swirling ruins 

of the sky. 



Wendy Martin '69 



10 



I was . . . and I shouldn't have been . . . 

I was on the train going home for a weekend from school with two of my friends. 
A sailor climbed into the train and sat down next to me. I was reading a book by 
James Baldwin, which he commented on. From then on there were scattered bits of 
introductory conversation. He told me he was just coming home to New York City 
after two years in Vietnam. This was my first meeting with someone who had fought 
in Vietnam. We talked about the fighting itself and the war in general. During the 
conversation I began to respect and admire this boy and to think about the fact that 
he was symbolic of thousands of voung men of our generation. 

After a while I asked him if, when he found out he had to go to Vietnam, he 
had been scared. He told me that it was a mixture of being shocked and scared, and 
that the first night he was over there he had had to shoot a man not five feet tall. 

Just before we were pulling into the station of my destination I told him how 
spoiled I felt compared to him: complaining about boarding school and thinking that 
during my two years there I have endured "unbearable hardship". I am only three 
years younger than that boy. I did feel hard used . . . but I shouldn't have; my 
meeting on the train taught me this fact. 

Bunny MacMannis 70 



The Sacrifice 

The crumb of bread was dropped upon the altar. 
Hurried feet mashed the particles into a 

hard small mass, 
pressurized and squelched— lost identity . . . 
An ant discovered the substance— 

a treasure of necessity. 

Elizabeth Hall '69 



11 



Advice to Those on the Brink 

Preserve your sanity— Build a defense mechanism— Watch it, kid— HE wants 
you! Lunacy can creep up in those soft treading PF Flyers if you don't devise that 
protective barrier. The symptoms are obvious: paranoia, one-way conversations, and 
bliss in oblivion— all seek you out. Retaliate! 

Retort, if you've got the stamina. First, admit to yourself that a battle exists. 
Don't deceive yourself, acknowledge the challenge, face it! This major step taken, 
the next few are not as hard on your pride. 

Keep occupied. This shield won't dent and let those unrelated fantasies infil- 
trate. By becoming involved with those "stable" people around you, you have no 
time to lose control of the senses. Don't slip— HE's watching. 

Leave no time for the real subconscious to peer through the surface. Flank your 
soundness or lose it completely. There is no medium! 

The daily groove is retraced. The needle of existence begins to wear. Substitute 
a new needle. Extract yourself from that worn environment. A new kind of monotony 
will help; then again . . . but hesitation may prove fatal. Move quickly. Don't worry 
about the rear view. Don't turn back. HE will be following you. 

Toni Pollak '69 



A Plea A La Vis-Ed 

My thoughts are sordid . . . 
Evil lurks in my mind ... a lucid reverie 
Black on white . . . superimposed . . . trepidation 
always malignant ... no illumination . . . 

despicable. 
This is the zenith ... we need light 
I plead to you . . . this is not a figment 
We exist . . . darkened. 
Search now . . . before we attend our own 

obsequies. 

Lynne Tatian '69 



12 




"ISS 



13 



A Flying Thing 

Blood relations had become confused in the old man's memory. He wasn't sure 
if the woman was his greatniece or granddaughter. She called him Grandpa, but he 
didn't think so. She was holding a boy by the arm. 

"Didn't you get the letter?" she asked, "It will be good for both of you, he'll be 
company." 

It's all right," the old man says. 

She looked at him, then bent to hug the boy. He turned rigid as a stake. "Oh, 
Rob," she said, then drove off. 

"Rob," the old man said. It was familiar. He realized, with pleasure, that it had 
been his own name once. 

"'I'm a problem, I'm bad, I'll scream!" 

"Scream, how loud is it?" 

The boy opened his mouth. 

"It is all right. Listen to this." 

It was a much better scream. 

"You're a lot older than I," the boy said defensively. 

"How old are you?" 

"Nine," the boy answered. "How old are you?" 

He stood for a while. 

"Ninety-one." 

"Who are you to me?" the old man said. 

"Somebody." 

But the old man couldn't be fooled. 

"Have you ever been anything besides yourself?" 

"I was a bug once but my mother stepped on me." 

"Try to be a flying thing, free." 

"An eagle?" 

"Perhaps, I'm a mallard, just taking off, climbing at a slant." 

"How about hunters and guns?" 
"That is a risk that has to be, but I'm always ahead of them, and they always miss." 
In his own youth he had been a stand-offer. Now at ninety odd years he began to see 
the error in it. Now he began to catch on. 

"You're something to me all right. Come I want to show you something." He 
took the boy out to a furrowed field. With his finger he brought forth a sprouting seed. 

"Eighty years of this and I still don't know what a seed is. But I know what I 
am to it." 

"What, What are you to it?" 

"Bring the hoe." 

"I'm not going to work here," the boy said. 

"Of course you're not!" 

"What are you to the seed?" the boy asked. 

"Bring the hoe here," the old man said. 

They chopped weeds for the rest of the afternoon. 

"I think I know, vou are the seed guarder." 

As dusk approached the old man shouldered his hoe. 

The milk rang out sharply against the bottom of the pail and the level mounted. 

14 



"This is work," the old man said. 

They carried the milk to the pig troughs. 

"1 have cows to keep the barn alive. I don't want to pass a dead barn." 

"Things know when thev are wanted, especially houses." 

"Let's have a feast tonight." 

Later they went out on the stoop in the warm night. 

"What is the best time for flying?" 

"Just before you sleep." 

In his room the old man undressed slowly and blew out his lamp, and used his 
last bit of strength to pull the covers over himself. 

He had barely settled on the pond when stealthy steps could be heard. He ran 
on the water and rose. He felt the pellets puncture him. Now he saw the vanity of 
title and deed and was content. The man had not inherited the earth. The earth had 
inherited him. The earth inherits certain men. He fell into a furrowed field as he 
always knew he would. 

Wendy Martin '69 




Prophecy 



Maxim 



I'm so fake 

I'm so afraid 

I don't give what I take 

I'm going to end up in 

Funnv freak parade . . . 

How about you— 

You comin' too? 



that 



Sue Aubin 71 



You think people live for you. 
You think people love for you. 
You'll realize someday that the 
World and the people in it 
Aren't existing just for you, 
But you for them. 
You either realize this fact, 
Or you'll perish from 
Your own self-pity. 



Debi Pletscher '69 



15 



Nativity 

The world was silent. 

Nothing 

Silence 

Breathings not heard 

The world was lit. 

Brightness 

A ball of yellow within the sky 

No sound . . . 

Stillness 
The world was aware. 
There was a sound. 
A cry 

A whimper 
The world gave birth. 
A baby . . . 

In the loving arms of its mother. 
The world had sound. 
Something 
Breathings 

Whimpers of a new generation— 
The world . . . 

was alive. 

Debbie Evans 72 



Christmas Cheer 

Joy Joy Joy 

Rejoice in solemn airs 

for those pitied. 

Breathe the breath of happiness. 

Wage your war, oh Vietnam! 

Sing loud your praise to the earth's end. 

The world unites in peace, 

Its iniquities forgotten. 

'Tis the season to be jolly. 

Ann Hemingway '69 



16 




Communion 

Open the doors of perception 
And see before you the 
Exquisite, sensual form of 
The breathing Morrison. 
"Wild Child" gushes from his 
Demanding mouth and untamed 
Movements of his leathered body 
Flash through foreign 
Minds, continents many 
Thousands of miles away. 
His mind drifts back and 
Pronounces again: Africa! 
Remember, my beautiful beast? 
We were once there. 

The warning cry, do not forget. 

Remember and wallow in 

Your surging, unconquerable youth. 

The pain and rushing of the time. 

The bloodstreaked walls of 

Man's unforgivable crime. 

He is not allowed to throw away the dew 

That flowed through his veins 

As he crawled on the earth 

Scrounging for berries with the animals; 

They became one. 

The glorious communion in 

The morning of man and beast. 

Pelting through the hide 

The string of poison 

Burns so deep 

Into the skin, pale and thin 

Before any protection can be taken. 

Pamela Bell '69 



17 



Graphically Speaking 

Why is it that it takes a picture to understand the theme? Is it a lack of intelli- 
gence, the lack of sensitivity or the lack of communication? Could it be the rush of 
society with its short cuts in everything to save time f or . . . what? Might our interests 
be so specialized that other fields are incomprehensible? Are we all separate furrows 
of a field with saturated seeds incapable of maturation— flooded to death? Is there 
only one water route to our lives? Are the others washed away? Must it take a 
drought to dry us out and to make us live again? Is this drought the picture of hope? 

Elizabeth Hall '69 



A Thought 

We are all alone 

Though some are more aware 

of it than others. 
Each travels on a path that intersects 

many paths 
But no two ways run parallel 

for long 
To accept this truth is to accept 

life itself 
And to deny it is to be hurt 

at every parting. 

Kathy Sullivan 71 



18 



Projection 

I wish there was some far off place, that man could grasp at will. It would not 
be Utopia, for there will never be such a place as long as there is man. Nor would it 
be over the rainbow, for fairv tales are only for the imagination of children. My place, 
if there was such, would be a place where man could roam a vast and open plain. 
The map he charts would be his own. 

Barbara Gray 71 



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Lesson 

A mind 

A body 

One attempts to have a human 

To draw one cannot 

Humans develop 

as a girl of two 

to my aging granny 

50 365 days older 

May arrives making me older 

Than my passing year 

But I never feel it then 

Granny catches me in August 

Still . . . 

50 years apart 
apart in looks, mind 
But I teach, strengthen her 
Granny teaches, strengthens me 
I love her 

Though ahead she is 
I'll follow, catch her 
Reaching my terminus of life 
Born, learn, and die 
That's what it's all about. 

Emily Gilbert 71 



21 



Quest 



May I please have a 
bi£ 



blue 




beautiful . . . 
airy . . . 
I alloon— I have always dreamed of having 
ne all mine and nobody else's— 
orry son— 

all . . . 

sold . . . 
out . . . 

Wendy Hansen 71 



X2z>Gt±<Krs 



You 



Within you there I see a spark, 
A distant one, but often glowing . . . 
It reaches me at silent times, 
And I catch it, knowing . . . 
now, it's mine . . . 

Kbisten Lape 70 



22 



A Trip 

Went to the zoo 

All the animals were in cages 

The zebra had black and white stripes 

The elephant was grey 

The sun was out 

And the sky blue 

But the bars were grey 

The bars were solid 

The bars were 

The bars . . . 

Sue Aubin 71 




23 



Someday 

You say You understand Us. 
You once felt what We feel. 
Your lives are but a dream; 
Nothing else is real. 

"Someday war clouds will cease to float in our heads, 
What does it matter that a few are dead?" 

You say money isn't everything 

You work because You're able 

How come We only see Daddy at the breakfast table? 

"Someday war clouds will cease to float in our heads, 
What does it matter that a few are dead? 

"Don't ever smoke," says He puffing His cigar. 

"I know what's good for you, and I like what you are. 

But don't quit school, or take LSD 

You want a good example? Just follow me." 

"Leave it to Us, just stay away. 
(There were three more stranglings in Boston today) 
We don't need you, We know what is right." 
(Did you hear about the riots in Detroit?) 

"Someday war clouds will cease to float in our heads, 
What does it matter that a few are dead? 

It's a good thing we're fighting this war. 

(Oh L.B.J, you're such a terrible bore.) 

We need more boys, send them in. 

(If they're old enough to kill, aren't they men?) 

But you know that— 

"Someday war clouds will cease to float in our heads, 
What does it matter that a few are dead? 

Jody Blatn 71 



24 



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Definition 



What 

is 

life 

? 

It's seasons, 
vears, time 



2. 




3. 



How does it start? 

the 

way 

leaves chase each 

other 

other 

in a 

circle 



It's the game. 
What does it 
mean? 



Beginning, 
Joy 



Learning, 
Teaching, Die, End. 






Nancy Dewey 7( 



, i * 



» '*» 



The Trap 

Alive 

I strive 
For something incomprehensible 
to myself. 
Hie 

and cry 
Never try to break the tie with which 
I cheat 

to make it 
I fake it. 
I run and I hide to get inside-not 
beneath it all 

up and away I fall; 
Underground is dark and gray 
I cannot stay 

I will not pay to 

get away 

from me. 

Sue Aubin 71 



Epitome of Life 

(Death) 

The webs of time, 
recaptured in a moment, 
veil our sins, 
demolish our minds, 
obliterate our bodies . . 
Cries from within 
grope for youth 
but the decaved soul 
no longer lives . . . 
fraught with fears 
and scared 
to death . . . 



Ann Hemingway '69 



27 



Two Poems 

A multitude of words 

to convey a meaning; 
a congestion of minds 

to unite a mass of people; 
a conglomeration of patience, effort and understanding 

to abort a temporary conclusion; 
only one absence of cooperation 

to destroy . . . 



A silent season of death 
prevails upon the living. 

Night's harmonious shadow sways 
your callous mind in a sickening way 
as your numb pruny feet clench 
the wedged stained stone. 
Mind and body are distant 
almost separate units as 

your madness steers your direction 
on an uncertain course. 

The deafening stillness 

deadens your mutilated confidence, 

while inhaling, the dilapidated fumes become increasingly suffocating 

The pathetic intensity of this bewildering circus of disaster 

and the overpoweringlv, clutching loneliness of it all 

devours you in your inability to recapture your sense of life. 

Lisa Strasburg '69 



28 






&Sr. 




Surf 

Blue water turns white 
it claws, trying to reach 
To capture the beach. 

Surf pounds the land 
The sand falls prey 
Swept frantically away. 

Wind then subsides 
Water laps the shore 
Placid once more. 

Nicola Plimpton '69 




30 



The Beginning 

Cradled child in 
Mother's womb 
Protected in silt-like 
Chambers 
Unhaunted by the 
Fountain rise of 
Richness. Glorious 
The child's eyes 
Cherished innocence 
Awaken thus. 
A birth renewed 
Life's patterned plan 
To live. 



Alida McIlvain '69 



Stones 

rose and rose of eyes 
staring pink into the water. 

reflections peek 
then shrink back into hiding. 

Sue Aubin 71 



Reverie 

Hypnotized by the snow falling outside my window, my mind sought the essence 
of winter. Birds were straining to find shelter, trees with their sagging breasts and 
arms reached for the earth, mischievous boys struggled to climb the mountainous 
drifts, only succeeding in acquiring cold hands and wet feet. But in my room, the 
penetrating thrill of summer caressed my thoughts, as I drifted alone. 

Amelia Rowe '69 



31 





32 



Un Reve 

Courez et riez 
Vos heures sont courtes et precieuses, 
La liberte'est belle. 



La Nature attend votre presence. 

Dansez en ses beautes 

Chantez au soleil 

Affranchissez-vous au vent 
Et courez a travers le champ des fleu: 
Sauvages. 

Tout seul dans le monde 
Vous avez decouvert une joie 
une amie, un reve. 

Ann Hemingway '69 



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'69 




Once Ivory Infant 

The infant fell from the ivory placenta 

Into the bamboo spikes of the awaiting terror 

And lurked in the blood and shattering screams 

Of the vicious darkness of East Fifty-ninth. 

The pain and suffering of the sordid crevices 

Swallowed him with trenchant, ensanguined jaws. 

He cried pitifully and his bones were dragged along 

The jagged mortar streets strewn with 

Broken glass and human spit. 

The frail little body badgered and 

Thrown from one cage to the next 

Never seeing the light of the morning 

Or the first flakes that fall 

On damp old newspapers people have 

Carelessly stuffed in smelly 

And gorged tin cans. 

He was cold and wet and musty 

Lying in the cigarette butt laden gutter. 

The ivory placenta had lost him forever and 

He may never return to 

The human warmth and smoothness of it again. 

Pamela Bell '69 




34 



Perched on the Palm of Boredom . . . 

Perched on the palm of boredom 
Where life is a meaningless game, 
They come in flocks of ravaging hawks 
Seeking victims to tame. 

Timed and judged by their conquests 
of passionate, impulsive lives, 
Their worlds are ruptured— void of truth 
Yet each one denies. 

They offer each other comfort 
Through false methods and lies 
And deny that they are hungry 
For fruitful, meaningful lives. 

Lynne Tatian '69 



Old Friends 

Whatever happens to old friends? 
Some go away . . . 
But where? 

Still, they remain forever, 

Not in my presence but in my mind. 

I often relive moments of 

sitting, talking, comparing, 
and asking, "Why?" . . . 

Times that have all gone . . . 

But where? 

Now there is only wonder, 
A restlessness, a slight pain, 
And silence . . . 

Nancy Dewey 70 



35 



In The Eating Place 

Alone I stand 

With my back to the ones 

Who are there 

Reaching out for 

Something that I know not. 

Like a drunk 

I sing and play 

With the words of 

Insanity, fear and hate 

leaping from me like a blazing sword 

to hurt and paralyze. 

In the eating place 

long lines of people 

come before me 

taking all of my mind 

leaving but just 

an empty dish. 

I starve and decay 

and die. 

Dania Doremus '69 



Violence 

My rights, my rights! 
Me 

I can get them only one 
way: 

Fight and protest. 

Fools give in and let it pass 
by... 

Give me what I deserve. 

It's unfair, unjust, un . . . good? 

You want it too- 
Come with me 

We shall go forward together 
if it takes all day. 

Louisa Reppucci 71 



36 




Space Odyssey 

Oh, Virgin Mind, 

Shake off your sins. 

Ugliness has bound them to thee. 

Space your virtues and boundaries 

A dream of fanaticisms 
Unrealistically portrayed through 
the spectrums of time. 

Foresee the light of death . . . 

Feel the ill wind! 

The mind now captured rests 
within itself. 



Ann Hemingway '69 



37 




City #13 

The world of minds 

Its passion, its pulse 

Of empty coats, ten cent cigars, and 

Street fed pigeons. 

Thin soled shoes 

Of old men with their cheap quarts of 

Wine, and young men with their empty 

Laughter, their scattered verse. 

Of street lights and light heads the 
Patrolman nipping in the alley and the 
Little girl from the Salvation Army 
Singing in the gutter. 

Of German sports cars and Italian food, 
Their friends many and their depressions few, 
And tears that fall to form the 
Rust on this, our suicide ring. 

Of our lovers and our haters and those 
Not yet known going out to the dark, 
Freed of thought, to gather plastic flowers. 

Wendy Martin '69 



38 



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39 




The Weary Days 

Soiled were the hands that worked each day in cotton fields; 

Weary were the feet that trod the ground; 

Thin were the figures that plucked from stem to stem, 

As the sun burned down on their brows. 

Loud were the shouts of the ruthless masters; 
Proud were the tones in their voices; 
The whip was their symbol and power their glory, 
As the sun burned down on their brows. 

The workers all sang of freedom; 
The masters shouted "work" in refrain; 
And on they worked in the heat of the day, 
As the sun burned down on their brows. 

Kitty Wick 70 



40 



The Drapes 

Is this the right door? 

Yes, I'm sure. Come on. 

Ooooh! What a nice room. 

Wc go this way, I think. 

The drapes are beautiful. 

Daddy's on the third floor. Come on, Ma. 

I think purple adds a lot to a room, don't you? 

Ma, if you don't hurry, visiting hours will be over. 

I'd like some drapes like this for the living room, I think. 

Why are you just standing there, Ma? Let's go. 

Yes, I think these would go very nicely in our living room. 

Truda Bloom '69 



Lily White 

She's inside the washing machine 
On the spin cycle after wash-dry 
Flashing colors so fast from 
The box of detergent crystals. 
Clean and white 
Virginity pure 
She emerges— crashing 
From the Westinghouse. 

Pamela Bell '69 



Flashback 

As the fog rolled across the moor 

I could hear the sound of a closing car door. 

I was fleeing for my life. 

I knew I should have hidden the knife. 

I was but shouldn't have been running. 

A cliff came closer and I found myself jumping. 

I was and shouldn't have been flying! 

Anne Loring 71 



41 




He 

is something so closely far away 

the light of a star shining from eons 

last year's rain hit today 

my pen so weak and thoughtless 

tracing . . . 

rearranging in rhythmic patterns of time 

i choose one moment and 

dry cry . . . 

so he makes another, i watch 

we pass . . . 

greens leave and browns fell yesterday 

it sunrained, my losses came and 

He gained? 

wearily i reach and heavily He falls 

a child of innocence 

the oneness walls . . . 

purplepink smile, my lifetime road 

i dove but 

He missed the catch . . . 

again i love and 

we fail 



Sue Aubin 71 



42 



Dear Past, 

How well I have known your every breath and moved with your every step. In 
all the years I have known you I have often looked back in despair for advice. You 
must know me better than I. Now as I glance back at you I remember the days I 
have loved— What was so often future and now is past— I have dreaded losing it all. 
Things I have loved have moved, yet I can still look to you in remembrance of loving. 
Remember, Past, when we walked through the woods and we lost our minds search- 
ing for acorns to whistle with? And, Past, the beaches we have known, the sands that 
have known our warm feet so well? All I have ever known has been you— your windy 
years, your dancing moods, and your sunshine-warm. I am so much aware of your 
distance now, but even more of some unknown future of which you will be a part . . . 

Kristen Lape 70 




43 



^ 



Willie 

Hev, mv vellow-skinned friend 

from across the sea, 

You pacified the perplexities 

that disillusioned me, 

While inspecting your liberty 

which I so admire 

And your endless motion 

which I so desire. 

So my absentee friend, 

Willie Wong, 

Keep straight, kid, for it is 

I who am wrong. 

TONI POLLAK '69 



n 




Almost 



Jane entered the clingy railroad station 
and ran quickly down the long winding 
stairway which led to the tracks. She tore 
past many curious faces, approached her 
track, and groaned as she saw the train 
steadily drawing away down the dim track. 
Helplessness crept over her. Presently she 
heard rhythmic panting beside her. She 
spun around and there stood a boy who 
stared longingly in the direction of the 
now-missing train. Jane meekly asked if 
his destination was anywhere near hers. 
The lean, dark boy merely grunted and 
continued to stare in the same direction. 

It would soon be evening and Jane 
could not help feeling guilty about her 
stupidity. Wearily she turned and reentered 
the station. She heard the boy shuffle 
along behind her. Both slowly moved to a nearby bench where they sat sullen, sub- 
dued by frustration. Finally they spoke, briefly mentioning their families and schools. 
Jane chatted easily; the boy said little. 

After a dreary two hours, another train bound for the same areas came rumbling 
up to the station. Their arms brushed as they hurried toward the track. The ride was 
a stuffy yet quite pleasant one. Jane continued to be the conversationalist while the 
boy stared out the large, grubby window. Jane finally gave up talking and decided 
to examine her companion. He was attractive, but he had that lost look which she 
knew often marked her own face. "Does he lead the confused and troubled life I do? 
Does he know what he wants for his future?" These were the questions that cluttered 
her mind. She then looked away, and as she did she could see, in the window 
reflection, his head turn toward her, and she almost felt his penetrating look. She 
turned her head and their eyes met. Slow smiles began to lift the corners of their 
mouths. At this moment the train rolled into Oakville and Jane took her bag in hand. 
"You live here?" mumbled the boy. 
"Yes," said Jane. "Don't you?" 
"Nope, next town." 

Their eyes met once more and then the train came to a dead halt. Jane slowly 
descended the steps. Soon she was shivering in the cold blanket of night. The train 
moved on down the dark track. 



Elaine Sohier 70 



45 




To-Ar^a.5^"^ 



Once Again 

If only everybody could be up at that early hour when the sun comes up so grace- 
fully, with its red and orange colors. How breath-taking it is since nobody has 
awakened and the animals are just beginning to stir. How peaceful and calm. The 
dew is still creeping through the grass like a spider in his shining web. All the night 
creatures are just settling down to take their turn in sleeping. 

Suddenly the big yellow sun is making its way across the sky. Children are 
coming out to play. The dew is gone and the green grass is blowing in the wind. 
Once again a new day has been born. 

Susan Torrey 71 



46 



Moods 

Slinking slippery strays 
Deluge of foggy foam 
Smoky fumes 
Untuned lanterns 
Relight the gloom 
for sidewalk drifters. 

Alida McIlvain '69 



Departure 

When we touch, so little time there is to be shared, that our few words often do 
tend to be strong and real. Strong, for within the time that we. shall next meet, there 
must be a remembrance of strength in our touching. Finding it time to part, you 
gently brushed my silent face, and I, bearing a promise, smiled goodbye. I reached 
for you, still grasping for the strength of words to open unto you my thoughts. And 
so we both felt our needs . . . departure once more had revealed them. If we had never 
known this sense of loss what would we have missed? More than one could measure. 
Both of us sharing vet not . . . both of us touching, yet not . . . 

merely building in pieces . . . 

Kristen Lape 70 



47 



When I Was Ten 

When I was ten and I ran through new 

falling snow and though it was infinite 

there was a goal. 

When I was ten the sun was mine 

and I smiled feeling its warmth . . . 

When I was ten I walked in summer 

puddles to feel the rain dripping from 

my hair into my face. 

When I was ten I breathed the air 

to breathe and I was alive. 

When I was ten the daffodils were 

yellow in spring and grass was green. 

The world was new and young and 

so was I. 

Today I feel so old 

like mold. 



Sue Aubin 71 



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48 




49 




A Poem 

Rich webbed images of your enchanting tongue 

sift a vague dream into the cavities of my hungry mellow eyes. 

I visualize a temperamental eternal solitude in spirit so human, 

as much so as truth allows; yearning 

seeking the restoration of nature 

buried far beneath the infectious soil in protection 

against escape and recognition of its hidden existence. 



50 



As you see a suppressed horizon at your feet, 
ecstatic shadows like that of the memory of time, 
race, overlapping along my wall embodied in moss 
and floods of naked sky in massive colors, drop 
as a reflection of what you don't know. 

Fumbling in delight in the buoyant island of your mind 
permitting infatuation of illusion in your provided 
purified, disclosed sanitary play-yard. 

Aimlessly wandering . . . 

the sedate tune from the landrover long traveled, passed, 
complacent in a frame of tranquility in your sub-conscience; 
each sequence passing in waves as interludes of the coma. 

(continued) 






Imprinting distorted footprints on cracked, sun-drenched rock 

in the midst of barren entanglement— rotted bark 

and soggy lifeless leaves. 

Ingrown is an occasional mushroom in the hollow canyon of an unrooted wood, 

similar to man's persisting ideals which also lack the balance 

that responds in coordination with common survival. 










Fountains of spray, untouched by civilization 
silhouettes in the paralyzing breeze 
falling repeatedly together into an exploiting pool 
to protect itself, as does man in civilization as a trap, 



(continued) 



53 




The foamed velvet filtered soot 

embedded in the inane crevices, is suctioned into the gravitating soil. 



54 







The timeless hours drift with eternity 

as interrelated past and future dissolve into recurring motionless recreation. 



(continued) 



55 





* 








The stick in your hand is released into the small body of discolored sea. 

Disfigured reflections in striped colors and amoeba shapes 

inevitably deplete memories of submitting yourself to 

subordinate constraints of nature . . . 

The facetious realism has destroyed the sentiment. 

Cry, yes: then bellow into laughter, 

sure one! 

Thrust your content mind into the maze of curiosity and change; 

to be carried out to sea. 

'Tis more adequate to pretend you are what you haven't quite reached. 

Once reached 

you no longer have the feeling of what you were striving to become. 



Lisa Strasburg '69 



56 



SPLINTERS 



NORTHEAST OFFSET Inc. 




260 BILLERICA ROAD - ROUTE 129 

CHELMSFORD, MASSACHUSETTS 01824 

Telephone 454-7791 Area Code 617 



58 



dfl 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



CONANT'S GROCERY 



59 



SPLINTERS 



Sheraton 

Rolling 
Green 

Motor Inn 



tfc Boneless Roast Spring Chicken. 
Fork -Tender! 



Feast 

Sheraton Rolling Green Motor Inn 
Jet. Interstate 93 and Rte. 133 
Andover/ Call 475-5400 
Function Facilities — up to 750 people 



COCA-COLA CO. 



Lowell, Mass. 



BLANCHARD CHARTERED SERVICE, INC. 

owned and operated by 
ALVIN T. FRENCH 

Tewksbury 



60 



SPLINTERS 




PAINT c WALLPAPER 



40 I erry jireei Lowell, /MassachuseHs 

Telepkone Area coJe 617 459-9862 



Buckland Printing Co. 

Lowell, Mass. 



WIGS 

by 



C/nc..o»iowiu/ 



45 Merrimack Street 



Tel. 458-6331 



61 



SPLINTERS 



"100 Years of Quality and Service" 

PRINCE'S 

Stationers - Booksellers • Gifts 
Typewriters - Greeting Cards 



96-104-108 MERRIMACK ST. 



LOWELL, MASS. 




Compliments of 



THE SCOTT JEWELRY CO. 

60 Merrimack St. 
corner of Central St. 

LOWELL, MASS. 



Compliments of 

BELYIDERE WINE CO., INC. 



Compliments of 

POST OFFICE 
LOCKSMITH 

A. M. JEKNAVORIAN 



LOWELL WINDOW SHADE 



62 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



Beebe Blakeley & Forbes Insurance Agency Inc. 

28 STATE STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 



523-8140 



f^ tanned Endurance /Protection \^.aSuallu 

^rire t/Sondi oLlte 



L^aSuattu Ivli 



arine 



MARCUS G. BEEBE 

29A Chestnut St., Boston 
523-4807 



WINSOR H. BEEBE 

258 Chestnut St., Lynnfield Center 
334-4084 



L. THOMAS RAND 

7 Hunt Road, Lexington 
862-6953 



63 



SPLINTERS 




WE WOULD LIKE TO CARE FOR 
YOUR INSURANCE 

Study it. Plug any gaps. Watch over it. And keep you 
up-to-date. Ours is a total service — for the individual, 
business, or both. All lines including life. 



Fred.C. Church & Company 

Insurance since 1865 

Lowell, Chelmsford, Littleton 

in ANDOVER the Smart & Flagg Agency 




SOLD AT 

McKITTRICK HARDWARE CO. 

Plumbing, Heating, Farm Supplies 
60 Fletcher Street LOWELL, MASS. 



HIGHLAND LAUNDRY 


Art Suf flies - Yarn - Cards - Toys 


SUNSHINE CLEANERS 


THE MINUTE SHOP 


49 Kearney Square 


Donna M. Brown 


and 


Pauline M. Miller 


157 Andover St. 


Tel. 862-0991 


— Same day service when requested — 


47 Waltham Street, Lexington, Mass. 



64 



SPLINTERS 



RWB REALTY CORP. 

P. O. BOX 1243 READING, PENN. 19603 



STANLEY C. MARSDEN 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 



43 Livingston Ave. GLenview 2-4482 

Lowell 



Heating & Cooling Equipment 
— Fuels — 
D. T. SULLIVAN CO., INC. 

1012 SORHAM ST. TEL GL 4-7857 



Compliments of 



LEFTY'S DRIVE-IN 

600 Rogers St. on Rt. 38 Lowell, Mass. 
452-8375 

Pizza • Torpadoas • Hamburg* • Clams • Dogs 
Take Out Service Table Service 



65 



SPLINTERS 



// 

YOU CAN DEPENO ON 
m CLEANING 



5 EAST MERRIMACK STREET, LOWELL, MASS. 



Motors • Automatic Transmission 
Brakes 

BLACKSTOCK GARAGE 

Experienced Repairing 

Tel. GL 2-4871 



572 Rogers St. 



Lowell, Mass. 




LOWELL GAS COMPANY 

SERVING COMMUNITY 
AND INDUSTRY 



JOHNSTON'S BAKERY 

295 Westford St. 
LOWELL, MASS. 



66 








CLUB 



68 69 



* 






67 



SPLINTERS 




YOUNG JRS. SHOP 
feature fashions 

YOUNG, LIVELY 
Moving ... To The 

Beat of the Moment 



BON MARCHE 



153 MERRIMACK ST., LOWELL 



Cinema, Inc. 



MT. PLEASANT 
SPRING WATER CO., INC. 

Steadman St. LOWELL, MASS. 

Tel. 459-9041 



A PRESCRIPTION STORE SINCE 1040 




TTMERHlftACOT. 458-847? LOWElLMASS 



68 



lift * l' -'I' ■ ,■>!■■> ^ . ..a ...,■.— ," 




69 



SPLINTERS 




Lovipliuiixfj- y 








^'MfltW.^ ** 



Compliment! of 
Office 454-7971 



Res. 256-0382 



E. C. Pearson Painting Co. 



215 RIVERNECK ROAD 
CHELMSFORD, MASS. 01824 



INTERIOR DECORATORS 



PAINTING CONTRACTORS 



70 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



E. A. WILSON CO. 



700 Broadway 

Lowell, Massachusetts 



FUELS 



71 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



BROX'S DAIRIES 



STANLEY C. MARSDEN 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 



43 Livingston Ave. GLcnvicw 2-4482 

Lowell 



Heating & Cooling Equipment 
— Fuels — 
D. T. SULLIVAN CO., INC. 

1012 GORHAM ST. TEL GL 4-7857 



72 



SPLINTERS 



DEMERS PLATE GLASS CO. 

OF LOWELL 
GLASS AND MIRRORS OF ALL KINDS 

AGENTS FOR 
S*4t«** OVERHEAD TYPE DOORS 

54 CHURCH STREET, LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 01853 



George's Textile Co. 

FABRICS FROM AMERICAS FINEST MILLS 



C-RICH FRUIT JUICES, Inc. 

1040 GORHAM ST. 
LOWELL, MASSACHUSETTS 



NEW ENGLAND FIRE 
EQUIPMENT COMPANY 

-SALES and SERVICE - 

63 LANE ST. LOWELL, MASS. 

Telephone GL 2-3779 



2^/>z. Ctoub '6f-Z? 



DIAMOND TAXI 



128 Warren St. 



Lowell, Mass. 




UNITED RESTAURANT EQUIPMENT 



297 CENTRAL ST. 



LOWELL, MASS. 



73 




74 



SPLINTERS 



J^ussell Lumber Company 



SINCE 1026 



YARD MILL AND OFFICE 
TEL. 439-9336 



MEADOWCROFT ST. 
LOWELL, MASS. 




o£erJson's 



FURNITURE*RUG$ 

**. 1086 



LOWELL'S LARGEST furniture store for 82 years 



JOHN A. HUTCHINSON & SON 

Building Contractors 

Cabinet Work - Ceramic Tile - Stained Glass 
280 Fairmount Street, Lowell 



Tel. 452-1956 



Compliments of 

DRS. WILLIAM R. PEPIN, SR. 
and W. REID PEPIN 



JAMES F. BRINE, INC. 

Oflkletic Outfitters 

(complete Sporting Cfooos 

^Men's - QD) omen's Sport (slothes 




29 Brattle Street, Harvard Square 
TRb-4218 • Cambridge, Maj3. 



75 



SPLINTERS 



jknne. Chart*. 





O'CONNOR & HILL HARDWARE 



460 Lawrence Street 



LOWELL, MASS. 



Compliments of 

GENE'S HI GRADE 
ICE CREAM 







76 



SPLINTERS 



u 



J 



n 




77 



SPLINTERS 



T«l. 452-4771 



Douglas & C< 



Inc. 



Las cv company, 

SLATE, GRAVEL, TILE AND METAL ROOFING 

CORNICE AND SKYLIGHT WORK 

147 Rock Street Lowell, Mass. 01654 




DEBATE- 
CLUB 



"For Better Health Eat More Fish" 

W. J. HOARE 

Wholesale and Retail 
Fresh Fish, Oysters, Clams, Lobsters, etc. 

461 Lawrence St. LOWELL, MASS. 

Dial 2-3571 



Compliments of 

PUTNAM & SON 



207 MARKET ST. 



LOWELL, MASS. 



Compliments of 



THE LOWELL FRUIT (0. 



78 



SPLINTERS 



i^omp llmeniA of 




for uou who care . 
the cleaner who 



Serving. \Jver 30 L^ommunitied ZJ nrouanout 



Ok 



tflerrimach Uatli 



79 



SPLINTERS 



Food for the Hungry 

Drink for the Thirsty 

Rest for the Weary 

TOWN HOUSE MOTOR INN 

Specializing in personalized service 
to groups of up to seventy people 

BANQUETS - MEETINGS - SHOWERS - WEDDINGS 



Compliments of 

DONALDSON'S 



75 MERRIMACK STREET 



LOWELL 



80 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



^aMtte ^ctie&, Inc. 



81 



SPLINTERS 



Riding Club 



A. A. SMITH & CO., INC. 



Est. 1906 

Authorized Dealers Olivetti Underwood 

Sales • Service • Rentals 

34 Central Street LOWELL, MASS. 

GL 7-7481 



JOSEPH E. STAVELEY 

Plumbing and Heating 



STEAM, GAS k WATER SYSTEMS 



Residence 

Westford Road 

Chelmsford 

Dial 2-3741 



Shop 

490 Chelmsford St 

Lowell, Mass. 



82 



SPLINTERS 



JANE TOOHER 



Sports Clothes, Inc. 

598 COLUMBIA RD. DORCHESTER, MASS. 



Compliments of 


AG HARDWARE SUPPLY 


PARADISE DONUTS 


CO., INC. 




776 LAKEVIEW AVENUE 




LOWELL, MASS. 01850 


GAUMONT BROS., INC. 


Edward Kelly Co. 


"Where Television and Appliances 
are a specialty . . , 


Industrial and Commercial 
SHEET METAL WORKERS 


not just a sideline" 




39 Kearney Sq. 
opposite the P.O. 455-5656 


^„ =.,.., 116 FLETCHER STREET 
TELEPHONE 458-8313 LOW ELL. MASS. 



Compliments of 



MATTHEW MILAN 



— Designer and Maker of Fine Jewelry — 



Rm. 317 Washington Bldg. 
Liberty 2-3117 



387 WASHINGTON ST. 
BOSTON 8, MASS. 



83 



SPLINTERS 




The 

Photography 

Club 



WOOD-ABBOTT CO. 



Established 1872 



Diamond Merchants and Jewelers 



75 MERRIMACK STREET 



LOWELL, MASS. 



Compliments of 


THE BARROWS TRAVEL 




SERVICE, INC. 


THE STUDENT COUNCIL 


420 Hildreth Building 




45 Merrimack St. LOWELL, MASS. 




459-9319 



84 



SPLINTERS 



Best Wishes from the 




*4jf;%f$ 



Compliments of 



ASA BARTLETT PRESS 



Compliments of 

EASTERN SERVICE CO. 

Frigidart Sales A Strvice 

238 Shaw St. LOWELL, MASS. 

(Phone GL 3-3979) 



BARRY'S PASTRY SHOP 

434 CENTRAL ST. LOWELL, MASS. 

TEL. 452-1519 

WEDDING AND BIRTHDAY CAKES 



Compliments of 



The Junior Class 



85 



SPLINTERS 



Get It At 

Parkway Prescription Pharmacy 

James J. Queenan, Reg. Ph. 
309 ROGERS ST. - LOWELL, MASS. 



Free Delivery 



Phone GL 4-4831 



Compliments of 



Kava Cheerleaders 



LOCKE AND NATIONAL POWER LAWN MOWERS 
PEERLESS SNOW PLOWS 

Si&phsun d?£/tAC} Qd., (Jjvc. 

625 MAIN STREET (ROUTE 38) 
WILMINGTON. MASSACHUSETTS 



658-61 60 



PHONE 475-4821 



OLDE ANDOVER VILLAGE 



PNU DKUIVKMY • ANDOVER. UWKINCI, NO. ANOOVKN 

93 MAIN STREET, ANDOVER, MASS. 01810 
CLINTON E. RICHARDSON 



86 



SPLINTERS 



Compliments of 



ALBERT RICHARDS CO., Inc. 



Compliments of 



ANDOVER BOOK STORE 



Compliments of 



The Senior Class 



87 



SPLINTERS 



776-461 1 



S^tnica Studio 

- PHOTOGRAPHERS - 

286 BROADWAY, WINTER HILL 
SOMERVILLE, MASSACHUSETTS 02145 



88 



Compliments oj 



A Friend 







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SPLINTERS 



Pamela Bell 
Elizabeth Hall 



Cynthia Brox 
Suzanne Johnson 
Linda Juszczak 



Dania Doremus 



Truda Bloom 



Editor-in-Chief 
Alida McIlvain 

Literary Board 

Lynne Tatian 

Business Board 
Manager— Karen Anderson 



Elizabeth Holihan 
Lisa Strasburg 



Marion Eddy 
Amelia Rowe 

Anne Washburn 



Art 

Editor— Betsy Nauss 

Staff 

Informal Photographers 



Marilyn Keast 



Estela Alvarez 



Faculty Literary Advisor 
Mrs. Dorothy A. Worsham 



Faculty Art Advisor 
Mrs. Dorothy I. Perloff 



EDITORIAL 

Wisdom grows as man steps from secure knowledge into the insecure 
unknown. The ultimate act of faith then is proved when man is able to face 
the unexplored region, defending with his wisdom and pursuing with his 
reason. The struggle for intelligent faith is guided only by his wisdom, and 
thus are discovered points of value in the midst of vast confusion. Once the 
fact of the impossibility of absolute certainty is realized the way of wisdom 
becomes the recognition of degrees of probability. 

Within wisdom is found the clarity for living. Clearmindedness, rever- 
ence and rationality are the furnishings of reason. The ambition for man to 
live in a more perfect and harmonious society can be achieved only through 
truth and wisdom. Materialistic wealth often represses this ambition, yet if 
used reasonably this wealth may become an addition of privilege and an 
advantage for further enlightenment. 

The mind of man must be fed knowledge as must his heart absorb the 
gifts of knowledge: sensitivity and hope for everlasting life. Through struc- 
tured education and experience, the mind is able to capture infinite ideals 
and probabilities, while it deciphers a clearer vision of the meaning of life. 
In broadening his mind man must improve his methods of inquiry in order 
to perceive the difference between what is and what is desired. Thus man's 
heart and mind must work together as an entity to establish the whole con- 
ception of truth. 

When man's need for wisdom surpasses that of bodily desire, then he 
is ready to step forward into another area of our small worlds to help to 
widen the horizon of those who see and to seek to open the minds of the 
blind to life's richness and wisdom . . . 



p *. 







m*& 



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^ 




Miss Hildred Ramsay 
Headmistress of Rogers Hall 



TO THE MEMBERS OF THE SENIOR CLASS 

Only a year ago, at this very time, we mourned the 
tragic death of another Kennedy, Robert. In his eulogy for his 
brother, Senator Ted Kennedy said that he hoped his brother 
would be remembered as a "good and decent man who saw 
wrong and tried to right it." This is also my hope for the 
class of '69— that you will become good and decent women 
who will see wrong and try to right it in a good and decent 
way. 



DEDICATION 

Mrs. Staten, in our daily trips to the office to ask both 
petty and important details, you have always had an answer 
for us. You have impressed upon us the significance of 
details. Through your witty comments you have influenced 
us with good judgement as well as good taste. Though our 
world may "not be the way it used to be," we hope you will 
remember us as kindly as we will remember you. 




William "Bill" Sigman 






IN APPRECIATION 

Bill, you have always been there to help us when we 
needed assistance— be it chauffeuring, refereeing, doing er- 
rands, working around the grounds and on dances, collecting 
ads for Splinters and, of course, conducting the festivities at 
Singing Beach. We could not mention all that you have done 
in the past years through your ceaseless toiling. We will never 
forget your delightful stories and wonderful heart. 



Our purpose is to cultivate in the largest possible number 
of our future citizens an appreciation of both the responsi- 
bilities and the benefits which come to them because they 
are Americans and are free. 

—James Bryant Conant 



■'.'-■>•■ 

MNnQB 

HSBfRKM 



ni 




Miss Kathleen Day 

ACADEMIC SECRETARY, HISTORY 

Mrs. Patricia M alone 

MATHEMATICS 

Miss Susan Bamford 

ENGLISH 



Miss Dorothy LeButt 

PIANO, MUSIC APPRECIATION 
AND GLEE CLUB 



Miss Dorothy Phelps 

LATIN, FRENCH AND 
ANCIENT HISTORY 



Miss Doris Alexander 

MATHEMATICS 




Mrs. M. Sargent 

HOUSEMOTHER 

Mrs. B. Crosbie 

DIETICIAN 

Mrs. A. Jones 

HOUSEMOTHER 




Mrs. Louise Staten 
secretary 



Mrs. Doris Phinney 
financial secretary 





Mrs. Pamela Hoffer 

FRENCH 

Mrs. Judith Sadowski 

biology, chemistry, 

general science 

Miss Carol Bowes 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
AND PHYSIOLOGY 



Mrs. Dorothy Perloff 
art and history of art 



Mrs. Dorothy A. Worsham 

ENGLISH AND DRAMATICS 




JfK^r 




Mrs. Frances Jones 
alumnae secretary 



Miss Mary Johanna Perkins 
history and current events 



Miss Anne Dorland Pulling 

SPANISH 



Mrs. Barbara Brewer 

nurse 



Mrs. Nina Latour 
shorthand and typing 





Bruno's lunch, what else? 




Oh, for a one-way ticket 
to New Hampshire . . . 




Oh! How awful! 




Now is that being a good citizen? 




I'm certainly a winner 




Just wait till you get to college 





Wouldn't Caesar be mad for me? 



It certainly is mucho friol 





Now, girls, when 1 was on the 
team at Smith . . . 






Laril 



Who says I'm the official cha-perone? 



In dreams begin responsibilities. 

— Delmore Schwartz 



7M 



mm 



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3 













The years that the class of 1969 have spent at Rogers 
Hall have given us a foundation of relative stability. As we 
face the present trend of student unrest, we feel that this 
foundation has prepared us to commence with strength. We 
have experienced life in a secure and conservative atmo- 
sphere, in which we have developed a strong interest in 
fairness, in truth and in other people. With these qualities, 
we are ready to continue life with courage and purposeful- 
ness. 

—Betty Hall 




Senior Class Officers 



Cynthia Brox (Vice-President) 
Elizabeth Hall (President) 




"And he that hringeth the sun into the heart of the 
day, lives in the midst of love ..." 



KAVA Club 

Hockey 3, 4 

Volleyball 2, 3, 4 (Captain) 

Class Vice-President 3 

Proctor 3 

Honor Roll 3 

Neatness Award 2, 3 

Debate Club 4 

Spanish Club 1, 2 (Vice-President), 

3 (Vice-President), 4 (President) 
Splinters Photographer 4 
Photography Club 4 (Secretary) 
Founder's Day 3 

Music Appreciation 2 (Honorable Mention), 

4 (Honorable Mention) 



ESTELA MARIA TERESA ALVAREZ 

85-11 Avon Street 
Jamaica, New York 

Elmira College 



Peace with friends . . . bearing others' af- 
flictions . . . parks full of flowers . . . 
"Alida, the debil's gonna get you!" . . . 
who's the phone for? . . . Wonder where 
Craig is . . . Mount Washington? . . . 
Cracking feet . . . D'em dry bones! . . . 
dead flowers— "they're sooo beautiful!" . . . 
any gum? . . . the D.R. way . . . "You're 
so undemocratic!" . . . SOMEDAY . . . 
morning glory at four A.M. ... "I just 
love her!" ... a little lost face, Shirley . . . 
night owls . . . who's superstitous? . . . 
strange study habits . . . "You dirty old 
man!" . . . stubborn will! . . . neveT a good- 
bye . . . 




KAREN ANDERSON 

39 Daniels Street 
Lowell, Massachusetts 

Muhlenberg College 




Bon Marche . . . but did you like it? . . . 
well bye . . . tough . . . poor babe . . . cup 
of coffee and a piece of pie . . . just 
thought I'd drop in . . . devoted day- 
student . . . you know . . . chemistry . . . 
Anderson and Brox's Luncheonette and 
Dragstrip . . . Well, it's been swell . . . 



"Serenity and joyfulness are the sun under which 
everything thrives." 




CAE Club 

Honor Roll 1, 2, 3, 4 

Current Events 1 (Honorable Mention), 2 

Music Appreciation 1 (Honorable Mention), 3 

The Columns 2, 3 (Exchange Editor) 

Splinters Business Board Manager 4 

Dramatics 2 (Honorable Mention), 3, 

4 (Honorable Mention) 
Dramatics Club 2, 3, 4 
French Club 4 

Red Cross Senior Life Saving 2 
Volleyball 2, 3, 4 
Basketball 3, 4 (Captain) 
Hockey 2, 3, 4 
Softball 3, 4 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4 
Swim Team Manager 4 
R. H. Award 4 
Music Appreciation Award 4 
Underhill Honor 4 




"Liberty of thought is the life of the soul." 



PAMELA VIRGINIA BELL 

83 Beacon Street 
Marblehead, Massachusetts 



Petite . . . baby chickens . . . light footed 



dig it . . . bread 
weekends ... if 
ski . . . backs . . 
straightest girl . . . 
. . . Mama Berdalini 
doo artist . . . 



. . Anna . . . medical 
only she knew how to 



. posture award for the 

. playing in the ghetto 

'.U.V.M ski- 



KAVA Club 

Ski Club 

The Columns 2, 3 (Editor) 

Photography Club 3 

Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 2, 3 (Vice-President), 4 

World Affairs Council 4 (Secretary) 

Water Ballet 1 

French Club 2, 3, 4 

Founder's Day 3 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Hockey 4 




TRUDA ANNE BLOOM 




27 Dewey Street 
Lawrence, Massachusetts 

Boston University 



j 



BLOOM ROOM . . . psychodrama trauma 
... oh, those goldy locks ... I CAN'T 
explain it! . . . group discussion . . . calam- 
ity, chaos and confusion . . . Cycorbit 
exploitation . . . Cats, Cats, and more Cats 
. . . freedom will NEVER come ... of 
course, I'll know my lines . . . my look of 
innocence gets me places . . . 



"A man without ceremony has need of great merit 
in its place." 




KAVA Club 

Photography Club 3, 4 (Vice-President) 

Splinters Photographer 4 

Dramatics 3 (Honorable Mention), 4 

Volleyball 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 3, 4 

French Club 4 

Dramatics Award 4 




SUSAN WILSON BROWN 

The Knolls 
Williamstown, Massachusetts 



/ 



Mount Vernon Junior College 



'It is worthier of man to rise in laughter above life 
than to bewail in it." 



The gym ... to the woods! . . . Lefferts 
and Spring . . . second floor— end room 
. . . Oh, Brownie! . . . Wellesley . . . Janie 
. . . any more bubble gum? . . . unsuspect- 
ing innocence . . . but watch Steve Mc- 
Queen! ... in the windmills of your mind. 



CAE Club 

Spanish Club 

Hockey (2nd team) 3, 4 

Volleyball (2nd team) 3, 4 

Basketball (2nd team) 3, 4 

Softball 2, 3 

World Affairs Council (Treasurer) 

Music Appreciation 4 (Honorable Mention) 




CYNTHIA ANNE BROX 

192 North Lowell Street 
Methuen, Massachusetts 

Marymount College 

Vice-President of the Senior Class 




Mother of Pearl . . . party time . . . choco- 
late milk and cake . . . GTO . . . another 
college acceptance . . . apples . . . Charlie 
. . . I'm a lovely child . . . moose . . . I'm 
so beautiful . . . prom hopper . . . Brox's 
Taxi Service . . . 2:20 visits . . . Keith 
Academv forever . . . split? . . . solid . . . 
quee-ah . . . 



"A jest, a laughing word, often decides the highest 
matters." 




CAE Club 

Music Appreciation Award 2 

Library Committee 3 

World Affairs Council 4 (President) 

Dramatics 1, 2, 3 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Dramatics Club 3, 4 

S-plinters Business Board 4 

French Club 4 

Hockev Manager 4 




DANIA SWIFT DOREMUS 

South Road 
Harwinton, Connecticut 

Bournemouth College 

President of KAVA Club 



"Diligence is the mother of good luck. 



No, no, that's the Oslnominota! . . . Lis- 
ten, honey bunch! . . . wake me up . . . 
harmonica . . . she's the INFURIORAT- 
ING type . . . Hey Sam! . . . Don't be a 
wise guy! . . . Kite Days ... I DON'T 
BELIEVE WE'RE DOING THIS . . . 
Don't SCARE me! . . . confused . . . all- 
year hayfever . . . tact . . . whirlpool of 
thoughts . . . Well, I'll be a monkey's 
uncle . . . floor chambermaid . . . 



KAVA Club 

Dramatics Club 2, 3, 4 (President) 

Dramatics 2, 3, 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Founder's Day 3 

Hockey 4 (Second Team) 

Water Ballet 4 

Sflinters Art Board 4 

Spanish Club 4 

World Affairs Council 4 

Debate Club 3 

Honorary R. H. Award 4 




MARION EDDY 

20 Edbert Drive 
New Britain, Connecticut 

Katherine Gibbs 




Merry . . . Nurse Marion . . . this sweater's 
for . . . the Vineyard ... oh NOOO! . . . 
"How does this look?" . . . Hay, Morlan 
Midgets won again! ... all right, LADIES, 
this is how it's going to be! . . . floppy hats 
. . . bathroom reentrances ... 5 A.M. and 
STILL typing? ... I'm not KIDDING . . . 
Another project? . . . Someday maybe . . . 
Madame Librarian . . . 



"Since thou art not sure of a minute, throw not 
away an hour." 




CAE Club 

Dramatics 2 (Honorable Mention), 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 2, 3 (Vice-President), 4 

Glee Club 2, 3 (Vice-President), 4 

R. H. Negatives 3, 4 (Leader) 

Music Appreciation 2 (Honorable Mention), 

4 (Honorable Mention) 
Student Council 4 
Founders Day 3 
Volleyball 4 (2nd team) 
Hockey 3 (2nd team), 4 
Basketball 3, 4 (2nd team) 
Softball 3, 4 
Honor Roll 3 
Class President 3 
Splinters Business Board 4 
Senior Luncheon Literary Board 3 




SUSAN WILLIAMS ELLINGTON 

424 Ocampo Drive 
Pacific Palisades, California 

Cazenovia College 



''Nothing can bring you feace but yotirself." 



It's about that time . . . Malibu . . . The 
Hotel . . . Bosstovvn-yeh! ... My "GOOD" 
friend, Wayne ... hit me again . . . food? 
Where? . . . I'm sooo fat . . . How am I 
supposed to know where L.A. is? . . . just 
a follower ... in the closet. 



KAVA Club 

Spanish Club 3, 4 (Vice-President) 

Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, 4 

Volleyball 3 (2nd team Captain), 4 

Basketball 4 (2nd team) 

Ski Club 4 

Field Hockev 3, 4 (2nd team) 

Father's Day Committee 1 

Music Appreciation 4 (Honorable Mention) 

R. H. Award 4 

Parsons Honor 4 




JENNIFER MARIE FOSTER 

80 State Street 
Ellsworth, Maine 

Wheaton College 



"Just follow the bouncing bodv!" . . . 
You're in WOVE Foster, and you know it 
. . . the in crowd . . . Bubble gum, anyone? 
. . . Jimmy, Danny AND Wavne Baby 
. . . Forget it. I'm going to bed! . . . and I 
hope this bed lasts through the year, Tash! 
. . . Confucious say . . . Bowdoin . . . 
only ? more days! . . . and never forget the 
Spring of '68! 




"Obey that impulse" 




CAE Club 

French Club 4 

Ski Club 3 

Proctor 4 

Cheerleading 3, 4 

Breakfast Club 4 (Vice-President) 

Honor Roll 3, 4 

The Columns 3 

CAE Nominating Committee 3 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Commencement Plav 3 

Volleyball Manager 4 




'',,«■-;... 



"Wish not so much to live long, as to live well." 



KAVA Club 

Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4 

Swimming Team 3 

Water Ballet 4 

Red Cross Junior Life Saving 2 

Neatness Award 3 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

The Columns Co-Editor 3 

Class President 1, 4 

Senior Luncheon Literary Committee 3 

Proctor 3 

Dramatics 2, 3 (Honorable Mention), 4 

Dramatics Club 2, 3, 4 

Debate Club 3, 4 

Ski Club 1, 2 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Photography Club 4 

Honor Roll 4 

Helen Hill Award 4 

Dramatics Award 4 



ELIZABETH MORRISON HALL 

345 Nahant Road 
Nahant, Massachusetts 

Springfield College 

President of the Senior Class 

Hi, Love! . . . Give me a "B" . . . Florida 
. . . another hoppy prom? . . . "Beautiful" 
. . . won't you play a simple melody ... "I 
didn't know she polished apples, let alone 
eat them!" ... I don't care, everybody's 
going crazy . . . ad-libber . . . nannynoo- 
noo . . . spontaneous inventions! the abom- 
inable brain . . . SURE . . . why not? 
frustrated? Never! . . . sleep? OR study 
. . . everyday is a new day . . . keep 
smiling! yeah . . . unique . . . Tilton? 
WHERE! . . . Laughing is good for the 
digestion . . . Lobster Mobster . . . 




ANN TROWBRIDGE HEMINGWAY 

81 Glenbrook Drive 
Cheshire, Connecticut 

Bradford Junior College 

Vice-President of KAVA Club 

Sophia Peruzi . . . LIQUEFY! . . . Bru . . . 

we were sitting on Ginger Baker's lap . . . 
feed me, I'm hungry . . . Gestapo . . . 
tomato fight with Mighty Mai . . . 
RAUNCHY . . . Perrelli is the one . . . 
Crackerjacks of Lowell . . . Pink Chablis 
. . . Ah, one, two this is our gig . . . the 
grass is greener in New Haven ... we got 
stuck up in the closet and couldn't get 
down . . . soulfully yours . . . 




"And forget not that the earth delights to feel your 
hare feet and the winds long to flay with your 
hair." 




KAVA Club 

Photography Club 3, 4 

The Columns 2, 3 (Photography Editor) 

Music Appreciation 3 (Honorable Mention), 

4 (Honorable Mention) 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Dramatics 2, 3, 4 (Honorable Mention) 
Dramatics Club 3, 4 
Softball 2, 3, 4 
Hockey 2, 3, 4 
Basketball 3, 4 
Octet 4 
Founder's Day 
R. H. Award 4 



«Mte 



-" 







ELIZABETH WINSOR HOLIHAN 

68 Salem Street 
Andover, Massachusetts 

University of Colorado 



"Live, love and be happy." 



Souped-up VW . . . Souped-up kid . . . 
Monday is my day OFF! . . . WILDCAT 
U.S.A. . . . P. A. . . . local taxi . . but I've 
gained 1 5 lbs. ... I don't believe this class! 
. . . Frost and Tip ... far away ... for 
independence . . . 



CAE Club 

French Club 4 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Tutoring 4 

Stage Manager 3 




SUZANNE JOHNSON 

Dingleton Road 
Greenwich, Connecticut 

International School of Fine Arts 

Vice-President of CAE Club 




You bet your sweet bippv . . . Pappagallo 
girl . . . Mrs. Brewer, would you believe 
I'm sick again . . . well, girls . . . John- 
skunk, please get off the floor . . . Mary- 
land Andover . . . Drooper . . . Also Charlie 
. . . Boston sprees . . . you name it and I've 
got it . . . Florida Freckles . . . forever 
spraying . . . "Sun Country" . . . 



7 find the great thing in this world is not so much 
where we stand, as in what direction we are 
moving." 




CAE Club 

Class President 2 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Octet 4 

Photographv Club 3, 4 (President) 

Dramatics 2 

Dramatics Club 4 

Splinters Business Board 4 

Founder's Dav 3 

Ski Club 3, 4 

Volleyball 3 

Basketball 4 (Captain) 

Cheerleader 3, 4 

Hockey 3 (Captain), 4 

Softball 3, 4 

R. H. Award 3, 4 




LINDA JOY JUSZCZAK 

c/o Aramco 

Box #1516 

Dhahran, Saudi Arabia 

Skidmore College 



"Strong and content, I travel the open road." 



Sillv goose . . . it's all in the book ... at 
home . . . where? . . . TRAVEL ... Oh, 
JOY . . . Saudi . . . M&M Peanuts . . . 
neat? . . . What's it like? . . . Catholic 
boarding school product . . . hates snow 
. . . splurge . . . I'm a dear little white rose 
. . . chemistry, maybe . . . acting? . . . but 
I learned it that way . . . 



CAE Club 

Honor Roll 3, 4 

Dramatics 3, 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Dramatics Club 4 

French Club 4 

Riding Club 4 

Water Ballet 4 

Splinters Business Board 4 

Hockev 4 

Volleyball 3, 4 

Basketball 3, 4 

Softball 3, 4 

Cheerleader 3, 4 

Founder's Day 3 

Photography Club 4 

R. H. Award 4 

Music Appreciation 4 (Honorable Mention) 







MARILYN ANN KEAST 

45 Three Ponds Road 
Wayland, Massachusetts 

Centenary College for Women 



Lizard . . . BUDDY! WHO DO YOU 
THINK YOU AH? . . . long weekends 
. . . turn off the lights, someone's at the 
window . . . get the gun! . . . Excedrine 
No. 9 . . . OOOH! Doesn't that make you 
mad? . . . Lisa, WHERE ARE YOU? . . . 
Had it up to here . . . I'm asleep! . . . Up 
to date Rate . . . Doesn't matter how stale 
... do you wanna know what's for dinner! 
. . . bottomless pit . . . Middlesex has the 
nicest boys . . . 





"For I am full of matter, the spirit within me 
constraineth me." 



KAVA Club 

Dramatics 3 (Honorable Mention), 

4 (Honorable Mention) 
Music Appreciation 3 (Honorable Mention) 
Photography Club 3, 4 
World Affairs Council 4 
Spanish Club 4 
Splinters Art Board 4 
Hockey 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 
Swimming Team 3, 4 
Water Ballet 4 
Founder's Day 3 

Basketball 3 (2nd team), 4 (Captain) 
Softball 3, 4 

Riding Club, Co-President 4 
R. H. Award 3, 4 
Senior Luncheon Art Board 3 
Breakfast Club 4 
Art Club 4 (President) 
The Columns Staff 3 
Debate Club 4 

Art Appreciation 4 (Honorable Mention) 
Art Prize 4 




ROBIN ANN LaFOLEY 

Liberty Square Road 
Boxboro, Massachusetts 









"The soul of a jotirney is liberty, perfect liberty, to 
think, feel, do just as one pleases." 



"Eddie" ... I got to get out of here! . . . 
Ed? . . . KIM . . . Greasers in Acton? 
Never! . . . It's parents' weekend at La- 
Foley's! or could it be Kim's? . . . Give us 
a little whistle, Rob . . . Ah, so Robin, 
Chink . . . El Burro . . . The extra long va- 
cation did me good . . . Mirror, mirror, on 
the wall who's the the skinniest of them 
all? . . . smokin' at the local boiler room 
brought about a smoke out. 



KAVA Club 
Cheerleading 3 
Volleyball 4 (Manager) 
Spanish Club 4 
Commencement Play 3 




JAN LAUNDON 

Sachem's Head 
Guilford, Connecticut 

University of Perugia 




Jannie Bananie . . . diet . . . Vermont . . . 
closet junior year . . . oh, WOW! I hate 



food . . . lightfooted 
Boston overnights . . 
play a girl? . . . 



. finally a SISTER! 
Nassau . . . can't I 



"Let each hecome all that he was created capable 
of being." 




KAVA Club 

French Club 4 

Photography Club 4 

Riding Club 4 (Co-President) 

Hockey 3, 4 

Basketball 3, 4 

Volleyball 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 4 

Dramatics 2 (Honorable Mention), 3, 




CHRISTINA LEFFERTS 

292 Washington Boulevard 
Springfield, Massachusetts 

Appalachian State College 



"An honest man's the noblest work of God." 



CAE Club 

R. H. Award 3, 4 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Dramatics Club 4 

Photography Club 3, 4 

Spanish Club 3, 4 

Cheerleading 3, 4 

CAE Song 4 

Junior Life Saving 2 

Senior Life Saving 4 

Christmas Chorus 4 

Water ballet 4 

Andover Dance Committee 3 

Field Hockey 3, 4 

Volleyball 2, 3 (Captain), 4 

Basketball 3, 4 

Softball 3 

Swim Team 3, 4 

Tennis 3 

Badminton 4 

Field Day Team 3 

Athletic Award 4 



Lley, mush— we're going to Alaska ... A 
lost senior ring is depressing . . . I'm so 
dizzy . . . R. Chamberlain . . . Come in 
. . . We renamed it the "Smokie" . . . older 
friends . . . 




WENDY MARTIN 

72 North Street 
Grafton, Massachusetts 

Colby Junior College 




Den . . . THE Mother . . . Newport . . . 
be back in a flash . . . my parents love 
Jack, too . . . What will I do with two 
rings? . . . Grafton accent . . . Janis juice 
. . . THE ESCAPE . . . telephone . . . 
King of the Swing and the jacked-up 
GTO ... 



"But you, child of space, you relentless in rest, you 
shall not he trapped nor tamed." 




KAVA Club 
Glee Club 3, 4 
Dramatics 3 
Dramatics Club 4 
Ski Club 3 
Founders Day 3 
Volleyball 4 
Hockey 3, 4 
Waterballet 4 
Basketball 3, 4 
Softball 4 




"Reading makes a full man— Meditation a profound 
man— Discourse a clear man." 



CAE Club 

Class Vice-President 2 

Glee Club 2, 3 

Dramatics Club 4 

Octet 3, 4 

Photography Club 3, 4 

Hockey 2 (Captain), 3, 4 

Volleyball 2, 3 (2nd team) 

Swimming Team 2 

Cheerleader 2, 3, 4 

Ski Club 2, 4 

Founder's Day 3 

Basketball 4 

Proctor 3, 4 

Senior Luncheon Literary Board 3 

R. H. Award 4 



ALIDA BAIRD McILVAIN 

1109 Beech Road 
Rosemont, Pennsylvania 

Converse College 

Editor of Splinters 

Picklemack . . . hour showers . . . who, 
me? NEVER! . . . "grin and bear it" . . . 
It's NOT going to bother me . . . always 
trying . . . mine is Peanuts' philosophy . . . 
I'm not a coward: only partly . . . the 
ITCH . . . got to get that duck . . . deter- 
mination and pride . . . LEAVE, I'M 
MEDITATING! ... why hurry, they'll 
wait ... If I were king of the forest . . . 
Cinifer is coming! . . . silent ecstacy of 
home . . . 




BETSY ANNE NAUSS 

84 Greenacres Avenue 
Scarsdale, New York 

Centenary College for Women 



Who me? . . . Sometimes I feel like rnoie 
of a burden to you . . . Scaresdale . . . hid- 
den key . . . giggles . . . PLEASE . . . 
license— when? . . . athletics ... I will 
never take a train again . . . worry wart 
. . . hearty milk maid . . . 




"Only for the happy man does the tree of life 
flower." 




CAE Club 

Splinters Art Editor 4 

Art Prize, undergraduate 3 

Ski Club 3, 4 (President) 

French Club 4 

Water -Ballet 4 

Founder's Dav 3 

R. H. Award 3, 4 

Hockey 3, 4 (Captain) 

Volleyball 3, 4 

Basketball 3, 4 

Softball 3, 4 

Swimming team 3, 4 

Athletic Award 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Art Prize 4 

Art Apppreciation Award 4 

Honor} Roll 4 




DEBORAH PLETSCHER 

1647 Gratiot Street 
Saginaw, Michigan 

Westminster Choir College 

President of CAE Club 



"A sensitive flower in a garden grew.' 



Saginaw . . . how long do you think it will 
be bv Christmas? Tilton . . . flat ... I 
miss fights with Isabel . . . tonsils . . . Miss 
Purity is getting corrupted ... I can't wait 
to get out of this place . . . CLARK! 



*«*.; 



CAE Club 

The Columns 2, 3 

Dramatics 3 (Honorable Mention), 

4 (Honorable Mention) 
Music Appreciation 3 (Honorable Mention), 

4 (Honorable Mention) 
Glee Club 2, 3, 4 (President) 
Student Council 3 
Octet 4 

Cheerleader 2, 3 (Head), 4 
Basketball 2 
Ski Club 3 
Founder's Day 3 
Red Cross 2 
Wnter Ballet 3, 4 
Volleyball 3, 4 
Debate Club 3, 4 
French Club 4 




NICOLA TOWNSEND PLIMPTON 

Old Sudbury Road 
Lincoln, Massachusetts 

Colby Junior College 





Nicky and Niki . . . Stratton ski trips . . . 
Vermont for the nth time ... I sit in the 
back and croak in the morning . . . four 
years is enough . . . beautiful hair . . . cot- 
tage cheese and ketchup? . . . Lowell to 
Lincoln in 15 minutes? . . . three-day 
weekends . . . 



"When love came first to the earth, the spring 
spread rosebuds to receive him." 





CAE Club 

President of Day Students 4 

Student Council 4 

R. H. Award 3 

Proctor 4 

Spanish Club 3 

Hockey 1, 2, 3 (Captain), 4 

Softball 1 (2nd team), 2, 3, 4 

Basketball 1 (2nd team), 2, 3, 4 

Volleyball 1 (2nd team), 2, 3, 4 

Tennis 3 

Music Appreciation 4 (Honorable Mention) 




TONI MARIANNE POLLAK 

63 Atlantic Avenue 
Boston, Massachusetts 

Boston University 

President of the Student Council 



"It's the spirit which we bring to the fight that 
decides the issue. It is morale that wins the 
victory." 



The flying nun . . .Oh, Sav! 
ma . . . Italian . . . Steve . . 
Suburbia ... fire hydrants 
day leaves . . . Stinkah . . 



. . big Mom- 
Bucknell . . . 
. . Bostonian 
Swish, swish 



. . . What camera? . . . onlv seventeen . . . 
Robes bv Dior . . . Friar Tuck . . . Tonette 
. . . hesitant visiting . . . 



CAE Club 

Glee Club 1, 2, 3, 4 

Student Council 3, 4 (President) 

Neatness Award 1, 2, 3 

Dramatics 2, 3 (Honorable Mention), 

4 (Honorable Mention) 
Debate Club 3, 4 
Basketball 3, 4 
Volleyball 3, 4 
Photography Club 4 
Softball 2, 3 
Hockey 2, 3, 4 
R. H. Award 3, 4 
Spanish Club 3, 4 





AMELIA MARJORIE ROWE 

1418 Rose Virginia Road 
Reading, Pennsylvania 

Endicott Junior College 




Crow . . . I've got wrinkles under me . . . 
Bowdoin . . . bikini . . . witch laugh . . . 
Pardon me! I'm sick . . . ask me if I care 
. . . Toni, the doorknob . . . it's reversible 
. . . Mark Eden Course did it . . . Oh, it's 
freezing, Worsham! , . . Don't be so dumb, 
Ann, you know it's all in the book . . . 



"We know nothing of tomorrow; our business is to 
be good and happy today." 




KAVA Club 

Glee Club 3, 4 

Octet 3, 4 

Splinters Business Board 4 

Dramatics 3, 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Dramatics Club 4 

Volleyball 4 

Hockey 4 

Swimming 3 

Spanish Club 4 

Photography Club 4 




JANE WELLS SELLER 

789 Colrain Road 
Greenfield, Massachusetts 

Vernon Court Junior College 






"To where beyond these voices there is peace." 



Zeller ... I'd like to see Jane ZELLER 
right after this please . . . Geoff . . . the 
Cape . . . Green Camaro . . . Dad's old 
Army jacket . . . Pork Chops and mashed 
potatoes . . . When am I goin' to wash my 
hair? . . . Envied hair ... to where there 
is a small hotel called Pine Manor! 



CAE Club 




Hockey 3, 4 




Basketball 4 




Volleyball 3, 


4 


Softball 2, 3, 


4 



Breakfast Club 4 (President) 




SUSAN KRUEGER SPRING 

4 Elm Street 
Concord, Massachusetts 

Centenary College for Women 




It's been a rough road . . . Tufts . . . Scot- 
tie honey . . . Bermuda— Where else? . . . 
But, I couldn't get the homework . . . 
Yelps from the back of the room . . . just 
forget it . . . Ce N'est pas JUSTE!!! . . . 
A terror on the tennis courts . . . independ- 
ent . . . friendly to newcomers . . . Cool it! 
. . . beautiful clothes . . . Lefferrrts ... I 
just don't believe it . . . Tuesday's lab 
day . . . 




"A fool may talk hut a wise man speaks." 





CAE Club 

R. H. Award 3, 4 

Music Appreciation 3 (Honorable Mention) 

Softball 1, 2, 3, 4 

Basketball 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 

Hockey 3, 4 (2nd team) 

Volleyball 2 (2nd team), 3, 4 

Tennis 2, 3, 4 

French Club 4 

Founder's Day Team 3 

Cheerleading 1, 2 

Badminton Award 4 

Tennis Award 4 




". . . all these forms and faces in a thousand 
relationships to each other, all helping each other, 
loving, hating and destroying each other and be- 
come newly horn . . . a passionate, painful example 
of all that is transitory." 



KAVA Club 

Hockey 3, 4 

Basketball 3, 4 (Manager) 

Volleyball 3 

Softball 2, 3, 4 (Captain) 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Octet 3, 4 

Art Club 4 

Riding Club 4 

Photography Club 4 

Dramatics Club 4 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Literary Prize 3 (LTndergrad) 

Senior Luncheon Literary Board 3 

Lowell Mental Health Center Worker 4 

Founder's Day 3 

Stage Manager 4 

Katherine Whitten MacGay Literary Prize 4 



ELISABETH LOCKRIDGE STRASBURG 

6671 MacArthur Boulevard 
Washington, D. C. 

The Friends World College 



Mr. Gregory? . . . Wine and Roses . . . 
Indian Feet . . . into a world of the sub- 
conscious ... I Ching . . . Psychiatric 
Ward— 10 . . . elephants have right of 
way! . . . jingling pockets . . . loaded laun- 
dry bags . . . implements of destruction! 
. . . night flights . . . later or never . . . 
"Complicated? Only slightly confused" . . . 
two o'clock vibes . . . "soft as a baby's bot- 
tom" . . . the object of life . . . "even more 
than that" ... a touch of tenderness in the 
mind's eye . . . shy but sly— yet the beauty 
of innocence . . . precious moments . . . 
and human relations . . . 




. 



STELLA LYNNE TATIAN 

57 Lexington Avenue 
Bradford, Massachusetts 

Wheelock College 





Really, Miss Perkins! . . . kindergarten 
teacher . . . chatty . . . full of fun . . . 
never a silent moment for Tash . . . B.C.— 
Beware, I'm on my way . . . will somebody 
please call me Lynne . . . future barroom 
pianist ... a pair of skis, please, and 50 ft. 
of packed powder . . . Whatever happened 
to Tiny (Tim)? . . . Hugh, you can't come 




"No one conquers who doesn't fight." 



in 




KAVA Club 

Splinters Literary Board 4 

Proctor 4 

Current Events 2 (Honorable Mention), 3 (Prize) 

Tutoring 4 

Senior Luncheon Committee Literary Board 4 

Debate Club 3, 4 (Vice-President) 

Hockey 4 (Manager) 

Commencement Play 2, 3, 4 

Dramatics 3, 4 (Honorable Mention) 

Latin Club 3 

Spanish Club 4 

Ski Club 2, 3 

Field Day Team 3 

Tilton Dance Committee 4 

Christmas Chorus 2, 3, 4 

World Affairs Council 4 




JOHANNA BUCKLAND TIGHE 





23 Holyrood Avenue 
Lowell, Massachusetts 

Lowell State College 



"Compassion, the fairest associate of the heart." 



J.B.T. . . . Engravings of Peter never to 
be forgotten . . . U. Mass. baby . . . Oh, 
sure! . . . Whippoorwill is where it's at . . . 
Races to the Pot . . . friendlv . . . entering 
the Derby? Behind the couch, again? . . . 
frustrating History classes . . . future biolo- 
gist . . . Tootsie pops for all . . . 






KAVA Club 

Hockey 1, 2, 3, 4 (1st team) 

French Club 2, 3 (Vice-President), 4 (President) 

Volleyball 1, 2, 3, 4 (1st team) 

Spanish Club 4 

Dramatics 3, 4 




ANNE PARKER WASHBURN 

Red Stone Hill 
Plainville, Connecticut 

Centenary College for Women 




TOWEL DAY . . . goggles . . . Confucious 
says . . . food saver . . . "Don't Walk Away, 
Rene" ... A funny thing happened while 
I was working in the hospital . . . I'm not 
Johnson! . . . the four-thirty run . . . 



"He has achieved success who has lived well, 
laughed often and loved much." 




KAVA Club 

Proctor 3 

Student Council 4 

Splinters Business Board 4 

Dramatics 4 

Latin Club 3 (President), 4 

French Club 4 

World Affairs Council (Vice-President) 4 

Cheerleader 2, 3 (Captain), 4 

Volleyball 4 

Softball 3 

Hockev 3, 4 

Basketball 3, 4 

Founder's Dav 3 

Photography Club 4 




«*•*« 




J 



DEBORAH ANN ZINN 

Ballwood Road 
Old Greenwich, Connecticut 

Centenary College for Women 



"Victory belongs to the most per server ing." 



Mini bod . . . Why can't I find just one 
good one? . . . Rabbit . . . French lovers 
are the best . . . I'm going crazy . . . 
Which Rogers? . . . Homework, that's all 
we ever get . . . Antigua . . . 






CAE Club 

Class Vice-President 1 

Music Appreciation 1 (Honorable Mention), 2, 3 

Current Events 2 (Honorable Mention) 

Tutoring 3 

Tilton Dance Committee 2, 4 

Andover Dance Committee 2, 3 

Swim Team 3, 4 

French Club 4 

Father's Day Committee 3, 4 

Proctor 2, 3, 4 

Christmas Play 4 

Glee Club 2, 3, 4 

Music Appreciation Award 4 

Neatness Award 4 







SENIOR SONG— 1969 

Undergrads we are singing to you 
Thinking how sad it will be when we leave 
To go our way without your being there. 

Candles, memories always to share 

Day after day the work's made us aware 

Of our friendship and what it does mean to us. 

We've wandered through the days 

And we have had so many talks and laughs between us; 

But now we must go along and bear the tears 

That we know should turn to laughs. 

June third is so very close; 

Let us smile and wipe the tears 

For we'll meet again someday. 

Goodbye dear undergrads 
Goodbye dear undergrads 

—Eddy and Hall 



CALENDAR 

September 

18 THE OPENING OF THE SCHOOL YEAR 

Getting into the groove again. 
21 SINGING BEACH 

Business and pleasure do mix. 

October 

5 EXETER DANCE 

Roll call never sounded better. 
11 SENIORS TO SEE HELEN HAYES IN The Showoff 
ANDOVER CELEBRITY SERIES - Tom Paxton 

14 SENIOR PICTURES 

Images of untouched(?) innocence. 

16 HISTORICAL TRIPS 

A fascinating visit with our heritage. 
18 QUEEN'S GUARDS - BOSTON GARDEN 
Valuable lessons for the riding club 

26 PSAT'S 

A stinging realization that the road to college ain't that easy. 

27 SENIORS - CHARLES PLAYHOUSE 
Odets' Awake and Sing 
INITIATION 

Darwinian Philosophy — Survival of the fittest? 1 ?? 

SENIOR SISTER CEREMONY 

And one by one the room became lighted with smiles. 

November 

1 SECOND TEAM HOCKEY - CAE 

2 PARENT'S DAY 

FIRST TEAM HOCKEY - CAE 

5 BOSTON SYMPHONY 

15 FRENCH CLUB DINNER 
C'etait tres bon, yum, yum. 

17 PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT AT ABBOT 
Staring in awe at the works of Dorothea Lang. 

23 FALL PLAYS 

ART GALLERY TRIP 

24 SENIORS - CHARLES PLAYHOUSE 
THE BACCFIAE 

Happiness is going to see a play after you've read the book. 
Modern version of Dionysus Legend. 

26 STUDENT-FACULTY VOLLEYBALL GAME 
One way to breach the generation gap. 

27 THANKSGIVING VACATION 
Silent prayers of thanks to the Pilgrims. 

December 

6 ANDOVER CELEBRITY SERIES 

7 SATS FOR SENIORS 
Ugh! 

ANDOVER CONCERT AND DANCE 

A welcome relief after a long day — Medley of "Windy," "Second-Hand 

Rose," "A Man and a Woman" . . . 






CALENDAR 



10 
13 



14 



17 



18 



January 

7 

15 
17 
18 

20-24 
27-30 

30 



BOSTON SYMPHONY 

FRESHMEN AND SOPHOMORES 

Our Town - PRODUCED BY ARLINGTON FRIENDS OF THE 

DRAMA. 

SENIORS - LOEB DRAMA CENTER, HARVARD UNIVERSITY 

GOLDSMITH'S She Stoops to Conquer 

Comedy and Satire a-plenty 

CHRISTMAS BANQUET 

CHRISTMAS PLAY - A Fabulous Tale 

With a sober thought to start off the new year. 

CHRISTMAS VACATION 

Everyone blinded by facial radiance 

RETURN FROM VACATION 

The show must go on . . . 

SECOND TEAM VOLLEYBALL - CAE 

FIRST TEAM VOLLEYBALL - CAE 

ANDOVER DANCE - SOPHOMORES AND JUNIORS 

Weird manifestations of the mind 

REVIEW WEEK 

EXAMS 

Lots of knowledge, a little know-how and a teeny bit o' bull! 

LONG WEEKEND 

At last!! 



February 

7 

14 
15 

21 



22 



23 



SENIORS— Rozencrantz and Guildenstern are Dead 

An introduction to Hamlet 

ANDOVER CELEBRITY SERIES 

GLEE CLUB AT LAWRENCE ACADEMY 

Expression through song 

SKI CLUB DINNER 

An occasion to celebrate the skiers delight; a winter with snow 

plus, plus . . . 

GLEE CLUB AND TILTON SCHOOL 

"A song will outlive all sermons in the memory." 

ICE CAPADES 

Tintinnabulating on the ice. 



plus, 



28 IUNIOR DINNER 



March 
1 



8 



13 
14 



JUNIORS - SAT'S 

DANCE AT ST. PAUL'S 

Strain the brain in the afternoon, bend the mind at night. 

BAKER'S DOZEN AND BROOKS SCHOOL DANCE HERE 

Yale and Brooks, not bad for one night. 

SPRING PLAYS 

SPRING VACATION 

"Awake! The morning shines, and the fresh field calls us . . ." 



CALENDAR 



April 



1 RETURN FROM SPRING VACATION 
Spring fever running rampart. 

8 SECOND TEAM BASKETBALL - KAVA 

9 FIRST TEAM BASKETBALL - KAVA 

16 GREAT BOOKS DISCUSSION WITH EIGHT R.H. SENIORS 
AND EIGHT BROOKS SENIORS 
Coeducational thinking on Camus' The Stranger. 

19 FATHER'S DAY 

Like father, like daughter. 

29 SCIENCE MUSEUM TRIP 

May 

3 JUNIORS - ACTS 
FOUNDER'S DAY 
A long awaited time to see old friends. 

7 TEA FOR SPLINTERS STAFF AT MRS. WORSHAM'S 
The social event of the year. 

8 BOSTON POPS - SENIORS 

9 AMERICAN HISTORY CLASS TO SUPERIOR COURT 
16-19 SPRING DANCE 

"Midnight shout and revelrv tipsy dance and jollity." 

20 NORTH SHORE MUSIC TENT - The Taming of the Shrew 
"Every man, as the saving is, can tame a shrew but he that hath her." 

23 SHOWING OF SENIOR PROJECT - SLIDETAPE OF Go Tell It 

On The Mountain bv James Baldwin. 

SOFTBALL GAME - 

SWIMMING MEET - 
19-22 REVIEW WEEK 

The calm before the storm. 
26-29 EXAMS 

The Storm!!! 

30 SPELLING BEE 
SENIOR SISTER NIGHT 

SENIORS AT MISS RAMSAY'S HOUSE 

31 SINGING BEACH 

Where, oh where are the grand ole seniors? 



June 



1 BACCALAUREATE SERMON 
"A word to the wise is sufficient." 
MUSICALE 

2 SENIOR LUNCHEON 
CLASS DAY EXERCISES 

COMMENCEMENT PLAY - Mrs. McThing by MARY CHASE 

3 RECEPTION FOR SENIOR CLASS 
COMMENCEMENT EXERCISES 







Don't hit a man when he's down, 
Miss Perkinsl 



1 have such an expressive face 




I'm Lovable 



PROPHECY 

Twenty-five years have passed incredibly fast and the class of '69 has now reunited in a beautiful old 
castle tucked away in Italy where Jan Laundon is living with her husband and eight charming bambinos. 
Jan still hasn't mastered the Italian lauguage but is doing a fantastic job running the castle in the medieval 
tradition. The class has been transported to Italy by our famous socialite party girl, Cindy Brox, in an 
enormous chartered blimp. She is in charge of greeting all her former classmates along with Betty Hall. 
They are both busy serving Cindy's renowned brownies and chocolate milk. Betty certainly has followed 
through with her perfect services back home; she is the new enthusiastic director of studies for Moody 
School and is an avid symphony goer. Along with contributing her APPLE-POLISHED food and decora- 
tions to all good causes, she plans to open her own elegant fashion shop within the next year. With what 
little free time she finds, she is found HOPPING down to Key Biscayne. 

It is a grape stomping party and everyone is found enjoying herself immensely in the great tub of 
grapes. Fortunately Linda Juszczak, who is now one of the world's leading sandal importers has shown 
up, having spent days traipsing across the desert on her camel, with sandals for everyone's tired feet. Her 
delay was due to her picking up scattered rubber bits from the last war. 

We notice a splash from the moat and see Marion Eddy trying to swim back to Martha's Vineyard 
having realized she forgot her knitting needles. Meanwhile we are browsing through her latest publica- 
tion of Notes of a Native Vineyardite that has now hit the height of the Best Seller List. The reunion 
is a most festive occasion and nearly everyone here is in fine health except for Amelia Rowe who has 
recently had a knee operation and is depressed because she can't get in and stamp on the grapes with her 
crutches. Amelia, freezing as usual, is wrapped in a blanket even though she has on her thermal under- 
wear. She has finally achieved her Ph.D. in Chemistry and is at Bowdoin teaching by the logical theory 
that "everything is all in the book." 

Toni Pollak is standing by having returned from Boston Society and heading the Convent of the 
SDS. She has made an effective Mother Superior in spreading the good word and still saving people 




You'd never know I'm a mobster! 



That's the beginning of the end. 



4&- £ A 

■18 

1 Jn 


m ■■ 


h ' 






1 



Kick the habit! 



PROPHECY 

from raids. She and Steve have bought out the Commodore Ballroom, since they have had so much invested 
in it through the years. It is now a thriving success. 

Wendy Martin got an old romance. Dicky, KING OF THE SWING, to rev her up in his jacked up 
GTO via Vermont to the party; although she overslept, she made connections to the blimp successfully. 
She and Dennis have made a fortune with their new DENNY-GRIP products. 

Tatian was chosen to speak at this high occasion and had proven herself a fine character in having 
enlarged her vocabulary to an UNBELIEVABLE capacity. She will also provide music — a drum duet 
with her faithful lover, Hugh. Tatian has taken over the advertising for Ernie Boch selling CREAM 
PUFFS. 

LaFoley has taken off from Bergdorf's on a fund raising tour as honorary chairman of the American 
Cancer Society. Robin is still single as she hasn't yet decided between Kim and Eddie. 

Jody Tighe has taken charge of Whippoorwill and if she ever stops HORSING AROLTND, she may 
BREAK IN her green husband, Peter, to her overpopulated chicken farm. 

Estela Alvarez sends greetings with flowers and she regrets missing the occasion. Last word from 
Stella concerned her "Up With Communism" march in the Dominican Republic, lest democracy move 
in while she is away. She is vice-director of the Foster Parent Program and has attached an envelope 
to the flowers asking for fat contributions ... to help support her cause. 

Totally void of U. S. MALE, Debbie Zinn has acquired a fluency in the French tongue, and is en- 
joying Le Paris Date-a-Mate Computer Program. It seems to have slipped out that Debbie is working as 
a top-notch underground spy for the SECRET police and is extremely advantageous to the Spy World. 

Via TWA, Ellington arrives late with the newest blond hair coloring. Apparently she had trouble 
figuring how to get off the L.A. freeway ... A pick-up truck had to push her to the airport. Seller is 
planning a three o'clock walk to the store for old times sake . . . with Brown. Gulley Queen Jane now has 
acquired a PERMANENT tent to protect her from cold winter days. 

Debi Pletscher has become chief director of Carol's Muscle Building Course in Saginaw, and runs 
a thrift shop clearing house for lost and found articles in her spare time. Her many years at Westminster 
seem to have contributed to her development, and she is now giving concerts at the Newport Folk Festival. 

Lefferts has apparently decided that athletics was not her true vocation because she is here to model 
Christian Dior's latest creation. She is now running a mountain camp in Appalachia; she has invited us 
all to attend her health spa to rehabilitate our sagging corpses. 

Marilyn Keast felt as pressured into this burdensome European voyage as she did the last. TIP-toeing 
through the tulips by way of Government Center (where her father still works), she was married 
as planned in Trinity Church and had her little long-haired Tippies baptized there. She plans to give free 
tours of Boston. 

Jeff Foster bops out of the tub of grapes to show everyone her gold medal for her book "Synchronized 
Bubblegum Chewing for Advanced Chewers." Now that she has bought out Double Bubble and Swell, 
she has become a champion. 

Ann Yodel Hemingway is here having just won a prize for her unique rock collection in the 
ghettos. She is now composing her second symphony under the pen name of Sophia Peruzzi and she has 
brought along pictures of her and Augie Perrelli playing stepball. She has also brought along her band 
with Ginger Baker and Bru, to contribute to the entertainment. 

Plimpton is here with Nick. She is running a farm in Vermont with a picturesque mountain in the 
back. Jody Tighe and Niki had a double wedding as planned. 

Sue Johnson is a Miami socialite and is often seen escorted by Rudi Geinrich. She owns a branch of 
Pappagallo and offers a discount to those of us who would like to stock up on shoes. Or was that Washburn? 

Anne Washburn has been swimming in the tubs with her three inch goggles on, but occasionally 
surfaces to remind those residents of the second floor MacGay freakhouse that it's towel day. She has 
finally found a worthwhile occasion to wear her glamorous white heels since graduation twenty-five years 
ago. 



PROPHECY 

Betsy Nauss is here with full confidence having come directly from her one man art show. She 
seems to have had trouble making connections with the blimp for her motor bike in Bermuda had 
broken down and she had lost the key. Juszczak is trying to persuade Betsy to join the Barnum and Bailey 
production to exhibit her talents of hand-walking. 

Of course, Spring has flashed in from the HEAD set of Concord with frolicking noises that attract 
wide attention, which reminds Foster to tell late arriver Ellington of the dramatic episode that occurred 
on the blimp. Spring was restless and stomped up to the pilot to complain about the "Bye, Bye Birdie" 
movie. At her return, having accomplished nothing, she found that Wendy had taken her window seat. 
In a rage of jealousy she grabbed Wendy's new fraternity pin, that Wendy just happened to be showing off, 
and was so fumed with HOT AIR that she rose to the top of the blimp, where she remained suspended 
and sulking for the remainder of the trip. We were all in a tizzy when we noticed that Spring had begun to 
jab holes in the blimp with her stolen pin and that we were slowly descending into the Mediterranean. But 
alas, relief was quick to come when Marion whipped out some adhesive tape from her First Aid Kit. 
Pam Bell ran to the rescue next and proceeded to scale the side of the blimp in her SPACED snow 
boots to patch the holes Spring was still poking, not realizing that she was multiplying the troubles. After 
taking the pin, Pam remained afloat to stand guard over Spring to prevent further attacks. 

Karen Anderson's prediction that we would arrive in TIPSY-top shape, safe and sound on the castle 
roof was quite accurate, despite our frantic doubts because of the incredible changing altitudes. Karen is 
now working in research for the Muhlenburg Museum. She is here today keeping a record of the varying 
colossal events of the day. These are to be added to the RH Archives. 

Dania Doremus has now been voted No. 1 citizen of her class for her complete knowledge of the 
PROBLEMS of Democracy. Miss Perkins would be so pleased if she knew. Dania decided that school 
in England was not her BAG and now has joined the circus as a lion tamer. As a side line, she opened 
a boarding house and has an extremely progressive vegetable garden. She tells everybody to come down 
and see her sometime. 

Truda Bloom is travelling from Boston where she is madly directing at the Charles Playhouse. She 
grew panicky in fear that the blimp would not land safely and made a dramatic exit from it, landing her 
Bloom Photo Research Parachute in a clump of treetops where she is still stranded. Her playful class- 
mates are using her as their grape-throwing target. S he is, however, assured of rescue of one sort or another. 

A telegram to Seller from Brown has just arrived, sending regrets about their walk to the store . . . 
but, Brown can't make it back from her post as Spanish interpreter for Castro in Cuba as a result of an- 
other hijacked flight caused this time by a tobacco plantation owner. 

Holihan is a ski bum out West. She sent a letter by way of specially trained carrier pigeon from 
her tree house at the top of Aspen, informing us that we would have to do without her this round. We 
didn't REALLY expect her since it's Monday. She tells us that a few years ago she achieved her goal as 
lead role in a P. A. production. 

Unsuspected Alida Mcllvain is flouncing around the castle today, accompanied by Cinnifer II, dis- 
guised as her real self. She, Pam Bell, and Lisa Strasburg are creating a seance in the throne room. Alida 
has long since completed her Charles Schultz philosophy course and has taken over Granny's GOODIE 
Shoppe along the MAIN line, while on the SIDE line, she is a bovine milkmaid at Montgomery Farm. 

Lisa's arrival was by way of Emily, her elephant. She sneaked over the horizon and over the draw- 
bridge with some of her CORE workers as usual bringing up the rear. She is now head of all Peace Corps 
affairs in tropical Africa. Some of the more festive members are urging Lisa and Truda to take candid 
shots of this memorable reunion. Truda, however, is still a bit bruised from her morning in the trees. 

Pam, after finding her year at Katie Gibbs unharmonious to her intellectual and artistic talents, has 
become a Groupie, brazening the wilds in her orange "Harry" hearse. 

An echoed call is heard from the dungeon where we are informed the wine cellar is located . . . and 
dust settles as the last of the Class of '69 disappears down the winding staircase . . . 

Pam Bell, Lisa Strasberg, and the Staff 




Estela Alvarez 




Sue Brown 




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Marion Eddy 




Ann Hemingway 




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Lynne Tatian 



Jodi Tighe 



Anne Washbxirn 



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Debbie Zinn 



CLASS WILL 

WE LEAVE: 

MISS RAMSAY a suitably scented mailman. 

MISS ALEXANDER a computer to solve Devra Kaufman's problems. 

MISS BAMFORD peeling up to the altar to the tune of "Run-Around Sue." 

MISS BOWES physiologically speaking. 

MRS. BREWER the directorship of speech therapy at R.H. 

MRS. CROSBIE stripping her gears on the way to the health club. 

MISS DAY all of the following equipment for her favorite pastime: a peri- 
scope with a left-right directional bar and automatic demerit calculator, 
a pair of P.F.'s, and a whistle. 

MRS. HOFFER a dumb waiter for Bruno. 

MRS. A. JONES an exhaust fan. 

MRS. F. JONES the Nobel Prize for the "newsiest" newsletter. 

MISS LEBUTT a player piano that plays fifteen different movements of 
her favorite tune, "CHOPSTICKS." ' 

MRS. LATOUR as newly elected head of the C.I.A. 

MRS. MALONE a secret passageway to her classroom. 

MRS. MILLER a giant cookie jar to keep filled for RH occasions. 

MISS PAYNE "uptight!" 

MISS PERKINS a "Hot-line" to Washington. 

MRS. PERLOFF with a new lease on life. 

MISS PHELPS in a gold studded toga. 

MRS. PHINNEY supposedly alone in the office to eat her lunch. 

MISS PULLING wondering if "it is the limit!" 

MRS. SARGENT 6,283 "bottles" that have been "setting" in since Sept. 

MRS. SADOWSKI a new date-a-mate. 

MRS. STATEN a Harley-Davidson for emergency runs to the railroad 
station. 

MRS. WORSHAM with the "SPRING" of '69! 

BILL a combination leather recliner and massage machine to be used Tuesday 
night, June 3rd. 

ROGER a Go-Cart with blades, so he can cut the grass in fourth gear. 



CLASS WILL 

"AWAKEN WORLD!" we leave ESTELA ALVAREZ having a sinking spell on 

the doorstep of the Kremlin-en Espanol! 
KAREN ANDERSON leaves the Anderson-) uszczak Papers to the next happy 

Chemistry couple. 
PAM BELL leaves the walls of MacGay still vibrating with midnight hysteria. 
TRUDA BLOOM leaves her room to the Photography Club and her long, straight 

black hair to the Dramatics Club Wig Box. 
SUE BROWN leaves in a puff of smoke. 

CINDY BROX leaves on her chocolate cow for the party at Jack's. 
DEE DOREMUS leaves dramatically. 
MARION EDDY leaves her spike heels to Margy Mink. 
SUZY ELLINGTON leaves still wondering where L.A. is. 
JEFF FOSTER leaves her escape routes to PAM TIKELLIS. 
BETTY HALL leaves her super-charged filing system to the front office. 
ANN HEMINGWAY leaves for the Summertime Step-ball Championships in the 

Ghettoes of New Haven. 
HOLLY HOLIHAN leaves on Wednesday since Tuesday is her day OFF! 
SUE JOHNSON leaves her medical record to BetteAnn Mack. 
LINDA J USZCZAK leaves gaily singing her Arabian drinking songs off tune . . . 

but "she learned them that way." 
MARILYN KEAST leaves at a gallop to organize LIFE drawing classes at the 

cemetery. 
ROBIN LAFOLEY leaves her impossible dream of becoming a day student to the 

Junior Class. 
JAN LAUNDON leaves with a code book in hand entitled, "How to Respond to 

Italian Propositions." 
TINA LEFFERTS leaves in search of a regulation size gym. 
ALIDA McILVAIN leaves for the first time on schedule. 
WENDY MARTIN leaves her vast collection of fraternity pins to LISA 

CATHERINE. 
BETSY NAUSS leaves her sunny smile to some gloomy cat. 
DEBI PLETSCHER leaves a complete and unabridged volume of complaints to 

ELLEN PECK. 
NIKI PLIMPTON leaves on the first flight to Vermont after her last drag race 

with Spring. 
TONI POLLAK leaves in her friar's robe for the "BIG U." chapel to solve more 

new problems. 
AMELIA ROWE leaves those Bowdoin Beasts for those Tufts Tigers. 
JANE SELLER leaves the Syrian bread bakery of greater Lowell sold out! 
SUSIE SPRING happily leaves MRS. WORSHAM. 
LISA STRASBURG leaves her suitcase rack for other things. 
LYNNE TATIAN leaves HUGH WORSHAM a key to the dormitory so he can 

cease clawing at the screen. 
JODY TIGHE leaves at a stiff canter for U-Mass. 
ANN WASHBURN leaves, thank heavens, on Towel Day!! 
DEBBIE ZINN leaves, ROGER, over and out!! 

Lynne Tatian and the Staff 




Now just a cotton pickin minute! 



Here, as usual lies the mouse that roared 



Hello, Young Lovers! 



The Three Stages of Taping Go Tell It On The Mountain 




Hysteria 



Pain 



Madness 




Herbie, Pleeze, Pleeze, come down 
from there! 



But I only said it's Towel day! 



Oh Herhie, you fracture me . . 




Bosom Buddies 





She think' s she's a dear little white rose. 



Now it's my turn to look out the window 




Alida's my BEST friend 



I told my mother my health would 
he impaired 



The love of the young for the young, that is the beginning 
of life. But the love of the old for the old, that is the begin- 
ning of— of things longer. 

—J. K. Jerome 



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Junior Class Officers 

President Martha Pihl 

Vice-President Pamela Tikellis 




Sophomore Class Officers 
President Nancy Ingraham 
Vice-President Susan Anton 



Freshman Class Officers 
President Susan Whitney 
Vice-President Deborah Evans 





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Tea for two 



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Today - an actress, 

Yesterday - a ballerina, 

Tomorrow . . . 



Toujours V Amour . . 



Anytime, anywhere, anyhow . 




If 1 only had three roommates 
like these . . . 



Today is Sweet Charity day 




Say that again . 



Coming hack in is the REAL test! 



Co-ed next year?! 



I'm Bee-oo-tiful. 




Of course it isn't catching 



Serenity untold 




Spring is hustin' out all over 



Well, Veruscka made it 



The short period of life is long enough for living well and 
honourably. 

—Cicero 



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GOVERNMENT 




Student Council 
Seated: Miss Ramsay, Pollak (President), Thomas. 
Standing: Eddy, Washburn, Wick, Plimpton. 




Student Proctors 

Seated: Miss Ramsay, Pollak (President), MacMannis. 
Standing: Mink, Tatian, Knowles, Fairbairn, Torrey, 
Tikellis, Laing, Sohier, Johnson, Ingraham, Pihl, 
Mcllvain. Absent: Rowe, Zinn. 



PUBLICATIONS 




Splinters 

Front: Juszczak, Hall, Nauss (Art Editor), Mcllvain (Editor-in- 
Chief), Anderson (Business Manager), Doremus. 
Second Row: Washburn, Strasburg, Alvarez, Bloom, Keast, Johnson. 
Rear: Rowe, Brox, Tatian, Eddy. 



The Columns 

Front: Shipton, McCartin, Sweet (Editor), Anton. 
Second Row: Young, Saba. 



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MUSIC 




Glee Club 

Front: Mink, Shipton, Stewart, Hemingway, McCartin, Knowles, Pihl (Vice- 
President), Miss LeButt, Pletscher (President), Kaufman, Kacher, Hoar, Zinn, Eddy, 
Second Row: Hall, Foster, Sweet, Torrey, Martin, Perkins, Whitney S., Catharine, 
Peck, Slimmon, Gilbert, Winzeler, Anton, Tatian, Sullivan B. 

Third Row: Wick, Rowe, Keast, Ingraham, Pollak, Williams, Chernin, B., Sohier, 
Keck, Evans, Whitney A., Lefferts, Johnson, Dewey, Quinn, Curry, Potter. 



The Glee Club - 1968-69 



The Glee Club of Rogers Hall has always been one of the most active clubs in our school. It is the 
largest voluntary club and it offers both social and cultural advantages. The Glee Club for the 1968-69 
season had a membership of some forty-five girls, who sang both pop tunes and classical music. The club 
has prospered under the direction of Miss Dorothy A. LeButt. 

Our first concert and engagement of the year was held for the entire school in the traditional manner 
with the Phillips Academy Band of Andover, under the direction of Mr. William Clift. The band itself 
gave a magnificent performance, but the highlight of the evening was, and has always been, a medley of 
tunes sung by the combined clubs. This year we sang three recent compositions, including "Second Hand 
Rose," from the production Funny Girl; "A Man and A Woman," from a movie of the same name; and 
"Windy," by a popular rock group, The Association. A dance followed the concert and music was pro- 
vided by a rhythm and blues band from Andover. 

Our next concert was held some two months later with the Lawrence Academy Glee Club, at Law- 
rence. Following our short bus ride to Groton, we were escorted to the lounge where we met our dates. Fol- 
lowing our nervous introductions we filed into the auditorium for our concert rehearsal under the direction 
of Mr. Joseph Shepherd. The highlight of the performance was the joint number, "The Road Not Taken," 
which is a poem by Robert Frost adapted for music by Randall Thompson. Our rehearsal of the number, 
"Helen of Troy," added a humorous note. The light excerpt from the operetta featured soloists Amelia 
RICE (alias Rowe) and her partner Bill Rice. Also featured was the performance of the R. H. Octet, better 
known as the R. H. Negatives. They received undivided attention for their interpretation of an old favor- 
ite, "Sentimental Journey" (Ba, Ba, Ba Bum!) 



MUSIC 

A dance followed the concert and dinner with a Lawrence Academy rock group as entertainment for 
"dancing" or whatever they call it! The sounds struck a sweet note with the girls and their dates, but sent 
the faculty members into a soundproof room! 

Exactly a week later the R. H. Glee Club were hostesses to the Tilton School Glee Club from Tilton, 
New Hampshire. The gym was decorated with colored strobe lights and resembled the local discotheque. 
We were all pleasantly entertained by The R. H. Negatives and The Tiltonaires, who fervently sang us 
some traditional Bowdoin College drinking songs. Their conductor was Mr. John MacMoran, who had come 
to R. H. for the first time and truly enjoyed himself, as we all did. 

The alumnae of R. H. have always been entertained by the Glee Club on Founder's Day, Elizabeth 
Rogers' birthday, and this year was no exception. We sang nothing extravagant, but we offered a friendly 
welcome to the alumnae with "Consider Yourself," from the Broadway production and Academy Award- 
winning movie, Oliver. 




R. H. Negatives 

Kneeling: Mink, Hemingway, Strasburg, Mcllvain. 
Standing: Pletscher, Rowe, Eddy (leader), Johnson, Wick. 



The Negatives performed very well 
this year under the able leadership of 
Marion Eddy. The group has become a 
great asset at school dances and other af- 
fairs, especially with the added attraction 
of Amelia Rowe and her guitar. The high- 
light of the year was the appearance of 
their very fine stereo recording done at the 
Fassett Studio in Boston and sold to stu- 
dents and friends. 





French Club 
First Row: Kaufman, Foster, Shipton, Juszczak. 

Second Row (seated): Mrs. Hoffer, Holihan, Washburn, Plimpton, Pletscher. 
Third Row: Wick (Vice-President), Tighe, (President), Drury, Mellick, Spring, 
Perkins, Laing. 
Fourth Row: Nauss, Zinn, Sohier, Vallis, Brox, Anderson, Bloom, Laundon. 




Spanish Club 
Back Row: Creen, Doremus, Thomas, Lefferts, Copeland, Tik- 
ellis, Tatian, Pollak, Rowe, Knowles. - 

Front Row: Dewey, Alvarez (President), Keast, Ellington, (Vice- 
President), Plimpton, Pihl. 




Latin Club 

Front: Laing, Ingraham (Vice-President), Anton (President), Saba, Shipton. 

Standing: Tikellis, Potter, Thomas, Pletscher, Washburn, Knovvles, Whitney S. 
Not present: Miss Phelps, (Advisor). 




Debate Club 

Kneeling: Hall, Tikellis (President), Saba. 

Standing: Pollak, Tatian (Vice-President), Pletscher, Keast. 

Not Present: Whitney A., Kaufman. 




Ski Club 

Kneeling: MacMannis, Laing, Loring, Dewey, Waterman, Bisset, Mellvain, Russell, 

Blain. 

Standing: Shipton, Mellick, Gray, Slimmon, Chernin B., Knowles (Vice-President), 

Nauss (President), Thomas, Washburn, Johnson, Davis, Chernin G. 




Riding Club 
Left to Right: Shipton, Hoar, Templet, Sweet, Vallis, Chernin, Pletscher, Perkins, 
Tighe, Laundon (Co-President), Keast (Co-President), Potter. 




Photography Club 

Front Row: Hemingway, Sullivan B., Keast, Mcllvain, Strasburg. 
Second Row: Washburn, Johnson (President), Alvarez, Hoar, Bloom (Vice- 
President), Juszczak. 
Standing: Rowe, Hall, Lefferts, Pollak, Laundon, Torrey, Gray, Thomas, Dewey. 





Art Club 

Standing: Mrs. Perloff (Advisor), Laundon, Keast (President), Doremus, Perkins, 

Fairbairn, Evans, Seward. 

Kneeling: Hughes, Guvnkraut, Nauss, Mcllvain, Church. 




Breakfast Club 

Left to Right: Seller (President), Foster (Vice-President), Nauss, Pollak, Hall, 
Johnson, Keast, Hemingway. 





What a groovy rehearsal! 



Ahhhhh, shad-wp! 




Dramatics Club 

Front: Mrs. Dorothy Worsham (Director). 

Front Row: Eddy, Anderson, Keast, Rowe, Tatian, Bloom, Strasburg, Mcllvain. 

Middle Row: Copeland, Thomas, Lefferts, Martin, Laing, Laundon, Juszczak, Anton, 

Slimmon, Pletscher. 

Last Row: Hall, Johnson, Hemingway, Brox. 

Top: Doremus (President), Not Present: Bell (Vice-President). 





Chu-Chu to you, too. 



What a layout! 



Nothing ever succeeds which exhuherant spirits have not 
helped to produce . . . 

— NlETZCHE 



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Deborah Pletscher, President 
Suzanne Johnson, Vice-President 




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Dania Doremus, President 
Ann Hemingway, Vice-President 



CAE 2 — KAVA I 




CAE Hockey 

Sitting: Eddy, Pollack, Nauss (Captain), Juszczak, Vallis. 

Standing: Brox (Manager), Peck, Nields, Mcllvain, Slimmon, Plimpton, Johnson. 




KAVA Hockey 
Virst Row: Loring, Waterman, Keast, Hemingway (Captain), Green, Shipton. 
Second Row: Martin, Rowe, Washburn, Knowles, Alvarez, Thomas, Tatian (Mgr.). 



HOCKEY 




November 4 finally came after much anticipation and preparation for another 
competition between CAE and KAVA. The hockey game, full of intense cheers and 
bursting spirit, ended with tears and a CAE victory with the close score of 2-1. Until 
the first half, both teams held a tieing score, each of the goals made by Sue Johnson 
for CAE and Ellen Green for KAVA. 

Finally in the end of the second half, Niki Plimpton rushed up the field and 
scored CAE's winning goal. The game was followed by a hockey banquet at which 
Dania Doremus presented Debi Pletscher with the hockey cup and the teams were 
presented with charms. Everyone was tired and happy after a strenuous day at 
Rogers Hall. 



CAE 



Anderson 


Mink 


Begg 


Potter 


Blain 


Russell 


Brown 


Sohier 


Hoar 


Spring 


Laing 


Zinn 


Mack 





Second Teams 






KAVA 


Aubin 


Lindsay 


Bell 


Mellick 


Dewey 


Saba 


Doremus 


Stewart 


Ellington 


Strasburg 


Hall 


Williams, 


Laundon 






** 



CAE 38 — KAVA 23 




CAE Volleyball 
First Row. Juszczalc, Plimpton. 
Second Row. Seller, Vallis, Anderson. 
Third Row. Foster (Mgr.), Nauss, Spring, Pollak (Capt.), Lefferts, Slimmon. 




KAVA Volleyball 

Left to right: LaFoley (Manager), Waterman, Knowles, Ellington, Martin, 
Alvarez (Capt.), Thomas, Hemingway, Green, Bloom. 



VOLLEYBALL 




You think you've got troubles! 

The volleyball game began the winter season with another tense game. The 
screams became almost deafening in the gym as each club sang its team song and 
cheered. 

CAE finished the game with another victory of 38 to 23. Betsy Nauss scored 
eleven of CAE's points and Laura Waterman scored seven points for KAVA. Each 
team showed great skill and unity throughout the game, as they were backed by the 
spirit of their clubs. 

The season also included a hilarious student-faculty game. The faculty, dressed 
in midi blouses and bloomers and aided by an equally well decked out cheering 
squad led by Miss LeButt, played the game with all kinds of innovations. Mrs. 
Sadowski's modern dance techniques gave an artistic tone to the proceedings, while 
Mrs. Perloff's arrival in a wheelchair due to a back injury suffered in an intensive 
practice session lent a touch of pathos. - The final score in favor of the students was un- 
mentionable, but everyone agreed that the faculty were good sports and the game 
was great fun. 









Second Teams 








CAE 31 - KAVA 23 




CAE 






Begg 




Mcllvain 




Brown 




Nields 




Curry 




Peck 




Eddy 




Pletscher 




Mink 




Sohier 





KAVA 
Copeland Shipton 

Drury Tatian 

Laundon Tikellis 

Pihl Washburn 

Rowe Young 





Is it "rah" you want us to say? 



Leaning into it is the secret. 



KAVA 29 — CAE 28 




KAVA Basketball 
Left to right: Thomas, Keast, 
Hemingway, Knowles, Green, 
Loring", Strasburg (Manager). 
Absent: MacMannis. 




CAE Basketball 

Left to right: Laing (Mgr.), Nauss, Spring, Pollak, Anderson (Capt.), Lefferts, 
Juszczak, Plimpton, Macllvain. 



BASKETBALL 



The CAE and KAVA first team 
began their exciting game at 2:45 
Wednesday afternoon, April 9. From 
the beginning, both teams played 
with amazing skill. Judy Knowles 
was KAVA's high scorer with 14 
points to support their winning total 
of 29 points, closely followed by 
CAE with 28 points, 16 of which 
were made by Susie Spring. 

Each club was filled with fan- 
tastic spirit, making this game the 
most successful this year. 




Where, oh where, has the little hall gone? 







Second Teams 












CAE 


12 - 


- KAVA 


15 








CAE 












KAVA 


Brown 


Mink 










Ellington 


Shipton 


Eddy 


Seller 










Keck 


Washburn 


Hughes 


Vallis 










Laundon 


Waterman 


Johnson 


Whitney, A. 










Martin 


Williams 




Just get out of my way! . 

BASKETBALL BANQUET 

Following the basketball game was the banquet which was missed last year due 
to the celebration of the 75th anniversary of the Rogers Hall School. During dinner, 
songs were sung to the first teams and Sue Johnson presented Ann Hemingway 
with the basketball cup. During dessert, both clubs sang their club songs, later to be 
judged by the faculty for words, tune and spirit. CAE Club's song "Get Me to the 
Gym on Time" by Sue Johnson and Tina Lefferts won the prize of lollipops. 

KAVA Club's song "Three Silver Spoons" by Betty Hall, Dania Doremus, and 
Marilyn Keast was also very much appreciated. 



SOFTBALL 
CAE 26 — KAVA 2 1 




What a viexvl 



The softball game began at 3:00 on May 14. With Bill as our umpire the game 
had as usual many interesting calls without which Rogers Hall softball would not be 
the same. Each club was filled with new spirit after the long winter season. The two 
teams each made exceptional plays and each member played equally well. With the aid 
of the picket fence, nearly every hit was a homerun. To those watching, any concept 
of a score was impossible yet CAE finally managed another victory. 



Anderson 

Blain 

Brown 

Eddy 

Johnson 

Laing 

Lefferts 

Nauss 



CAE 
Nields 
Plimpton 
Pollak 

Seller (Capt.) 
Slimmon 
Spring 
Vallis 
McCann (Mgr.) 



Softball Teams 

Bisset 

Copeland 

Dewey 

Drury 

Ellington 

Hemingway 

Keast 

Knowles 



KAVA 




MacMannis 

Martin 

Pihl 

Shipton 

Strasburg (Capt.) 

Thomas 

Waterman 

Rowe (Mgr.) 




I always TIP them 



Strike four! 



CHEERLEADERS 




CAE Cheerleaders 

Front Row: Chernin, B., (Mascot), Nauss (Captain), McCann (Mascot). 
Second Row. Juszczak, Foster, Curry, Pletscher, Johnson. 
Standing: Anton, Vallis, Mcllvain, Mack, Peck. 




KAVA Cheerleaders 
Front Row: Fairbairn, Dewey, Phil, Shipton, Templet, Knowles, 
Center: Tikellis, MacMannis. 
Rear: Ellington, Sweet (Mascot), Washburn. 



CAE 106 — 




CAE Swim Team 

Nields, Curry, Nauss, Grynkraut, Wick, Anderson (Manager), Lefferts, 
Hughes, Slimmon, Juszczak, Zinn. 




KAVA Swim Team 

First Row. Keast, Evans, Thomas (Captain). 

Second Row: Copeland, Pihl, Bisset, Dewey, Waterman, Hall, Hemingway, 

Tikellis (Manager). 



WATER BALLET 





\KA\i 



Water Ballet 

Slimmons, Lefferts, Shipton, Martin, Evans, Spring, Thomas, Hoar, Keast, Doremus, 
Pletscher, Ingraham, Grynkraut, Hall, Juszczak, Nauss. 
Standing: Washburn, Anderson (Managers) 

This year's water ballet was a delight. The circus theme was carried out with 
authentic sound effects and bizarre costumes. Bill and Roger labored on the technical 
problems and managed to construct an effective aerialist wire, on which Linda 
Juszczak spiraled out into the pool, and a cage big enough for lengthy Debbie Evans 
to use as her lion's den. Dania Doremus was a hit as the lion tamer who ended up 
being shoved in the water by her faithless beast. The whole show was such a success 
on Father-Daughter Day that it was repeated for Founder's Day. Hats off to Miss 
Bowes and her hardworking crews. 





CUP WINNER — SUSAN SPRING (CAE) 




CAE Badminton 

Vallis, Spring, Mink (Manager), Nields, Lefferts. 




KAVA Badminton 

Sitting: Tikellis, Shipton 
Kneeling: Pihl, Knowles 
Standing: Alvarez (Manager) 



CUP WINNER — SUSAN SPRING (CAE) 




CAE Tennis 
Seated: Mink (Manager) 
Standing: Spring, Laing, Lefferts, Nields. 




KAVA Tennis 
Seated: Shipton, Knowles, Laundon. 
Standing: MacMannis, Alvarez (Manager). 



AT RH WE HAVE . . 








THE SPORTIN' LIFE 






He was never less at leisure 
Than when at leisure . . . 



—Cicero 



X 



m 



PARENTS' DAY 




The weekend began Saturday, November 2, when CAE and KAVA opened their 
fair at 11:00. Lunch was held at 12:00 for the girls and their parents. During the 
luncheon the Octet made their first appearance singing a few of their new songs. 

After lunch, the Parents' Association had a meeting in the study hall while the 
first teams prepared for the oncoming hockey game. 

At 2-30 the game began and ended with CAE's victory of 2-1. When all had 
left, the school seemed empty and relieved after the long, tense day. 




FALL PLAYS 





The fall plays on November 23, 1968, began with Susan Glaspell's well-known 
Trifles. In this atmospheric, almost tragic play a police investigator, Jan Laundon, 
and two neighbors, Marion Eddy and Nancy Ingraham, are examining in the desolate 
farmhouse, the scene of a strangling. Held for the murder of her husband is Mrs. 
Wright, whom we never meet but whose cold, empty life we are made very much 
aware of by Mrs. Hale and Mrs. Peters, well played by Betty Hall and Debi Pletscher, 
who are also at the farm to gather a few things to take to Mrs. Wright in jail. The 
women, who often "worry about trifles," discover the evidence, a strangled bird, 
obviously the one happy thing in Mrs. Wright's life and the motivation for the 
murder of her husband. In a moment of compassion for the mistreated woman, the 
two country women decide to suppress the evidence. The set, with its angular flats, 
was particularly effective in this play. 




Parade at Devil's Bridge, by Henri Gheon, is a kind of morality play but, as the 
stage manager (well played by Karen Anderson)says, "there really is no moral." 
Lynne Tatian was a wonderfully malevolent devil who pitted himself against Toni 
Pollak, ironically cast as Father Kado, who finally promised to give up the first soul 
to cross the bridge so that the Devil would not continue to break it down. Lisa Laing, 
Father Kado's cat, saved the human souls by being the first one to cross the bridge. 
In fury at being outwitted, the Devil leaves forever while the old fisherman, well 
played by Mary Thomas, and his daughter, Jodi Tighe, rejoice with the good priest 
over their victory. 



FALL PLAYS 




The final play of the evening was the wonderful farce The Man in the Bowler 
Hat, by A. A. Milne. The Chief Villain and the Bad Man, excellently portrayed by 
Truda Bloom and Amelia Rowe, try to steal the Rajah's ruby from the Hero, Debbie 
Evans, who has hidden the ruby in a hat box in one of twenty London railroad stations. 
The Hero confuses the Villain who interrogates him by repeating the cycle of sta- 
tions, each one containing a ticket in a hat box for the next. The scene takes place 
in the home of Mary and John, perfectly played by Kitty Wick and Cindy Brox, 
who until now have felt that "nothing exciting ever happens to them." Kathleen 
McCartin, wearing a bowler hat, sits downstage with her back to the audience and 
turns out to be the director of the play we too are watching. Truda's entrance to 
appropriate villain music and Debbie Evans' passionate embraces of the heroine, 
pertly played by Betty Sullivan, added much hilarity to the proceedings. 




CHRISTMAS PLAY 




The Christmas play on December 17, 1968, was very well done especially con- 
sidering the Thanksgiving to Christmas flu epidemic, which had forced us to cancel 
Christmas Vespers. A Fabulous Tale by Richard F. Stockton is a most unusual 
rendition of the good vs. evil and the power of prayer themes. It is set in the slums 
of any city outside the opposing doors of the Salvation Army and a gambler's haven, 
a poolroom. Captain Amy, forcefully portrayed by Ellen Curry, prayed for enough 
potatoes to feed the poor people, such as the blind beggar realistically played by 
Louisa Reppucci. Jiffy Copeland, the proprietor of the poolhall and rival of Captain 
Amy, cared only for profit and the well-being of his favorite customers such as the 
silent man with all the money, humorously played by Betsy Slimmon. Linda 
Juszczak as the fashionable thrill-seeker Alicia and her bored fiance, Marilyn Keast, 
tease the blind beggar about his handicap, accusing him of faking; they are a 
a reminder of the selfish and worldly. Then Captain Amy's prayer, an act of firm faith, 
is answered; potatoes fall from the sky, a technical effect requiring a lot of thought and 
skill on the part of the backstage masterminds. The blind beggar regains his sight 
after eating one of the potatoes that lands in his cup. But, of course, the world 
rejects the miracle. Ann Hemingway as the policeman added much humor by 
rushing in, discovering the mysterious substance on the ground, and ordering the 
unimpressed street cleaner, Truda Bloom, to sweep away the potato-miracle. 

The Glee Club provided appropriate background music and some of the 
members were carollers in the street scene on stage. As so frequently happens the 
Christmas production proved to be one of the most effective of the year. 



mm 

if 


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fcai 


a 










an 


\Jjt:} 






ftig 



SPRING PLAYS 




The first of the spring plavs on March 13, 1969 was the final scene of The 
Heiress based on Henry James' Washington Square, which had been studied by the 
seniors in the fall. Though he had jilted her two years before, Morris, played by 
Truda Bloom, returned to pursuade the wealthy Catherine (Bettv Hall) to marry 
him. To his surprise she is willing to set forth that evening. Aunt Penniman's 
(Toni Pollak) romantic nature becomes excited since the relationship was spurred 
on by her doing. However, when Morris returns with pride of his success and a 
few belongings, (Louisa Reppucci), who played the maid, bolted the door for 
Catherine. Catherine could be cruel since she had "learned from masters." 




The Dramatics Club presented a Shaw one-act play, Poison, Passion and 
Petrification, along with the other spring plays. Truda Bloom directed the madcap 
proceedings. Debbie Pletscher portrayed the glamorous Lady Fitztollemache caus- 
ing the conflict between her husband, Marion Eddy, and Adolphus, her lover, Karen 
Anderson. In the chaos of the revengeful poisoning of Adolphus, the maid, played by 
Linda Juszczak, the landlord, (Ann Hemingway), the policeman (Pam Bell), and 
the doctor (Tina Lefferts), all appear. The landlord at first concerned about the 
noise soon found himself more upset about his lime ceiling being torn down as an 
antidote for Adolphus. 



SPRING PLAYS 




In Mother's Day, by J. B. Priestly, Kittv Wick as a meek housewife exchanges 
roles with an aggressive woman, Lynn Tatian, in order to teach her family a lesson 
about taking advantage of her. The mother suddenly refuses to wait on her spoiled 
daughter, played by Marilyn Keast, and her demanding son, played by Jiffv Cope- 
land. When her husband, well played by Mary Thomas, learns of her new eight-hour 
work day limit, he is thoroughlv shocked and upset. The family, after a humorous 
discussion, understands and begins to appreciate their mother. Now satisfied, she 
exchanges roles once again with her helpful friend. 




The final play, Aria da Capo, by Edna St. Vincent Millay, illustrates the 
comedies and tragedies of life. Comedy can become tragedy as shown by the killings 
of Corydon (Amelia Rowe) and Thyrsis (Lisa Laing), who started out as friends. 
The world often ignores tragedies. Ellen Curry as Cothurnus, the Masque of 
Tragedy, directed this scene on stage. Columbine (Linda Juszczak) and Pierrot 
(Debbie Evans) act as clown-lovers to give the harlequinade effect. Their charm is 
overwhelming. Mrs. PerlofFs set was particularly effective with its stark black and 
white decor and its smaller details such as a giant black flower and a huge artichoke. 



FOUNDER'S DAY 

Founder's Day seems to be one of the few events of the year that almost every- 
one participates in preparing for, in one way or another. 

Most of the early arriving alumnae wandered around the Art and Photography 
rooms to judge the creative works, and around the dormitory to spot and admire their 
old rooms. 

At eleven, the Senior Fair became the main attraction for old and new: there 
was something of interest for everyone, from the usual food, to skirts, posters and 
candles. 

After a delightful luncheon and the annual alumnae business meeting, the next 
event was the annual water-ballet. This year's circus theme was enjoyed by all, with 
its amusing lion taming act and graceful aerialists' performance which was ignited 
bv Linda Juszczak's soaring across the lit pool on a wire. 



FATHER-DAUGHTER DAY 




The weekend started out rather threatened with rain forcing the cookout and 
the softball game inside. The skies cleared and the fathers and daughters went off 
after a fine performance of the water-ballet which centered around a circus theme. It 
was very well done and most comical. Everyone returned for dinner and the dance in 
the evening. The entertainment at the dance included a marvelous take-off on "Laugh 
In," separate skits, a song by Marion Eddy and the ever-flowering sweetness of the 
Octet. 



FATHER-DAUGHTER DAY 






.'* • A- 


^ —- 




HS1 



■■ :, 





SPRING PROM 




The spring dance was transferred 
back to the formal setting in the dining 
room this year, from MacGay's less-formal 
atmosphere of last year. It was enlightened 
by a new taste that Pam Bell brought with 
her "psychedelic" band. 

Most of the mob arrived early Satur- 
day morning where they were promptly 
met by a bus that took them on a day's 
excursion to the beach at Betty Hall's 
house. 

The dance seemed to deaden a bit 
when the seniors left for a midnight party 
at the Broxes home, where they were 
entertained at a roast beef dinner by a 
male folk-singer. 

Sunday morning was off to a slow 
start when the tired undergrads and the 
droopy-eyed seniors dragged in for an early 
breakfast at MacGay. After maximum 
confusion, the seniors tramped off again 
to the beach for a second warm day in 
the rays, this time to Janie Seller's house 
on the Cape, where the main attraction 
was the boat and the refreshments. 

The big weekend came to an end 
when the three cars with the exhausted 
beachcombers straggled up to MacGay— 
wet, weak and weathered. 




THE GAY LIFE 



■—— — mm m iuwm ■ ■— • - 





COMMENCEMENT PLAY 




Our final play at commencement time was Mrs. McThing, by Mary Chase. This 
delightful fantasy-comedy revolves around Howay Larue, a dual personality played 
professionally by Ann Hemingway, whose mother, played in Betty Hall's capable 
style, refuses to allow just "any ragged child" to associate with him. Linda Juszczak, 
the persistent Mimi, wants to play with Howav, and she gets her mother, a witch 
called Mrs. McThing, to change Howay into a prim and proper Stick at home while 
the real Howay ends up on the other side of the tracks where Mimi can play with 
him. Mrs. Larue's friends, the Lewis sisters, played humorously by Kitty Wick, Debi 
Pletscher and Marilyn Keast, can't get over the wonderful change in Stick Howay 's 
behavior; however, Howay's nurse, played convincingly by Cynthia Brox, notices the 
change and causes Mrs. Larue to follow up on the mysterious phone calls she has 
been getting from "some strange child." After scouring Skid Row Mrs. Larue finds 
the real Howay in the Shantyland Pool flail Lunchroom where he has joined the 
Schellenbach mob. The plot is complicated further by Mrs. McThing's making an- 
other stick and putting it in Mrs. Larue's place at Larue Towers so that she too has 
to stay with the mob. 

The gangster scenes were delightful. Poison Eddie Schellenbach, Dirty Joe 
McGinnis, and the Stinker are caricatures of gangsters. Truda Bloom, Karen Ander- 
son and Toni Pollak did marvelous jobs recreating these characters down to specific 
mannerisms and articles of clothing. Other humorous additions to the play were 
Amelia Rowe as the chef who plays an imaginary piano and serves onlv people 
whose names he likes, and Kathleen McCartin as Mrs. Schellenbach who appears 
occasionally to beat up her wayward son. 

The play draws to a climax when Mimi savs that she knows a way to get every- 
one back to Larue Towers. Guns won't do it but she will use one of her mother's 
tricks provided Mrs. Larue will continue to let her play with Howay. The entire 
group, including the mob, arrive at Larue Towers where Mimi burns the stick charac- 
ters just in time for the police to arrive. The real Mrs. Larue saves the mob from the 
law and pairs them with the flirtatious Lewis sisters who think they are collectors of 
silver, not thieves. 

The ugly witch, effectively played by Lynne Tatian, then appears to scold Mimi 
for siding with humans, but she returns once again as a beautiful witch to say goodbye 
and to leave Mimi with the Larues. 



COMMENCEMENT PLAY 





Now hear this . 



A stage manager s lot is not a happy one 



Cast of Characters 



Mrs. Howard V. Larue, III .... Elizabeth Hall 

Carrie Cynthia Brox 

Sybil Louisa Reppucci 

Evva Lewis Kathleen Wick 

Maude Lewis Deborah Pletscher 

Grace Lewis Marilyn Keast 

Nelson Genevieve Copeland 

Howay Ann Hemingway 

Chef CEllsworth^) Amelia Rowe 

Virgil Mary Thomas 



Dirty Joe McGinnis Karen Anderson 

Stinker Toni Pollak 

Pclson Eddie Schellenbach .... Truda Bloom 

Mrs. Schellenbach Kathleen McCartin 

Mimi Linda Juszczak 

Policeman Deborah Evans 

Mrs. McThing 

Ugly Witch Lynn Tatian 

Beautiful Witch Ellen Curry 



Technical Staff 

Director Mrs. Dorothy Ann Worsham 

Scenery designed and executed, by Mrs. Dorothy Perloff 

assisted by Roger Collins 

Staae Manager Dania Doremus 

Sound Nancy Dewey 

Make-up Christina Lefferts, Alida Mcllvain, Elisabeth Strasburg 

Jo Anne Sweet, Suzanne Templet, Susan Whitney 
Costumes Hooker-Howe Company, Haverhill, Massachusetts 




RH VARIED CURRICULUM 




Apple picking for polishing 



Meditation 



Public Speaking 







Extrapolating 



Scholarly dissertation 



Contemplation and repose 




Popular Mechanics 



xerasing 



SPRING Headholding 



CLASS DAY AWARDS — 1969 



CLUB CUPS 



Hockey CAE 

Volleyball CAE 

Basketball KAVA 



Softball CAE 

Swimming CAE 

Badminton CAE 

Tennis CAE 



INDIVIDUAL AWARDS 



Badminton 

Tennis 

Posture 



... Susan Spring 
.. Susan Spring 
Elise Catharine 



RED CROSS LIFE SAVING - SENIOR 



Christina Lefferts 
Ellen Peck 



Amelia Rowe 
Susan Shipton 



Betsey Slimmon 
Mary Thomas 



R. H. AWARDS 



Given to those who have earned a total of seventy or more 'points in one 
year. Points are given for athletic ability, sportsmanship, captains, 
managers, water ballet, posture and neatness. 



Karen Anderson 
Suzanne Johnson 
Linda Juszczak 
Christina Lefferts 
Alida Mcllvain 
Betsy Nauss 
Nancy Nields 
Toni Pollak 



CAE 



Betsey Slimmon 
Susan Spring 
Vanessa Vallis 



KAVA 

Susan Ellington 
Ann Hemingway 
Marilyn Keast 
Judith Knowles 
Martha Pihl 
Susan Shipton 
Mary Thomas 
Laura Waterman 



HONORARY R. H. AWARD Dania Doremus 

NEATNESS AWARDS 

Hall Barbara Gray 

MacGay Ellen Peck - Deborah Zinn 



ANNOUNCEMENT OF CLUB OFFICERS FOR NEXT YEAR 



CAE 

President Nancy Nields 

Vice-President Vanessa Vallis 

Cheerleader Ellen Peck 



KAVA 

President Mary Thomas 

Vice-President Susan Shipton 

Cheerleader Nancy Dewey 



COMMENCEMENT 

The Baccalaureate 

At 10:45 a.m. Sunday the school met at All Souls Church for the Baccalaureate 
Service. The Reverend Thomas E. Dipko encouraged the members of the class of '69 
to live in truth. His sermon most appropriately pointed out the problems that youth 
are being confronted with today. He asked the seniors to be true to their morals and 
ideals by which they were brought up. In short the familiar quotation, "To thine own 
self be true," was the overall theme. 

Following the sermon the school was served delicious refreshments by the parish 
members. 

The Musicale 

On Sunday at 3 : 30 the Glee Club and the Octet combined their efforts into the 
annual Musicale. It began with the Recessional by the Glee Club. The Glee Club 
sang "No Man Is An Island," "Love Is Blue," and "More." Between these numbers 
the Octet performed "Sunday Morning," and "The Lonely Goat Herd." It was 
obvious that both groups had worked very hard, for the Musicale was a success. 

Senior Luncheon 
A luncheon honoring the senior class took place on Monday. It began with the 
girls at Miss LeButt's table singing various songs to the senior class. The poems and 
the gifts from the undergraduates were amusing and sometimes very appropriate. 
The girls were also given leather frames from Miss Ramsay and tiny replicas of 
MacGay. At the end Miss Ramsay presented the survivors of four years with beautiful 
carnations. 

Class Day 

After the Senior Luncheon everybody filtered into the gymnasium. Miss Ramsay 
and Miss Bowes began by announcing the athletic awards after which the clubs sang 
their songs. Then the present club heads announced the new ones. Most ably, Pamela 
Bell and Lynne Tatian read the Class Prophecy and the Class Will respectively. The 
activities ended with the walls still shaking from the hysterical laughter. 

Graduation 

The morning began with threatening skies and everyone had been plagued by 
the weatherman's reporting rain showers. Nevertheless, the sun managed to peek out 
occasionally. With or without the sun the radiant faces of the senior class made up 
for the overcast skies. 

The seniors proudly showed off their dresses for the first time at 9:30 at a 
reception for parents and friends and walked into the gymnasium at 10:00 for the 
last time to the tune of "Pomp and Circumstance." 

The Reverend Victor F. Scalise, a friend of Rogers flail for many years, gave 
the address. He urged us to do "our thing" provided it possesses the qualities of 
"perspective, compassion, and love for humanity." Mr. Scalise gave us courage to 
face the world with the proper attitude. 

Dr. David Latham, President of the Board of Trustees presented the long 
awaited for diplomas to the anxious seniors. Then, Elizabeth Hall, President of the 
Senior Class, presented the school with books for the library. Miss Ramsay accepted 
the gift and then proceeded with the school honors. The school song was then 
sung and the Benediction was given. The seniors marched out making an arc with 
their roses and sang "When You Walk Through A Storm" while the undergrads 
went through. The seniors and the undergrads said good luck and goodbye. The 
undergrads were sad to see them go and the seniors weren't quite ready to believe 
that it was really all over. 



AWARDS AND HONORS — 1969 

UNDERHILL HONOR - COLLEGE PREPARATORY 

Karen Anderson 
PARSONS HONOR - GENERAL COURSE 
Susan Ellington 
HONOR ROLL - AVERAGE 85% OR ABOVE 
Karen Anderson Elizabeth Hall M. Pamela Saba 

Josephine Blain Linda Juszczak Elaine Sohier 

Deborah Drury Barbara MacMannis Mary Thomas 

Jennifer Foster Betsy Nauss Pamela Tikellis 

HELEN HILL AWARD 

Elizabeth Hall 

ATHLETIC AWARD 

Christina Lefferts 

Honorable Mention 

Betsy Nauss 

ART PRIZES 

Marilyn Keast - Betsy Nauss 

There are two awards this year, both of equal merit. They are being 

given to girls who are both creative and industrious. Each girl has 

contributed in a major way to either the Year Book or Splinters. 

DRAMATICS 
Elizabeth Hall 
For her steady effort to achieve that concentration known to actors as 
"public solitude." 

Truda Bloom 
For her ability to contribute to a theatre which "infects the audience 
with its noble ecstasy." 

Honorable Mention 
Karen Anderson Linda Juszczak Amelia Rowe 

Cynthia Brox Marilyn Keast Lynne Tatian 

Dania Doremus Deborah Pletscher Mary Thomas 

Ann Hemingway Toni Pollak Kathleen Wick 

MUSIC APPRECIATION 
Karen Anderson - Deborah Zinn 
Honorable Mention 
Estela Alvarez Linda Juszczak Pamela Saba 

Susan Brown Barbara MacMannis Mary Thomas 

Marion Eddy Maureen McCann Pamela Tikellis 

.Susan Ellington Deborah Pletscher Ann Whitney 

Ann Hemingway Nicola Plimpton 

ART APPRECIATION 

Seniors Betsy Nauss Undergraduates .... Frances Grynkraut 

Honorable Mention 
Susan Aubin Anne Loring Marilyn Keast 

Catherine Begg Barbara Grav 

CURRENT EVENTS 

Senior Linda Juszczak Undergraduate Pamela Saba 

Honorable Mention 

Deborah Drurv - Raleigh Perkins 

KATHARINE WHITTEN MacGAY LITERARY PRIZES 

Seniors - Elizabeth Strasburg 

For "the rich webbed images of your enchanting tongue." 

Undergraduates - Susan Aubin 

In hopes that her lyrical sense will continue to grow. 



ALVAREZ, Estela, 85-11 Avon Street, Jamaica, New York 

ANDERSON, Karen, 39 Daniels Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

ANTON, Susan, 3 Hemlock Drive, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

AUBIN, Susan, Piney Point, Marion, Massachusetts 

BEGG, Catherine, 580 Lakeland Avenue, Grosse Pointe, Michigan 

BELL, Pamela, 83 Beacon Street, Marblehead, Massachusetts 

BISSET, Sandra, 16 Wintonbury Road, Simsbury, Connecticut 

BLAIN, Josephine, 265 Williams Avenue, Grosse Pointe Farms, Michigan 

BLOOM, Truda, 27 Dewey Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

BROWN, Susan, The Knolls, Williamstown, Massachusetts 

BROX, Cynthia, 192 North Lowell Street, Methuen, Massachusetts 

CATHARINE, Elise, 1353 Park Lane, Pelham Manor, New York 

CHERNIN, Bette, 91 West Valley Road, Corner Brook, Newfoundland, Canada 

CHERNIN, Gail, Churchill Street, Stephenville, Newfoundland, Canada. 

CHURCH, Robin, 8 Preston Drive, Barrington, Rhode Island 

CLARK, Cynthia, 14 Wood Lane, Locust Valley, Long Island, New York 

COPELAND, Genevieve, 4001 Lakeview Drive, Greenville, Delaware 

CURRY, Ellen, 1604 James Road, Williamsport, Pennsylvania 

DAVIS, Judith, 17 Flint Street, Salem, Massachusetts 

DEWEY, Nancy, 428 Salisbury Street, Holden, Massachusetts 

DOREMUS, Dania, South Road, Harwinton, Connecticut 

DRURY, Deborah, Spook Hollow Road, Far Flills, New Jersey 

EDDY, Marion, 20 Ebert Drive, New Britain, Connecticut 

ELLINGTON, Susan, 424 Ocampo Drive, Pacific Palisades, California 

EVANS, Deborah, 6 Robandy Road, Andover, Massachusetts 

FAIRBAIRN, Heather, 116 Edmunds Road, Wellesley Flills, Massachusetts 

FLETCHER, Elizabeth, 67 High Street, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

FOSTER, Jennifer, 80 State Street, Ellsworth, Maine 

GADD, Carol, 33 Sioner Drive, West Hartford, Connecticut 

GILBERT, Emily, 275 Booth Avenue, Englewood, New Jersey 

GRAY, Barbara, 20 Beech Tree Lane, Pelham Manor, New York 

GREEN, Ellen, 222 Plantation Road, Palm Beach, Florida 

GRYNKRAUT, Frances, 38 Gale Road, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

HALL, Elizabeth, 345 Nahant Road, Nahant, Massachusetts 

HEMINGWAY, Ann, 81 Glenbrook Drive, Cheshire, Connecticut 

HOAR, Amabel, Barretts Mill Road, Concord, Massachusetts 

HOFPFNER, Joanne, 869 Sherman Avenue, New Haven, Connecticut 

HOLIHAN, Elizabeth, 68 Salem Street, Andover, Massachusetts 

HUGHES, Cecily, Crown Lane, Greenwich, Connecticut 

INGRAHAM, Nancy, 90 High Farms Road, West Flartford, Connecticut 

JOHNSON, Suzanne, Dingletown Road, Greenwich, Connecticut 

JUSZCZAK, Linda, c/o Aramco, Box #1516, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia 

KACHER, Cheryl, 112*4 Taplow Road, Baltimore, Maryland 

KAUFMAN, Devra, 18 Warwick Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

KEAST, Marilyn, 45 Three Ponds Road, Wayland, Massachusetts 

KECK, Erin, Granite Creek Farm, 1150 Moraga Drive, Los Angeles, California 

KNOWLES, Judith, Cumberland Foreside, Portland, Maine 

LaFOLEY, Robin, Liberty Square Road, Boxboro, Massachusetts 



LAING, Elizabeth, Hucldebury Lane, Greenwich, Connecticut 

LAPE, Kristen, 132 Chadwick Street, Portland, Maine 

LAUNDON, Jan, Sachem's Head, Guilford, Connecticut 

LEFFERTS, Christina, 292 Washington Boulevard, Springfield, Massachusetts 

LINDSAY, Caren, 4393 Carter Road, Fairport, New York 

LORING, Anne, 140 Hart Street, Prides Crossing, Massachusetts 

MACK, Elizabeth, 119 Holyrood Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

MacMANNIS, Barbara, 11 Overbrook Lane, Darien, Connecticut 

MARTIN, Wendy, 72 North Street, Grafton, Massachusetts 

McCANN, Maureen, 621 West Ferndale Road, Wayzata, Minnesota 

McCARTIN, Kathleen, 181 Belmont Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

McILVAIN, Alida, 1109 Beech Road, Rosemont, Pennslyvania 

MELLICK, Helen, Large Cross Roads, Far Hills, New Jersey 

MINK, Margaret, Norfolk Road, Litchfield, Connecticut 

NAUSS, Betsy, 84 Greenacres Avenue, Scarsdale, New York 

NIELDS, Nancy, Monument Street, Concord, Massachusetts 

PECK, Ellen, Yellow Cote Road, Oyster Bay, New York 

PERKINS, Raleigh, 658 Black Rock Road, Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 

PIHL, Martha, 135 East 7th Street, Hinsdale, Illinois 

PLETSCHER, Deborah, 1647 Brockway Street, Saginaw, Michigan 

PLIMPTON, Nicola, Old Sudbury Road, Lincoln, Massachusetts 

POLLAK, Toni, 63 Atlantic Avenue, Apartment #5D, Boston, Massachusetts 

POTTER, Harriet, Argilla Road, Ipswich, Massachusetts 

REPPUCCI, Louisa, 34 Clark Road, Lowell, Massachusetts 

ROWE, Amelia, 1418 Rose Virginia Road, Reading, Pennsylvania 

ROWLEY, Kimberly, Spencer Brook Road, Concord, Massachusetts 

RUSSELL, Heather, Battle Avenue, Castine, Maine 

SABA, Pamela, 20 Havilah Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

SELLER, Jane, 789 Colrain Road, Greenfield, Massachusetts 

SEWARD, Deborah, 48 Greenacres Avenue, Scarsdale, New York 

SHIPTON, Susan, 953 West Street, Pittsfield, Massachusetts 

SUMMON, Betsy, 555 Hill Farm Road, Fairfield, Connecticut 

SOHIER, Elaine, 4507 Crest Lane, McLean, Virginia 

SPRING, Susan, 4 Elm Street, Concord, Massachusetts 

STEVENS, Dorothy, 47 Ridge Road, Concord, New Hampshire 

STRASBURG, Elizabeth, 6671 MacArthur Boulevard, Washington, D.C. 

SULLIVAN, Elizabeth, 76 Westford Street, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

SULLIVAN, Kathleen, 14 West Hawley Street, Lawrence, Massachusetts 

SWEET, Jo Anne, 494 North Main Street, Gloversville, New York 

TATIAN, Lynne, 57 Lexington Avenue, Bradford, Massachusetts 

TEMPLET, Suzanne, Dover Road, Box #208, Guilford, Maine 

THOMAS, Mary, 109 Overhill Road, Baltimore, Maryland 

TIGHE, Johanna, 23 Holyrood Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

T1KELLIS, Pamela, 19 Perth Drive, Wilmington, Delaware 

TORREY, Susan, 7 Hilltop Road, Dover, Massachusetts 

VALLIS, Vanessa, 109 Lowell Street, Lynnfield, Massachusetts 

WASHBURN, Anne, Red Stone Hill, Plainville, Connecticut 

WATERMAN, Laura, 99 Flat Rock Road, Easton, Connecticut 



WHITNEY, Ann, 2 Grace Court Alley, Brooklyn, New York 
WHITNEY, Susan, 2 Grace Court Alley, Brooklyn, New York 
WICK, Kathleen, 35 West Cedar Street, Boston, Massachusetts 
WILLIAMS, Beverly, 1219 Andover Street, North Tewksbury, Massachusetts 
WILLIAMS, Elizabeth, 1219 Andover Street, North Tewksbury, Massachusetts 
WILLIAMS, Deborah, 12 Wood Street, Concord, Massachusetts 
WINZELER, Barbara, 512 Oakwood Avenue, Bryan, Ohio 
ZINN, Deborah, Ballwood Road, Old Greenwich, Connecticut 



FACULTY 

RAMSAY, Miss Hildred, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

CROSBIE, Mrs. Barbara, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

JONES, Mrs. Frances, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

PAYNE, Miss Peggy, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

PERLOFF, Mrs. Dorothy, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

STATEN, Mrs. Louise, Rogers Hall, Lowell, Massachusetts 

ALEXANDER, Miss Doris, 117 Redfield Ave., c/o L. A. Naylor, Fayetteville, N. Y. 

BAMFORD, Miss Susan, 40 Woodland Road, Andover, Massachusetts 

BOWES, Miss Carol, 2 Tupel Road, Swampscott, Massachusetts 

BREWER, Mrs. Ralph, Plain Road, Nabnasset, Massachusetts 

DAY, Miss Kathleen, 39 North Billerica Road, Apartment #6, Lowell, Massachusetts 

HOFFER, Mrs. Edward, 40 Jamaica Way, Apartment #9, Boston, Massachusetts 

JONES, Mrs. Agnes, 20 Fenwick Drive, Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

LeBUTT, Miss Dorothy, 144 Pine Street, Portland, Maine 

MALONE, Mrs. Thomas, 25 Alcott Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

MILLER, Mrs. Ray, 28 Gerson Terrace, Lowell, Massachusetts 

LATOUR, Mrs. Edward, 202 Parkview Avenue, Lowell, Massachusetts 

P,ERKINS, Miss Mary J., 7 Mayhew Street, Bristol, New Hampshire 

PHELPS, Miss Dorothy, 44 High Street, R.F.D., Norwell, Massachusetts 

PHINNEY, Mrs. Roland, 29 South Walker Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

PULLING, Miss Anne, 17 Louisburg Square, Boston, Massachusetts 

SADOWSKI, Mrs. Judith, 45 George Road, Winchester, Massachusetts 

SARGENT, Mrs. Marjorie, Ogunquit, Maine 

SCALISE, Rev. Victor, 222 Liberty Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

SWANN, Miss Grace, 61 Nesmith Street, Lowell, Massachusetts 

TALBOT, Mrs. Charles, 1 12 Clark Road, Lowell, Massachusetts 

WORSHAM, Mrs. Banks, Partridge Lane, Carlisle, Massachusetts 



BENTLEY, Mrs. Charlotte, 15 John Turco Dr., c/o William Thurlo, Walpole, Mass. 
BUIS, Miss Barbara, 58 Nanepashmet Street, Marblehead Neck, Massachusetts 
COLPITTS, Mrs. Stephen, 18 Winter Street, Plymouth, New Hampshire 
HABER, Miss Diane, 19 Euston Street, Brookline, Massachusetts 
HAYNES, Miss Mary, 2 Otis Place, Apartment 3R, Boston, Massachusetts 
GEISSLER, Mrs. Gary, 3241 Martha Curtis Drive, Alexandria, Virginia 
ROBINSON, Miss Carol, 2916 Bay Shore Drive, Fort Lauderdale Beach, Florida 



Annual art exhibit 




Go forth and do it 




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